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New TS - Looking to spend $1500

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Forum topic by RedcarWW posted 03-03-2021 02:24 AM 604 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RedcarWW

18 posts in 72 days


03-03-2021 02:24 AM

Looking for options to replace my undersized Rockwell/Delta contractor saw. Top of the list based on my thought was originally the Grizzly G01023RL. Now I am looking for other options. What other options do others recommend? It can be a contractor saw or a cabinet saw. + or – $200.

Thanks in advance

-- Jason Redcar WoodWorks


25 replies so far

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SMP

3811 posts in 961 days


#1 posted 03-03-2021 02:35 AM

I’d probably go Grizz or One of the Harvey saws in that range.

View azwoodworker's profile

azwoodworker

59 posts in 2837 days


#2 posted 03-03-2021 02:47 AM

Look into the Shop Fox 2 HP 10in Hybrid Cabinet Table Saw. The 2 or 3 HP will be my next table saw. I have a Delta Cabinet saw that is a good saw I picked up second-hand, but missing some parts like the riving knife and blade guard, and want to use it dedicated to Dadoes and add a second saw. The Shop Fox is a good brand. I love my Show Fox 8 inch jointer. It is just a beast. I put that through a lot of work, in terms of my Jet 15 in planner it out-produces it. The price is about 1500 for 2hp, and 3 hp is up around 2,100. Almost done paying off the kid’s cars so wanting to get one soon. Have a look at the Shop Fox they make good tools.

Contractor saws just don’t have the power like a cabinet saw. I have had some and when I upgraded to the cabinet saw for building Mantels with Hardwood boards and hardwood plywood it was a vast improvement on the clean cuts on the ply. No tear out just crisp cuts.

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xedos

259 posts in 356 days


#3 posted 03-03-2021 03:13 AM

What is undersized about your saw ?

Are you just looking for more rip capacity / width ? You could accomplish that with a new fence and aux. side table for a couple of hundred bucks.

View MikeJ70's profile

MikeJ70

84 posts in 1002 days


#4 posted 03-03-2021 03:25 AM

I’m in the same boat and so far what I’ve found in that price range for a cabinet saw with 3hp is the Grizzly you listed or the Harvey (they also have a 2hp model with a larger table). There are several posts floating around on here about the Harvey’s so just do a search. If you want the safety of the Sawstop you can get their contractor saw with 1-3/4 hp motor in that price range. Powermatic has a nice contractor saw in that price range too.

You can always look for an older cabinet saw on Craigslist and Ebay and there are a few other online sites that you can get used machinery from. They will be lacking some of the safety features the new saws have, so if that is important to you then you can always look at some of the aftermarket devices that are available.

If you are like me you will research the heck out of it until you go cross-eyed and then you still won’t know which one to get. Lucky for me I don’t have the funds yet so I am still just in the dreaming stage. Good Luck.

-- MikeJ

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Madmark2

2506 posts in 1643 days


#5 posted 03-03-2021 03:26 AM

Cabinet saw with ZCI and incra fence & miter gauge. Add a digital height gauge with a good carbide blade and you’ll have a lean, mean, cutting machine.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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RedcarWW

18 posts in 72 days


#6 posted 03-03-2021 03:38 AM



What is undersized about your saw ?

Are you just looking for more rip capacity / width ? You could accomplish that with a new fence and aux. side table for a couple of hundred bucks.

- xedos


My current max fence is 24”, and even that is a stretch as I am at the end of the bar. It’s an older saw. No safety at all or dust collection. I need to check the HP of the motor as well. I did look into adding the INCRA fence to it to correct the fence issue. However; I felt a new saw would make more sense.

-- Jason Redcar WoodWorks

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Woodbum

950 posts in 4121 days


#7 posted 03-03-2021 10:26 AM

From personal experience I can recommend the Grizzly 1023 series. I have owned mine for 12 years and am very pleased with the performance and durability, not to mention the attractive price point. I replaced the arbor bearings and belts last winter, lubricated and recalibrated everything and it is just like new again. I do not think you will be disappointed if you decide to pull the trigger on this great saw. Grizzly has excellent customer service , that is more than willing to answer your questions with a live human on the phone. Good Luck, Work Safely and Have Fun.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

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Axis39

460 posts in 652 days


#8 posted 03-03-2021 02:45 PM

I moved from a Ridgid portable contractor’s saw (that i used for more than 10 years, professionally), to a Shop Fox 1837. I’ve owned it almost a year and a half now and use it constantly.

I love the saw. It has performed almost flawlessly. Has enough power for everything I’ve thrown at it so far, adjustments are clean, smooth, and accurate.

However, the one shortfall for me is the fence. It’s solid, and once positioned, it is firm and accurate. But, there’s a lot of movement when tightening the handle down. It’s very similar to my old Ridgid, in function. So, I’ve decided to upgrade to an Incra TS-LS Joinery set up (I have a router table attached to the right side of my TS). I ordered it back in January and won’t see it until June. Most folks would be perfectly happy with the fence on the Shop Fox. Like I said, it’s solid. It does it’s job. But, I am looking forward to not having to tap that last little bit almost every time.

My set up is slightly over your budget, but I think the regular TS-LS might still fit?

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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tvrgeek

1769 posts in 2704 days


#9 posted 03-03-2021 02:58 PM

See my comments on the Harvey. Very happy with my C-300-30 ( I use an MDF fence face, so closer to 33 inch rip)

Go ahead and buy a “real” saw or you will want to upgrade again later. Sure, there was nothing my Ridgid could not do, but I sure like my full size 3 HP cabinet.

Fences seem to be a religious topic. My Ridgid was dead on and secure. Others had issues. My new C-300 steel T seems fine after a few tweaks. Features of the Incra are great, but too many comments about it not locking square. Too many fit and finish complaints about Vega. SuperCoolTools seems to be widely liked. Old Biesmyer was well respected, but seems Delta cheapened it.

Older saws do not have riving knives. Your choice. I don’t know where all the old Unisaws and PM66’s that are supposed to be out there are hiding. Great saws of the older generation. Don’t even see many older Delta Contractor saws. It was the top of that class. But when you get a “real” saw for $1500, why settle for less?

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Madmark2

2506 posts in 1643 days


#10 posted 03-03-2021 03:27 PM

Incra not locking square? Never heard of that. Can you link to your source? If its not locking square something is broken or mis-installed.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Jim2020's profile

Jim2020

57 posts in 294 days


#11 posted 03-03-2021 10:32 PM

The old Unisaws are out there, you just have to look for them. Just checked e-bay, there are 13 used ones currently listed. None seem like an outstanding buy right now, but “best offer” price is sometimes way different from listed price. The problem with these old saws is that you have to be ready to suffer some inconvenience buying them, and putting them back into service.

I bought one a year ago, 1951 version, cost me $250. Problem was getting it to me. Well, I watched for listings somewhere within reasonable distance, and found one 150 mi. away, made an offer, and it was mine. Spent a day picking it up. Was in and old guy’s barn. He had a bale fork on his tractor, and lifted it with that and put it in the back of my truck.

Let me tell you it was not a pretty thing. Jerry-rigged switch, old jet fence, missing the cabinet door, and one of the hand wheel locks. But it ran just fine. It’s a 1725 rpm bullet motor machine. Long story – short: I spent about a month and maybe $300 putting it back in shape (Since I had it appart, I replaced the bearing and the arbor-probably wouldn’t have had to replace either). Then I built my own Beismeyer type fence. I now have a really nice cabinet saw. Learned all about it in the re-hab.

Now I enjoy working on, and building tools, so the project was fun for me. Someone else, maybe not. New these saws cost somewhere between $2500 to $3000. The new ones don’t match the build quality and robustness of these. You can’t expect to buy a pristine Unisaw for $600, but if you’re willing to shop, wait, and do some repair and rebuild work yourself, you can end up with a quality saw at a pretty reasonable price. Jim

View StarBright's profile

StarBright

38 posts in 342 days


#12 posted 03-03-2021 10:47 PM

Go ahead and buy a “real” saw or you will want to upgrade again later. Sure, there was nothing my Ridgid could not do, but I sure like my full size 3 HP cabinet.

This is so true. Think of this this way: there isn’t anything you cannot do with hand tools. Think of history’s most amazing carpentry pieces. I’m talking about violins that Stradivari, Amati, and Guarneri built. Or the great basilicas and cathedrals of Europe. Everything was done by hand it just took ridiculously long periods of time compared to what good power tools are capable of. Power tools don’t take craftsmanship out of the work, they just let you do more of it.

Lower end saws will get the job done but they can get frustrating quickly. When Craftsman tools took a dive in the late 90s/early 2000s there was a lot of play in the blade. You would get a new table saw set up and spend all the time to square the fence (and re-square it for every cut) but it didn’t matter because there was too much play in the blade and nothing came out square within tolerance.

You’ll also want something big enough for safe ripping. Maybe that’s not too big of an issue if you’re going to build a cabinet for the saw with a large enough outfeed table. There are a lot of options here.

Older saws do not have riving knives. Your choice. I don’t know where all the old Unisaws and PM66’s that are supposed to be out there are hiding. Great saws of the older generation. Don’t even see many older Delta Contractor saws. It was the top of that class. But when you get a “real” saw for $1500, why settle for less?

All good points. I am noticing that a lot of people are either keeping them or passing them down to their kids or someone in the family. If you live in the rust belt they do pop up at reasonable prices from time to time. But the prices are climbing.

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Sark

404 posts in 1416 days


#13 posted 03-04-2021 06:38 AM

I bought a used Unisaw for $700. 3HP cabinet saw. Works great. Main drawback is does not have a riving knife. How big a handicap is that for you? But for that price I got a machine that tunes up nicely, has plenty of power, lots of accessory items from 3rd party manufacturers, one that runs smoothly with not excessive vibration. Will replace with a SawStop one of these days. So if you can get a “real saw” for $700, why spend more?

View RedcarWW's profile

RedcarWW

18 posts in 72 days


#14 posted 03-05-2021 02:20 AM

A close friend also swears by Unisaws. I’ve looked at some on Ebay. Below is a Unisaw in forsale in my state. My dad put in 3 phase for his milling machine and older lathe. That is not an issue.

“ROCKWELL 10 UNISAW W/FENCE AND MITER GAGE

As for whether an older is the route to go, I don’t know. I’m inclined to look at the Sawstop contractor saw or go with the Grizzly. Otherwise I’m looking at buying the Unisaw and purchasing the Incra for a better fence. It still does not have the riving knife. I’m also not sure about the dust collection of the Unisaw.

-- Jason Redcar WoodWorks

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bobfromsanluis

46 posts in 1727 days


#15 posted 03-05-2021 04:12 AM

I had a Craftsman contractor saw for many years, never had the electrical capacity for a 220 volt saw. When the tilting screw wouldn’t allow me to get to 45º for ripping, I knew it was time to move on. Found a used Delta 36-5000 for $200, didn’t have the factory base, no blade guard and the fence had issues. Spent some time and money (not much) and got it running fairly well. Upgraded the wiring finally to have 220 available, a few months later a PM66 came available in my area for $800. The saw had been in a school setting, the previous owner had swapped out the 3 phase motor and switch, added a Biesemeyer fence with 30” rails. Sold the Delta for $500, bought a motor cover from Bell Plastics, bought the SharkGuard blade guard with splitter and D/C hook up, I’m good to go. If I hadn’t found the Powermatic, I would have seriously considered the Grizzly, the riving knife on the Delta was a game changer, am happy with the ShardGuard.

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