LumberJocks

Not what I expected

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by david2011 posted 03-03-2021 10:34 AM 365 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View david2011's profile

david2011

137 posts in 4759 days


03-03-2021 10:34 AM

I’m building a mobile cabinet base for my old 13” Jet drill press. I didn’t want to cut into a full 4×8 sheet of ply for the false drawer fronts so I bought an allegedly 2’x4’x3/4” piece of “Sande” ply from Home Depot. I expected to have the false fronts cut out, edge banded and installed in short order. Dang, you, Murphy! The 2’ dimension turned out to be 23-3/4” and I needed a finished width of 23-7/8”, expecting to trim 1/16” off of each side to get my final width.

“No problem,” said I to myself. I’ll just cut it down to 23-1/2 and add some solid wood edge banding. I grabbed a nearby piece of what was supposed to be teak, a little over an inch square (I bought a good amount of teak many years ago and this piece was in the lot.) It looked like the rest of the lot of teak which was all rough sawn. I’ve owned boats with teak trim for 30+ years so I’m not a stranger to the wood. I cut off a piece a hair longer than the plywood to be edge banded and took it to the jointer.

I was surprised at how hard it was to joint but two passes gave a nice finish and one pass with the new surface on the fence had it nicely squared. —But it didn’t smell like teak. It didn’t rip like teak. It didn’t plane like teak. Turns out that I had a piece of white oak in the lot of teak. I haven’t seen any white oak lumber since I was a kid and this was the first time I had machined any. Now I understand why it makes such a great workbench. That stuff is HARD.

-- David


6 replies so far

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2492 posts in 1640 days


#1 posted 03-03-2021 08:10 PM

You gotta understand that the 2×2 and 2×4 sheets are cutdowns from full 48” x 96” sheets. Saw kerf knocks the sub pieces to 1/4” undersize. This is clearly listed under the “Actual Dimensions” heading in the Specifications: portion of the web page.

I don’t really understand how you can confuse white oak for teak?!

White oak is a little hard, jatoba (Brazilian Cherry), rock maple, ipe, etc. are all a lot harder.

Google “Janka scale”


Janka scale has white oak at 30% harder than teak.
For real fun try ipe or ironwood!

I work with exotics almost exclusively. Jatoba and purpleheart are my go-to woods for general work.

Here is an Easter project out of purpleheart and yellow heart.


Purple and yellow are traditional easter colors.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View david2011's profile

david2011

137 posts in 4759 days


#2 posted 03-03-2021 09:04 PM

Madmark, those dovetails are incredible!

As I explained, I purchased a large amount of rough sawn teak. This wood has been in my possession for at least 25 years and the guy I got it from had it for quite a while as well. The surfaces are well oxidized. The exterior appearance of the piece was identical to the rest of the lot. Same color, same texture.

I’m familiar with the Janka scale but I don’t “Google” ANYTHING. Google is the biggest data mining organization in the world outside of governments. https://duckduckgo.com/

-- David

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2492 posts in 1640 days


#3 posted 03-03-2021 09:47 PM

Glad you like them. With the Fast-Joint Mini they’re fast and easy to cut. Read my review HERE

Did you hear about the search engine just for jokes? ... Giggle

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

1145 posts in 438 days


#4 posted 03-04-2021 12:13 AM

Once you get into African Blackwood or Snakewood, “really hard” will seem exponentially different. White oak is pretty easy on tools compared to teak with a higher silica content. I like purpleheart and wenge but the slivers are monumental!

-- Darrel

View david2011's profile

david2011

137 posts in 4759 days


#5 posted 03-04-2021 09:05 AM

It’s amazing how hard balsa is on sharp edges. It also has a high silica content and dulls blades quickly. Being relatively soft, that’s a catch-22. If the blade is dull it will crush instead of cut.

-- David

View david2011's profile

david2011

137 posts in 4759 days


#6 posted 03-04-2021 09:11 AM

Here are photos of the teak and white oak. Now that I know one is oak it’s easier to see but as with any wood, there are variations in the appearance of teak as well. Between variations and not expecting oak in the batch of teak I just didn’t expect the oak.

Rough:

After machining:

-- David

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com