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Treating cast iron on new TS

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Forum topic by Wood_Scraps posted 03-07-2021 05:28 PM 404 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Wood_Scraps

106 posts in 69 days


03-07-2021 05:28 PM

Finally decided a good deal was never going to pop up in the used market around me, and bought a new Delta 36-725T2.

Putting everything together today. The instructions say that AFTER assembly, the ALL protectant on the cast iron table should be cleaned off, and wax (or similar) should be added.

My question is what about the sides of the table? Meaning, the portions where the fence rails and wings connect. They appear to have a protectant on them as well. Should I clean the whole top and sides first, then treat and assemble? Or should I leave the protectant on the sides of the table and just attach the rails/wings?

Regardless, my choice won’t inhibit function. But, I do want to ensure the sides of the cast iron table remain as rust free as possible. Obviously, once the rails and wings are attached, I won’t be able to clean the protectant off the adjoining sides of the table. Which is interesting because the instructions say to clean ALL of it off.

Hope that makes sense. Thanks in advance!


10 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5349 posts in 5011 days


#1 posted 03-07-2021 05:49 PM

Clean every side/edge/top. After this, assemble, wax, and put to work. The wax that is on the parts might prevent you from getting a good fit.

-- [email protected]

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1747 posts in 2700 days


#2 posted 03-07-2021 05:58 PM

I just wipe them, not trying to get the film off of the edges.

Nice looking saw. Let us know how it goes.

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Wood_Scraps

106 posts in 69 days


#3 posted 03-07-2021 05:58 PM



Clean every side/edge/top. After this, assemble, wax, and put to work. The wax that is on the parts might prevent you from getting a good fit.

- Bill White

That’s what I figured would make the most sense. Not sure how they would expect you to follow the instructions to clean off all the packaging protectant after attaching the rails as sides.

As far as retreating, I plan to use tuff glide. Have used it on all my guns for years. Safe for wood and plastics. Works wonderfully and leaves a nice dry film. But doesn’t contain silicone.

I’ll treat the sides before attaching anything. As it’s not viscous enough to cause any fit issues.

Thanks!

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Wood_Scraps

106 posts in 69 days


#4 posted 03-07-2021 06:28 PM



I just wipe them, not trying to get the film off of the edges.

Nice looking saw. Let us know how it goes.

- tvrgeek

Thanks! I’d suspect that method works perfectly well.

I think my primary hobby of guns has me a bit OCD about cleaning/lubing/protecting. After seeing all the rusted out junk on CL and Marketplace, I’m just going to assume any effort I make will be 99% more effective than the general population.

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Robert

4519 posts in 2531 days


#5 posted 03-07-2021 10:35 PM

Patina will develop no matter what. The best rust preventive is using the saw.

I recommend a thin kerf blade on those type saws with universal or direct drive motors, Check the splitter it if it’s full kerf you’ll need a different one.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Wood_Scraps

106 posts in 69 days


#6 posted 03-08-2021 01:19 AM



Patina will develop no matter what. The best rust preventive is using the saw.

I recommend a thin kerf blade on those type saws with universal or direct drive motors, Check the splitter it if it’s full kerf you’ll need a different one.

- Robert

Well, I guess calling it patina will make it a little more tolerable, lol.

I’m upgrading from a very old and underpowered Ryobi saw. So, already using a 50T Diablo TK combination blade. Will likely add a Glue Line Rip blade. Also in a TK. It did give some specifications in the manual on kerf and plate parameters. So will definitely do some homework if ever wanting to switch to a full kerf blade.

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Wood_Scraps

106 posts in 69 days


#7 posted 03-11-2021 06:16 PM

Had to make a trip out of town before I finished putting the saw together. Got it all assembled yesterday evening and spent some time cleaning all of the shipping preservative off of the table.

I will say the miter slots took a little time to get completely cleaned; given the recessed areas. But ultimately got it to where wiping with a fresh rag came up clean. Probably overkill.

Wiped everything down with my go-to Tuff Glide. Looks and feels awesome. The casting and machining were done very well. Excited to start using the thing.

View Jake229's profile

Jake229

62 posts in 453 days


#8 posted 03-13-2021 07:47 PM

I have been restoring old iron woodworking tools since getting sick. Makes me feel like I am accomplishing something productive. I have been using BOESHIELD T-9 SPRAY For my bare cast iron. Seems to work well. I also been using Johnson’s Paste Wax, on painted surfaces. Instead of stripping and painting those surfaces, I have been cleaning and putting a coat of wax there. I need to get photobucket working and share some of those pics. You will love your new saw! Congratulations!
Jake

-- Be safe out there

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Wood_Scraps

106 posts in 69 days


#9 posted 03-13-2021 11:04 PM



I have been restoring old iron woodworking tools since getting sick. Makes me feel like I am accomplishing something productive. I have been using BOESHIELD T-9 SPRAY For my bare cast iron. Seems to work well. I also been using Johnson’s Paste Wax, on painted surfaces. Instead of stripping and painting those surfaces, I have been cleaning and putting a coat of wax there. I need to get photobucket working and share some of those pics. You will love your new saw! Congratulations!
Jake

- Jake229

I’ve seen the T-9 stuff mentioned quite frequently. Initially I was thinking it was one of the same products from the gun cleaning world. Not sure which I was confusing it with, though.

I was considering wax. But, there’s the whole process of buffing and whatnot. The Tuff Glide is super easy to apply. Just as easy to retreat. And won’t harm anything on that saw, or the wood that makes its way across it. So I want that route.

Just about have it set up and ready to cut! Been dialing in the precision and ran into a snag that cost me an evening. Will probably start a dedicated thread to share the details so that anyone else purchasing this specific saw can benefit from my experience

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Lazyman

6925 posts in 2438 days


#10 posted 03-13-2021 11:22 PM

I tried the T-9 and did not really think it was any improvement over simple past wax, especially considering how expensive it is. It also takes longer to dry and the first time I used it I put too much on and had to wipe most of it off.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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