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longer jointer infeed or outfeed tables?

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Forum topic by Loren posted 03-03-2021 01:24 AM 547 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Loren

11141 posts in 4700 days


03-03-2021 01:24 AM

I’ve thought for a long time that a long outfeed table was the secret to jointing longer stock. I even made a 30” outfeed extension for an older jointer and got decent results. I noticed though that on pro jointers from Martin and others the infeed table is longer.

The reason I ask is I have a cast iron extension for my jointer/planer and I’ve used it in both positions but I’m wondering which is best.


12 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3757 posts in 2850 days


#1 posted 03-03-2021 01:55 AM

I like a longer outfeed side in the past I’ve added length to my outfeed. Right now my jointer has same length on both sides . 48 or 49 something like that.
I’ve also noticed the same thing Martin has longer infeed. Maybe it’s because the outfeed has optional outfeed attachment. I also think they are ugly looking machines both color and design.
Good Luck Loren

-- Aj

View azwoodworker's profile

azwoodworker

59 posts in 2834 days


#2 posted 03-03-2021 03:12 AM

I mill longboards and only use a roller stand on the outfeed side. Generally, you’re guiding the wood on the infeed side. I get pretty darn close to perfect with 10 ft boards but I always then place them in wood clamps on the bench and do a final flattening with a long jointer plane. I also use a trick an old carp friend of mine showed me using a 1 1/2 unistrut, to lay on top to get it perfect. Sped up my progress immensely when I was putting out mantels and jointing up knotted alder for tops and fronts.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

20618 posts in 4728 days


#3 posted 03-03-2021 03:54 AM



I mill longboards and only use a roller stand on the outfeed side. Generally, you re guiding the wood on the infeed side. I get pretty darn close to perfect with 10 ft boards but I always then place them in wood clamps on the bench and do a final flattening with a long jointer plane. I also use a trick an old carp friend of mine showed me using a 1 1/2 unistrut, to lay on top to get it perfect. Sped up my progress immensely when I was putting out mantels and jointing up knotted alder for tops and fronts.

- azwoodworker

You use a 1 1/2 unistrut as a straight edge?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View AMZ's profile

AMZ

301 posts in 441 days


#4 posted 03-03-2021 10:45 AM


I mill longboards and only use a roller stand on the outfeed side. Generally, you re guiding the wood on the infeed side. I get pretty darn close to perfect with 10 ft boards but I always then place them in wood clamps on the bench and do a final flattening with a long jointer plane. I also use a trick an old carp friend of mine showed me using a 1 1/2 unistrut, to lay on top to get it perfect. Sped up my progress immensely when I was putting out mantels and jointing up knotted alder for tops and fronts.

- azwoodworker

You use a 1 1/2 unistrut as a straight edge?

- TopamaxSurvivor


I’m curious as well about the Unistrut!

I have two jointers, one a 70s vintage 8” Delta, with a long bed and the other a 6” Grizzly clone of the Delta “paralellogram” style. I can get trash or perfect from either, depending upon technique (I generally take a swipe or two with my #7 jointer on all jointed edges).

My trick? Fence to outfeed table must be square, and I use a Magswitch featherboard (outfeed table)to keep the stock against the fence, leaving me to focus on keeping stock pressed downward on the outfeed.

Focus must be on the outfeed table!

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1749 posts in 2701 days


#5 posted 03-03-2021 11:35 AM

I found Unistrut to not be that strait. Handy stuff, but not a straightedge.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6920 posts in 3545 days


#6 posted 03-03-2021 12:45 PM

I’ve always thought a longer infeed was more important, as mentioned above that’s what’s guiding the workpiece into the cutters. the outfeed can be supported with a stand/rollers/whatever.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View jkm312's profile

jkm312

86 posts in 455 days


#7 posted 03-04-2021 01:13 AM

Loren

Never really thought about it till you posed the question. I’ve a Grizzly 6” 604. The indeed table is 6 inches longer than the outfield table. The fence is 36” long and is split in half over the arc of the knives. On the really long stock I use rollers on both end of the jointer and seems to work well for me. I do however think a longer and higher fence on the infeed side of the jointer would be helpful to better control the feed of stock into the knives.

A good question and interesting replies.

View azwoodworker's profile

azwoodworker

59 posts in 2834 days


#8 posted 03-09-2021 08:44 AM

AMZ Sorry for the delay, went off on things. On the unistrut. I use a 3/4 inch thick by 1 1/2 I think wide 11 ft long. This is dead-on straight. I keep it securely stored when not in use so does not get accidentally bent. I was doing a boatload of mantels that were distressed and stained usually out of Knotty Alder. I needed an accurate and fast system without frustration to get perfect jointed edges. I set up two wooden hand clamps clamped on the bench at 6 feet apart. I normally started with 10 ft boards (I made these into sheets 3 ft wide 10 long and then cut to mantel size the order that came in Boards were top and front and ply on the bottom). I place the board into the clamps vertical and then place unistrut on top and sight for gaps. Many times I start with sighting the gaps. That way I can see if it is cupped one way or another. If the center is proud I then run the center on the jointer to get the center down, If either end was I bring that end down and then resight and then run the whole board on the jointer. As these are usually 10 ft boards before complete milling to the size they are heavy and unwieldy. I have a long jointer, 8 in, and use the rollers at the off-feed side. I joint the edge. However, with longboards, it is not perfect but damn close which is why I finish off with a long jointer plane. As I was making them for another company that sold them I had to be accurate on everything.

After I know I am darn close it goes back into the clamps and put the unistrut back on and sometimes mark the gaps with a pencil. I then use my most accurate jointer plane with my thumb supporting everything from the side and do the shallow passes I need till there are no gaps. The system works every time. I don’t have a big shop so can’t make infed/outfed tables as with all the different projects the machines move around. Ensuring the jointer is accurate is a must, jointing I pretty confident I can get a perfect joint.

I made a wall mount clamping system that can clamp up 11 ft by 5 feet. This clamps both top to bottom and sides.

For those that mentioned unistrut is not straight that can be the case with taller unistrut but the 3/4 inch I found them dead perfect provided someone did not sit on it. Here are some results.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2348 posts in 3845 days


#9 posted 03-09-2021 01:50 PM

The 7/8 thick strut is bent more often then the 1 5/8 square. The ends of a piece can be deformed when the strut is sheared to length during manufacturing. And there are various guages of strut, some so thin that it can bend just by picking it up. As an electrician, I have used thousands of feet of strut over the past 40 plus years. It is used daily on the job. I use it for for many things in the woodshop, such as shelves and lumber racks.

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

458 posts in 1011 days


#10 posted 03-09-2021 02:56 PM

Better to have more infeed than outfeed. I have 48” on each table but more wouldn’t hurt.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7468 posts in 1626 days


#11 posted 03-09-2021 05:05 PM

I too like more solid infeed support, and find on long stock a simple roller stand can catch the outfeed, and just support it at the proper height, and I’m good with it. I suppose it’s how you do your dance, but mine is almost completely at, or just in front of the cutterhead. Until that very last foot, then I will walk it through the cutterhead.

Depending on the stock, but if it is “bendy” I have used a magswitch featherboard on the far outfeed table to keep wider boards to the fence, just on edge joining. Where the leading edge goes, the remainder seems to follow, is my rationale. So I corral it up.

Most of the stationary jointers I have seen where you could more easily note what the lenghts of the individual tables were, all of them have a longer infeed anymore. Not just Martin’s

-- Think safe, be safe

View Viktor's profile

Viktor

473 posts in 4471 days


#12 posted 03-09-2021 07:54 PM

Theoretically longer infeed is more important. That is because the surface that passed the knives is flatter or at least has bumps knocked off, hence needing shorter table span for support. On the other hand, surface that rides on infeed is rougher and requires longer support span.

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