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Chipped grinding wheel - bad to use the other wheel?

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Forum topic by ColoradoBrian posted 03-04-2021 06:00 PM 662 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ColoradoBrian

4 posts in 121 days


03-04-2021 06:00 PM

After sharpening a few plane blades this weekend I noticed the fine grit wheel has a chip in it. I can’t identify anything specific that would have caused it and the grinder still runs smooth. But I sense it’s time to replace that wheel. I’m curious if it’s dangerous to start the grinder. Could I use the other wheel while I save up for the CBN wheel I’ve always wanted?

-- They've done studies, you know. 60% of the time, it works every time.


10 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5349 posts in 5016 days


#1 posted 03-04-2021 06:53 PM

I would NOT use that wheel under any circumstance. DANGER WILL ROGERS!

-- [email protected]

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Fred Hargis

6926 posts in 3548 days


#2 posted 03-04-2021 07:02 PM

It sounds like your question is whether you can run the grinder and grind on the opposite side. What might happen is the chipped wheel (if the chip caused a crack) is the wheel would shatter while running. So that would be the danger. if the grinder is running smooth, I wouldn’t be afraid to use the other side…..but that’s me, and I suspect the safety police would object. What about just removing the chipped wheel and continue to use the grinder?

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1764 posts in 2704 days


#3 posted 03-04-2021 07:53 PM

REPLACE IMMEDIATLLY. Do not spin it up. You can run with just one wheel.

Amazon can get you a wheel tomorrow.

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HokieKen

17310 posts in 2194 days


#4 posted 03-04-2021 08:11 PM

Rap the wheel (off the grinder) with a screwdriver handle. If it rings, it’s solid. If it thuds, it’s not. I wouldn’t worry about running it personally. If the wheel is solid, I’d take a dressing stick and grind that chunk out and shape it to a radius or a V profile. No sense wasting a good wheel if it’s sound.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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ColoradoBrian

4 posts in 121 days


#5 posted 03-05-2021 01:47 AM

<<< What about just removing the chipped wheel and continue to use the grinder? >>>
Doh, I can’t believe that didn’t occur to me. Definitely going that route. It’s just a cheap-o ‘fine’ grit wheel that came with the grinder. I don’t even use it much. It’s a boat anchor now. But I will smack the hell out of it w/ a screw driver to see this ringing sound you speak of. Thanks all.

-- They've done studies, you know. 60% of the time, it works every time.

View SMP's profile

SMP

3810 posts in 961 days


#6 posted 03-05-2021 03:02 AM

Grinding to a 45 point is a very useful wheel

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

1149 posts in 442 days


#7 posted 03-05-2021 03:13 AM

Wear your full face shield and Carharrt or equivalent jacket for reshaping. Not a problem if there are no cracks other than the chip. I do realize that there are many with strong risk aversion verging on panic, often without the common sense to back it up. Risk tolerance, after assessing the actual problem and checking as suggested above is something you need to decide. I would personally have no issues reshaping after determining there were no through cracks. Removing the wheel if it’s a cheapie is a very good suggestion though.

-- Darrel

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Bob Gnann

58 posts in 728 days


#8 posted 03-05-2021 03:26 PM

That looks like a standard size and grit wheel that should be easy to find. I worked in industrial supply for many years, including selling abrasives and grinding products. DON’T USE THIS WHEEL! A trip to the emergency room or the eye surgeon far out weighs the cost of a new wheel. Search industrial accidents grinding / abrasives to see some nasty pictures.
In the world of abrasives the old saying you get what you pay for definitely applies. Not only with final results but also with product safety. Replace with a good quality name brand, not necessarily the cheapest import.

-- Bob Gnann

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Bob Gnann

58 posts in 728 days


#9 posted 03-05-2021 03:26 PM

That looks like a standard size and grit wheel that should be easy to find. I worked in industrial supply for many years, including selling abrasives and grinding products. DON’T USE THIS WHEEL! A trip to the emergency room or the eye surgeon far out weighs the cost of a new wheel. Search industrial accidents grinding / abrasives to see some nasty pictures.
In the world of abrasives the old saying you get what you pay for definitely applies. Not only with final results but also with product safety. Replace with a good quality name brand, not necessarily the cheapest import.

-- Bob Gnann

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1764 posts in 2704 days


#10 posted 03-05-2021 03:45 PM

Good wheels are worth it. Run much cooler. Last longer.

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