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Crosscut with miter saw vs table saw

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Forum topic by coalcracker posted 03-06-2021 10:24 PM 1229 views 0 times favorited 66 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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coalcracker

38 posts in 784 days


03-06-2021 10:24 PM

I’ve recently acquired my first table saw. I’ve had a miter saw for a while are have made crosscuts on some fairly wide boards with satisfactory results. However, when I watch project videos on youtube it seems many use the tablesaw (often with a crosscut sled) for even narrow boards.

Is there a rule of thumb for when to use a miter saw vs table saw for crosscuts?

In a possible future project, for example, I may be crosscutting boards that are 1x- or 2x-, 10” or 12” wide. I could do these on the miter, but is there a compelling reason to use table saw?


66 replies so far

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controlfreak

1986 posts in 657 days


#1 posted 03-06-2021 10:49 PM

A well made sled is the bomb. The only time it gets to lacking is when cutting long stock. But long stock is not often very wide. The wider the board the more you are into a slider and they seem to have more error from movement. I have a chop saw but removed it due to space limits. Now that it is gone I don’t miss it. I think of it as a framing saw that is loud and a dust machine. Waiting to do a mitre box rehab to do it manually when I need that cut. Not sure if this helps but from a tiny shop perspective it is what it is.

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CWWoodworking

1664 posts in 1234 days


#2 posted 03-06-2021 10:49 PM

If you get satisfactory results using a miter saw, keep using it.

Sliding miter saws are somewhat notorious for inconsistent results. Especially in cheaper models.

Table saw/sleds once dialed in are perfect every time.

I recently bought a delta cruiser miter saw. It’s perfect over 12”. I wouldn’t hesitate to use it. But my previous saws were finicky with that wide of cut.

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tvrgeek

1769 posts in 2704 days


#3 posted 03-06-2021 11:29 PM

Precision and dust control.
Miter saws are construction tools. Table saws are woodworking tools.

Sleds, supports. but sometimes you are working with boards too long and are clumsy. On a TS, never do anything that feels uncomfortable or awkward. I take big things to size outside with my circ or miter saw, then bring it in for trim.

I hope CW has success with that Delta. Looks cool as does the Bosch but mixed reviews on precision.

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Rich

6779 posts in 1645 days


#4 posted 03-06-2021 11:51 PM


Miter saws are construction tools. Table saws are woodworking tools.

- tvrgeek

Here we go again… I call BS on that one. So will anyone here who has a quality miter saw and knows how to square it (like I do). My 5-cut method got it down to under 0.001” per inch. Additionally, I can swing it right to 45º and make a cut, then swing it left to 45º and cut for a flawless 90º miter joint.

On LeeRoy’s mirror frame which was something like 3 foot by 10 foot, using his miter saw, it turned out square to within 1/16” measuring across corners.

So, I wish this myth would stop being propagated. It is just that—a myth.

Shoot, I bet you even hate combination blades.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Tony_S

1458 posts in 4138 days


#5 posted 03-07-2021 12:11 AM


Miter saws are construction tools. Table saws are woodworking tools.

- tvrgeek

Here we go again… I call BS on that one. So will anyone here who has a quality miter saw and knows how to square it (like I do). My 5-cut method got it down to under 0.001” per inch. Additionally, I can swing it right to 45º and make a cut, then swing it left to 45º and cut for a flawless 90º miter joint.

On LeeRoy s mirror frame which was something like 3 foot by 10 foot, using his miter saw, it turned out square to within 1/16” measuring across corners.

So, I wish this myth would stop being propagated. It is just that—a myth.

Shoot, I bet you even hate combination blades.

- Rich

I call BS with you…100%. Tune it, keep a SHARP quality blade in it, and learn how to use it properly.
As for the combination blade, one bit of blather was (rough quote) ‘only hack’s use combination blades’. lol…

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

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pottz

16199 posts in 2040 days


#6 posted 03-07-2021 12:17 AM

i agree with both rich and tony,except i usually use my ras for cross cuts so, much easier than using a sled on a ts.so as said if your miter saw is working why change.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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Rich

6779 posts in 1645 days


#7 posted 03-07-2021 12:28 AM


i agree with both rich and tony,except i usually use my ras for cross cuts so, much easier than using a sled on a ts.so as said if your miter saw is working why change.

- pottz

I’d use that too, if I had one. I’d kill to have my dad’s old DeWalt from the ‘50s. Someone posted a photo on here of an identical saw. It was green with white speckled paint. Those were the days.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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mel52

2044 posts in 1320 days


#8 posted 03-07-2021 01:00 AM

I use both frequently depending on what I need to cut. I have both dialed in pretty good, ok, REAL good. I, like Rich, use the five cut method to tune them in. My friends think I am sometimes anal about doing all this, most of them think a cut is just a cut. That’s why none of them are allowed to use my tools. My blades are kept sharp and clean which also helps. Mel

-- MEL, Kansas

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Rich

6779 posts in 1645 days


#9 posted 03-07-2021 01:05 AM


I use both frequently depending on what I need to cut. I have both dialed in pretty good, ok, REAL good. I, like Rich, use the five cut method to tune them in. My friends think I am sometimes anal about doing all this, most of them think a cut is just a cut. That s why none of them are allowed to use my tools. My blades are kept sharp and clean which also helps. Mel

- mel52

I think a consensus is forming.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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pottz

16199 posts in 2040 days


#10 posted 03-07-2021 01:09 AM


I use both frequently depending on what I need to cut. I have both dialed in pretty good, ok, REAL good. I, like Rich, use the five cut method to tune them in. My friends think I am sometimes anal about doing all this, most of them think a cut is just a cut. That s why none of them are allowed to use my tools. My blades are kept sharp and clean which also helps. Mel

- mel52

I think a consensus is forming.

- Rich


yeah, that the miter saw is not just a contractors tool,nonsense!

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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Robert

4522 posts in 2536 days


#11 posted 03-07-2021 01:30 AM

It all depends on the miter saw. I am not impressed with my Bosch I go back to a table saw sled when I want it dead on, no questions asked.

I’ve aligned it and aligned it till a I sick if aligning it, on any given cut, it might be square and it might not. Plastic indexing levers and wobbly arbors don’t help.

Regardless,sliding miters have inherent inaccuracy.

It pains me to say the cheap 10” Metabo clicks in solidly and a Imdont have to worry about return to 90. $200 saw and it’s right there maybe better than a $600 one.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Rich

6779 posts in 1645 days


#12 posted 03-07-2021 01:33 AM


Regardless,sliding miters have inherent inaccuracy.

- Robert

Crappy ones do. Pretty much all crappy tools are inaccurate.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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pottz

16199 posts in 2040 days


#13 posted 03-07-2021 01:36 AM


Regardless,sliding miters have inherent inaccuracy.

- Robert

Crappy ones do. Pretty much all crappy tools are inaccurate.

- Rich


right,even a crappy cheap sledge hammer wont last and do what is made for.so what are we comparing here?

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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SMP

3811 posts in 961 days


#14 posted 03-07-2021 01:41 AM


yeah, that the miter saw is not just a contractors tool,nonsense!

- pottz

To be fair, out of the box it kind of is. If you buy the dewalt from a big box store it comes with a contractor blade, its tuned “enough for framing”, and the insert is usually out of plane with the tables. But swap out the blade and spend an hour pr so tuning and its a whole other animal.

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CWWoodworking

1664 posts in 1234 days


#15 posted 03-07-2021 01:48 AM

The only time I had a real problem with accuracy on my cheap sliders was with large 8/4 boards. I usually rough cut, ripped them down, and recut.

My biggest complaint was with durability. I’m not for sure if I’m cursed or I just used them that much. 2 different saws crapped out in 4 years.

My new delta is perfect across 12”. I measured and used every square/method I can think off when setting it up. I couldn’t cut it better with a table saw.

Just hope it holds up.

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