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Forum topic by Mark posted 03-07-2021 11:57 PM 374 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mark

1071 posts in 3030 days


03-07-2021 11:57 PM

Afternoon all. Noob to the woodcarving forum. I do a small amount of carving, small pieces once in a while. I have an old but v/g condition set of X-Acto tools,the ones that came in a wooden box yeeears ago. They’re ok but I’d kinda like something a little nicer. And while I gottcha. I seem to have a heck of a time sharpening the damned things? Regular bench chisels, knives, plane irons etc…no problem. But those little guys just never seem to get there. Any thoughts would be great. Thanks.

-- Mark


11 replies so far

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

3296 posts in 3312 days


#1 posted 03-08-2021 12:10 AM

Mark, I have two sites to suggest to you:

marymaycarving.com

and

chippingaway.com

Mary May offers many instructional videos for beginners for free. Chippingaway has all the tools you will want.

-- Art

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

4518 posts in 4164 days


#2 posted 03-08-2021 02:51 AM

Yeah, X-Acto knives are great, but I would never try to sharpen them, given how easily they are replaced. Where do you expect to end up in the woodcarving spectrum? Chip carving, relief, chainsaw?

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

View Mark's profile

Mark

1071 posts in 3030 days


#3 posted 03-08-2021 05:15 AM

Thank you Art. Long time no hear from. I sincerely hope all is well in your world Art. Best wishes to you and yours.

Steve.. I’m kind of a form carver I guess. Plus a bit of chip carving. This is what I’m looking at now.

-- Mark

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1358 posts in 959 days


#4 posted 03-08-2021 03:53 PM

As in other human activities (camping, sports) the tools & equipment for carving have become very specialized to the tasks. Most carvers have given up X-Acto knives long ago. The finger tightened collets cannot hold up to the forces applied, so they turn and the blade slips. I strongly recommend that you shop for fixed blade knives, perhaps even those used by Pacific NW “First Nations” carvers. They’ve had thousands of years to perfect their knives.

-- Phil Allin - There are woodworkers and people who collect woodworking tools. The woodworkers have a chair to sit on that they made.

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Dark_Lightning

4518 posts in 4164 days


#5 posted 03-08-2021 04:14 PM

It was in my head but I didn’t write it, that it would only be a trial with X-Acto knives, to see if he likes it. A couple of the knives you (Phil) recommended wouldn’t break the bank, either.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

View Karda's profile

Karda

3050 posts in 1609 days


#6 posted 03-10-2021 08:57 PM

are you talking about the Xacto carving set that was a complete tool or are you referring the the replaceable blades

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Dark_Lightning

4518 posts in 4164 days


#7 posted 03-10-2021 11:27 PM

I was thinking of the handles with the replaceable blades. I was not aware until now, after your question, that X-Acto made “real” carving tools.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

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Karda

3050 posts in 1609 days


#8 posted 03-10-2021 11:38 PM

yea theare small tools not just size but they are short. The replace able blades are like utility knife blades quite hard so they have a good edge but very hard to sharpen. That why they are made to be disposable

View Bob Gnann's profile

Bob Gnann

58 posts in 728 days


#9 posted 03-11-2021 03:39 AM

I’ve been carving for about three years and I just want to relate some of my experiences. Not trying to be preaching.
First I would recommend you join a local carving group. And/or take some basic lessons. I go every week to our local senior center for our two hours of fun and learning. Carving is a great social experience. Have some fun!
Second don’t get caught up in buying lots of tools right off the bat. Most basic carving can be done with a few simple short knives. See what others are using, maybe ask to borrow for a few minutes. Don’t buy the big set. You’ll probably not use half of what is there.
Third, learn to sharpen your tools. It’s basic to every level of carving. The better you keep your tools sharpened the more you’ll enjoy carving. Sharpening by hand is my preferred method. Just saying.
Lastly, start off with some easy projects. A simple small character, a beer coaster with a logo, etc. Don’t try to tackle that masterpiece you saw somewhere. That took some one years to master . Everyone started out learning the basics first. Small successes will lead to bigger better results.
Oh, and always wear your safety gloves! Carving is not a blood sport!

-- Bob Gnann

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therealSteveN

7493 posts in 1629 days


#10 posted 03-11-2021 03:57 AM

I have some Feil brand chisels, they are nice, kinda pricey. In the past few years I have gotten some Stryi tools from the Ukraine. Prices are going up as they are now found by many to deliver some nice tools, for a bit less $$$$. I first noted them on Etsy, there are now several other brands at lower prices, I don’t know the value though, as I haven’t tried any of them past the Stryi chisels.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Karda's profile

Karda

3050 posts in 1609 days


#11 posted 03-11-2021 04:25 AM

some set are ok, I just bought a Yellowhammer set of 12. There is noting in this set that will not be useful. i agree there are some set, the cheap one that have questionable tool, I don’t usually by set, it is the same profiles that are in the Scaff 12 piece set. sharpening the tools is important but it is also important to know how to reprofile the tools. In thre set I got I have to reshape every tool before I can start to sharpen them. This is something the carving people don’t teach. Alexander Grobeietskyi does teach some in his video on sharpening a spoon gouge, but that is one tool what about the others

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