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Grease Removal / Waxing in Low Temperatures

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Forum topic by LGLDSR73 posted 03-08-2021 04:03 AM 394 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LGLDSR73

17 posts in 2817 days


03-08-2021 04:03 AM

Topic tags/keywords: cast iron grease was temperature tablesaw

I recently purchased a new Table Saw and need to get the grease off the cast, then use Acetone and finally Wax. Once complete I’ll start the assembly.

Unfortunately this is located in an unheated garage where the temperature rides around 40F this time of the year. Is a low temp like that going to impede the process of removing the grease, the application of wax, etc.? I would expect much more elbow work in applying and buffing the wax but my concern is making sure all the grease is off despite the low temperature it will be done under.

Any input greatly appreciated!

Thank you!

Lyman


6 replies so far

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woodbutcherbynight

8740 posts in 3459 days


#1 posted 03-08-2021 04:40 AM

I remove grease and grim from cold engine surfaces all the time with Brake Cleaner. Also use it to remove the coating of grease on brake rotors before assembly. For cast iron I would apply the cleaner to the RAG then wipe the surface. Spraying in directly on can be messy and also get on unwanted surfaces with paint which it will mess with / ruin. Our shop this past winter was 40 ish most days. Really sucked.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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LGLDSR73

17 posts in 2817 days


#2 posted 03-08-2021 12:10 PM



I remove grease and grim from cold engine surfaces all the time with Brake Cleaner. Also use it to remove the coating of grease on brake rotors before assembly. For cast iron I would apply the cleaner to the RAG then wipe the surface. Spraying in directly on can be messy and also get on unwanted surfaces with paint which it will mess with / ruin. Our shop this past winter was 40 ish most days. Really sucked.

- woodbutcherbynight


Thanks. So you don’t see any issue with the temperature impacting getting all the grease off? Right now it’s 50F down there, 20F outside. I’m off today and would like to get it done…allegedly this Thursday it’s supposed to be a high of 67F but being a Weatherman is the only job where you can be wrong 99% of the time and still draw a paycheck…the reality of it is we’ll more than likely have an ice storm.

Thanks again,

Lyman

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Lazyman

6925 posts in 2438 days


#3 posted 03-08-2021 12:52 PM

I usually use mineral spirits to remove the protective grease. Try bringing the can of whatever solvent you are using inside the house for a bit to warm it up, though I think it will still work even if it is cold. Do the same with the wax to make it easier to apply. I may just take a little longer for it to haze over but even if it never does, I think that buffing it out will still leave enough wax behind to protect it from rust. Chances are that the humidity is also pretty low this time of year so as long as you get something on it to prevent rust you will be fine until it warms up a bit.

I have space heater mounted on the ceiling I use if it is really cold in my shop when I want to do hammer veneering, which works best when the surface and veneer you are veneering are relatively warm. You could also use a heat gun or blow dryer to warm up the surface a little if you do run into any issues. Just be careful with the flammable solvents!

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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LGLDSR73

17 posts in 2817 days


#4 posted 03-08-2021 04:59 PM

Thanks for the reply and advice, greatly appreciated! The garage right now is 56F but that cast is still cold. Got the grease off the cast iron, looked good. Used the Acetone (very little residual grease) and there’s more streaking than I’d like, which I’ll chalk up to the less than ideal temp. Going to Wax it now although I’m tempted to use Boeshield T9….but will likely go with the Wax. Going to be a pain to remove but it is what it is.

Thanks again for the valuable input, much appreciated!

Best,

Lyman

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Lazyman

6925 posts in 2438 days


#5 posted 03-08-2021 10:46 PM

I think that the wax will work better in cooler temperatures than the T9. It’s easy to get too much on there and it seems like it might take forever to to dry. I’ve only used T9 a couple of times and I don’t like to wait for it to dry so I stick with the wax.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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LGLDSR73

17 posts in 2817 days


#6 posted 03-09-2021 01:19 AM

Dry time is not that bad but you’re right, you do not want to get too much of the T-9 on the surface or it will take a long time to dry. Ultimately I went with J&J Paste Wax.

Thanks!

Lyman

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