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Forum topic by johnnywyoming posted 03-07-2021 04:11 PM 447 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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johnnywyoming

15 posts in 1942 days


03-07-2021 04:11 PM

I am looking for opinions on electric nail guns. I need one, corded or battery, to nail wooden siding on the house as well as building bookcases, shelves, kitchen cabinet type jobs. Usually using 3/4 plywood.

-- Thank God for morons. Without them who would the rest of us have to blame things on?


23 replies so far

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Lazyman

6925 posts in 2438 days


#1 posted 03-07-2021 04:23 PM

I can’t really recommend a brand but I think you will want different kind of nailer for the different types of jobs you describe. For the indoor work, you will probably want a brad nailer which is often used instead of clamps for holding things together while waiting for glue to set or maybe a finish nailer. For the siding, you probably want one specifically designed for siding.

Do you have a compressor or do you need a self powered option? An electric gun will definitely limit the options. I don’t think I have ever seen an electric siding nailer. I would think that they would probably be too heavy for most pros to want to use?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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johnnywyoming

15 posts in 1942 days


#2 posted 03-07-2021 04:35 PM

Do not have a compressor at this point. Do not know if I would ever use one down the road so I am trying to keep expenses down. So, nailers are not common for siding work. Should I just use a manual hammer and nails?

-- Thank God for morons. Without them who would the rest of us have to blame things on?

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controlfreak

1964 posts in 652 days


#3 posted 03-07-2021 04:37 PM

I settled on Hitachi years ago after a lot of the trades I saw on job sites had them. Now Metabo and just picked up a 23 gauge pin nailer this morning to go with my framing, and two finish nailers. I only have the brad to get to round my set. So like above I think you will need more than one swiss army gun.

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controlfreak

1964 posts in 652 days


#4 posted 03-07-2021 04:38 PM



Do not have a compressor at this point. Do not know if I would ever use one down the road so I am trying to keep expenses down. So, nailers are not common for siding work. Should I just use a manual hammer and nails?

- johnnywyoming


I rarely see anyone swing a hammer on a job site anymore.

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Lazyman

6925 posts in 2438 days


#5 posted 03-07-2021 04:46 PM

Indoor finish work usually uses smaller recessed heads like brad or finish nailers but I think that the nails used by siding nailers usually have a head on them for more holding power because, depending upon the type of siding, you get more wood movement and you need a larger head to keep it in place. What type of siding are you planning to put up?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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johnnywyoming

15 posts in 1942 days


#6 posted 03-07-2021 04:52 PM

I am replacing rotted wood siding in places around the house with 7.125-in x 8-ft Unfinished Pine Shiplap. So it sounds like I will need two different types of nailers. That being the case, what are some good choices?

-- Thank God for morons. Without them who would the rest of us have to blame things on?

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bilyo

1345 posts in 2153 days


#7 posted 03-07-2021 05:03 PM

While I know nothing about them, I understand that fuel cartridge nail guns are a good alternative to air power. You might look into them.

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1thumb

313 posts in 3207 days


#8 posted 03-07-2021 05:08 PM



Do not have a compressor at this point. Do not know if I would ever use one down the road so I am trying to keep expenses down. So, nailers are not common for siding work. Should I just use a manual hammer and nails?

- johnnywyoming


Inexpensive compressor and nailguns would keep expenses down compared to 2-3 diff type of cordless nailers. W/o doing siding on a reg basis, I’d by a 15 ga angled nailed for siding instead of a gun strictly for siding. Then a brad gun for smaller trim type work. Those 2 and a compressor would be cheaper than a quality cordless nailer.

If it’s your house, back prime that siding and prime all cut ends b4 install

-- I actually have two thumbs. Both prehensile and opposing.

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1thumb

313 posts in 3207 days


#9 posted 03-07-2021 05:10 PM

Do not have a compressor at this point. Do not know if I would ever use one down the road so I am trying to keep expenses down. So, nailers are not common for siding work. Should I just use a manual hammer and nails?

- johnnywyoming

Don’t hammer and nail siding unless a masochist.

Inexpensive compressor and nailguns would keep expenses down compared to 2-3 diff type of cordless nailers. W/o doing siding on a reg basis, I d by a 15 ga angled nailed for siding instead of a gun strictly for siding. Then a brad gun for smaller trim type work. If bought on the cheap, those 2 and a compressor would be cheaper than a quality cordless nailer.

If it’s your house, back prime that siding and prime all cut ends b4 install
- 1thumb

-- I actually have two thumbs. Both prehensile and opposing.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1657 posts in 1229 days


#10 posted 03-07-2021 05:21 PM

I would recommend dewalt 16/18 gauge 20v. Its the best 18g ive owned. Had a ridged and bositch before the dewalt. Dewalt is the hands down winner.

My house has LP lap siding. All put on with a 16g battery dewalt. Worked great. We had straight line winds that ripped part of my neighbors roof off. My siding was fine so strength is not an issue.

One thing to consider if you go down this road, Dewalt 20v is a great battery system. Not only drills, saws, but weed trimmers as well. I will never own another gas powered weed trimmer.

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johnnywyoming

15 posts in 1942 days


#11 posted 03-07-2021 05:27 PM

So, if an air compressor and nailer would be a less expensive route, what are some of those recommendations?

Yes, my house, will prime siding back and ends.

-- Thank God for morons. Without them who would the rest of us have to blame things on?

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CWWoodworking

1657 posts in 1229 days


#12 posted 03-07-2021 05:35 PM



So, if an air compressor and nailer would be a less expensive route, what are some of those recommendations?

Yes, my house, will prime siding back and ends.

- johnnywyoming

On the low end, yes, you can get into a nailer/air compressor cheaper. But if you start gettting into a little bigger/better compressor and quality nailer, the price difference quickly goes away.

The only way i would buy into a air nailer system, would be to get a bigger compressor so I could use the compressor for other things.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

9015 posts in 3627 days


#13 posted 03-07-2021 06:06 PM

Narrow crown staplers work well too.
Senco, Milwaukee, Paslode, Dewalt etc.

Good luck.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

11136 posts in 4698 days


#14 posted 03-07-2021 06:14 PM

I’ve seen the Harbor Freight nailers prasised. I have some Hitachis (now Metabo) that have never let me down or jammed that I can recall.

Cordless nailers may be more costly but I imagine they hold some value on the second hand market if you want to do your job and sell the tool. Prestige tools tend to hold their value when used in a way that cheaper or more commonplace tools don’t.

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JohnDon

154 posts in 2220 days


#15 posted 03-07-2021 06:22 PM

Okay, I’ll be a naysayer and suggest that you might consider just going with hammer and nails. You say you are replacing some rotten boards, so I assume not you’re not residing your whole house. You aren’t in the same situation as a contractor for whom time is money, and he can amortize the cost of equipment over many projects. From what I’ve seen (not a professional!), siding nailers tend to be specific for one type/size nail, aka a one trick pony; a framing nail gun wouldn’t work well. If you want to go with a nailer, first determine what nail you want to use and go from there. You’ll probably spend more on a siding gun than on an inexpensive compressor.

That said, there are a lot of uses for a compressor beyond powering nail guns- finishing, blowing dust out of tools and dust collector canisters, inflating tires. As for specific nail guns, as a DIYer I’ve had good success with HF. You can build up a whole arsenal of assorted air guns for the price of one professional grade tool. Sure, they’re not the same quality, but fine for occasional use. Remember the warning: “Never buy anything from Harbor Freight that your livelihood or life depends on.”

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