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Maximum re-coat time.

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Forum topic by AlaskaGuy posted 03-07-2021 11:28 PM 333 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AlaskaGuy

6474 posts in 3359 days


03-07-2021 11:28 PM

I have started applying General Finishes High Performance Top Coat to my sapele cabinet job. I bought the last of the stock the store here had. Starting to look like I may run short. They said they have more on the way, but it will be a few days before they get it. Thus, the question of maximum re-coat time.

I have search their website can’t seem to find the answer.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!


11 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

6925 posts in 2438 days


#1 posted 03-07-2021 11:42 PM

The only thing I could find was under maintenance. This would imply you can apply you can touch up so I would think you can apply at about any time?

”Future finishes or touch-ups may not adhere properly or perform as desired over a contaminated surface. Some contaminants, such as silicone, seep through finish into the wood and often cannot be removed.”

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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CWWoodworking

1657 posts in 1229 days


#2 posted 03-08-2021 12:33 AM

You will be fine. Sand in between coats.

I don’t think that particular finish burns into the previous anyway.

View 2Goober's profile

2Goober

37 posts in 652 days


#3 posted 03-08-2021 01:28 AM

I asked the folks at woodcraft the exact same question. They said the same thing that CWWOODWORKING said.

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Sark

402 posts in 1411 days


#4 posted 03-08-2021 01:36 AM

Yep, just sand between coats, which you should probably do anyway.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6474 posts in 3359 days


#5 posted 03-08-2021 02:20 AM

Thanks all for easing my mind. Kind of that I thought but wasn’t sure. I have used finishes that do have a maximum re-coat times. If I remember that was Target Coating EM-2000.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Sark

402 posts in 1411 days


#6 posted 03-08-2021 03:51 AM

One of my early spectacular finishing failures was when I did an entire kitchen in a cream colored conversion varnish. Conversion varnish is very hard and cannot be recoated. Unfortunately, the cabinets turned a sickly shade of green after I installed them at the customer’s house.

I was in a panic because I didn’t want to replace the cabinet doors, molding, trim, etc…and sanding everything to bare wood seemed like a horrible job. I had an emergency consult with a finishing expert who had helped me in the past. He assured me that If I sanded everything down with 240 grit and overcoated with General Finishes poly, then all would be fine. And so I did, and so he was right. Customer was happy and I dodged a bullet. If effect, the conversion varnish acted like a very tough primer.

Conclusion, mechanical adhesion works really well.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1657 posts in 1229 days


#7 posted 03-08-2021 10:55 AM



One of my early spectacular finishing failures was when I did an entire kitchen in a cream colored conversion varnish. Conversion varnish is very hard and cannot be recoated. Unfortunately, the cabinets turned a sickly shade of green after I installed them at the customer’s house.

I was in a panic because I didn’t want to replace the cabinet doors, molding, trim, etc…and sanding everything to bare wood seemed like a horrible job. I had an emergency consult with a finishing expert who had helped me in the past. He assured me that If I sanded everything down with 240 grit and overcoated with General Finishes poly, then all would be fine. And so I did, and so he was right. Customer was happy and I dodged a bullet. If effect, the conversion varnish acted like a very tough primer.

Conclusion, mechanical adhesion works really well.

- Sark

Why couldn’t you do the same thing with the CV?

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Sark

402 posts in 1411 days


#8 posted 03-08-2021 02:55 PM

I could have overcoated with CV, but I didn’t understand what had caused the problem in the first place and I was afraid of a repeat disaster. Also, some of the spraying had to be done in the customer’s home, and spraying CV in an enclosed kitchen didn’t appeal to me. Around that time, I wanted to move more towards water-based non-toxic finishes. This was the incident that got me to change.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1665 posts in 777 days


#9 posted 03-08-2021 02:59 PM



I could have overcoated with CV, but I didn’t understand what had caused the problem in the first place and I was afraid of a repeat disaster. Also, some of the spraying had to be done in the customer’s home, and spraying CV in an enclosed kitchen didn’t appeal to me. Around that time, I wanted to move more towards water-based non-toxic finishes. This was the incident that got me to change.

- Sark


Yes, but your comment was “Conversion varnish is very hard and cannot be recoated.”
This was incorrect, and is why CWW was asking.

View splintergroup's profile (online now)

splintergroup

4963 posts in 2273 days


#10 posted 03-08-2021 04:16 PM

There always seems to be a “small” window after a fresh coat of finish is applied and when another coat can be added without any prep work to the first coat needed (scuff sanding, etc. ) After that point, there usually is a minimum dry time for the first coat then various methods to prep it for a top coat.

For instance, the spray can poly I often use mentions that additional coats can be applied withing the first hour, after that there needs to be a 48 hour dry time and scuff sanding before the next coat.

Some catalyzed finishes cannot be recoated unless they are thoroughly scuffed to give the top coat something to bite into. Basically the cured surface is too smooth/dense for any top coat to adhere. These are the ones where you need to scuff every sq. inch to avoid peeling. Some require for a binder layer (primer/sealer) to applied first.

I believe every modern finish out there has the details in the instructions, certainly the professional finishes have information available for recoating (often considered a repair) .

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2771 posts in 3040 days


#11 posted 03-11-2021 04:30 PM

I use Target Coatings em9000 poly. There is a “burn in” window for it for next coats, and I think it is 24 hrs.

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