LumberJocks

How to make 4/4 look thicker on table top?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Winny94 posted 03-01-2021 10:31 PM 615 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Winny94's profile

Winny94

43 posts in 1501 days


03-01-2021 10:31 PM

Going to start in on a walnut dining table. Aprox 6’6” long, 35” wide. I have a barn full of 4/4 walnut planks that id like to use since cost is practically $0.

My wife wants the top thicker – she likes 6/4 or even 8/4, so what would be the best way doing the thicker border? Cutoff the end grain after the glue up, flip and glue it? That would require 45 degree miters at the corner joints. How about and 8/4 breadboard – any tips or tutorials on doing a breadboard w/ thinner materials?


12 replies so far

View Aj2's profile (online now)

Aj2

3775 posts in 2858 days


#1 posted 03-01-2021 10:44 PM

I wouldn’t use any 45 degree joints on the corners it would be too fussy to get right.
Just stack them up, you will have a choice on how the grain is oriented cut and flip is book match. Or you can cut and slip match. The slip match might look more toward a solid slab. It really depends on what you working with. If you have lots of sap wood i think it going to be hard to hide the cheat. :)
Good Luck

-- Aj

View splintergroup's profile (online now)

splintergroup

5031 posts in 2282 days


#2 posted 03-01-2021 11:19 PM

On the recent desk restore I did, I made a 3/4” wide “rim” around the tops underside. The long grain rails were just a cut ‘n’ attach job, got the best grain match this way versus the bookmatch appearance that happens with a folding technique. If your long grain is linear, the folding would probably be best.
That left the tops end grain which could be done the same way, leaving the piece short by 2x the long grain rims width. The ends should be done first since that allows you to achieve a gap-free fit when you attach the long grain rim pieces.

View therealSteveN's profile (online now)

therealSteveN

7539 posts in 1634 days


#3 posted 03-01-2021 11:36 PM

A lot of sources suggest doing the “miter fold” where you do a miter at 45, and flip it down, and glue it up using scabs attached to the underside of the table to keep it from sliding while the glue is wet, and slippery. I’ve never done that.

What I have done is the same treatment suggested for a plywood top to hide the predictable looking edge grain, but then I use a wider strip so it extends downward, thus making what looks like a thicker top. The issue really isn’t how you choose to attach the additional wood, there are numerous router bits, and TS cuts that will easily do the joinery. What the real issue is very closely matching any grain pattern, so even a child will ask what’s wrong with that table edge.

Imagine in your mind 2 totally different looking grain patterns married as a fake edge. Fugly….

Lots of ways to make the join so it looks good.

-- Think safe, be safe

View bilyo's profile (online now)

bilyo

1348 posts in 2163 days


#4 posted 03-02-2021 12:03 AM

I recently made this desk of 3/4” white oak. Top edges are a miter fold on all four edges. The miter joints are splined for strength and to help with alignment during glue-up. Doing this on the ends gives the grain a “waterfall” look. It is fussy to do, but I think it was worth it.

View SMP's profile (online now)

SMP

3835 posts in 966 days


#5 posted 03-02-2021 12:03 AM

I had a similar dilemma not long ago. I don’t personally like the look of the stacked. The In-laws even have an overpriced pottery barn table where they did this and it looks like crap to me. So when i did a similar one but wanting to use the 4/4 walnut I had, i bought planks of 6/4, cut everything to 6” , glued up the planks so the 2 6/4 pieces were on the outside and did a 6/4 breadboard.

View bilyo's profile (online now)

bilyo

1348 posts in 2163 days


#6 posted 03-02-2021 01:14 PM



I had a similar dilemma not long ago. I don’t personally like the look of the stacked. The In-laws even have an overpriced pottery barn table where they did this and it looks like crap to me. So when i did a similar one but wanting to use the 4/4 walnut I had, i bought planks of 6/4, cut everything to 6” , glued up the planks so the 2 6/4 pieces were on the outside and did a 6/4 breadboard.

- SMP


That’s a good technique. Got a pict or two?

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5978 posts in 3411 days


#7 posted 03-02-2021 01:37 PM

+1 on SMP, that is what I would do.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Winny94's profile

Winny94

43 posts in 1501 days


#8 posted 03-02-2021 08:11 PM



I had a similar dilemma not long ago. I don’t personally like the look of the stacked. The In-laws even have an overpriced pottery barn table where they did this and it looks like crap to me. So when i did a similar one but wanting to use the 4/4 walnut I had, i bought planks of 6/4, cut everything to 6” , glued up the planks so the 2 6/4 pieces were on the outside and did a 6/4 breadboard.

- SMP


What breadboard style did you do? Have any pics?

View SMP's profile (online now)

SMP

3835 posts in 966 days


#9 posted 03-02-2021 08:58 PM


What breadboard style did you do? Have any pics?

- Winny94

I can’t find any pics of the dining table I did. But here is one I did for my travel trailer. Same concept. Maybe hard to see but the middle section was scraps of 4/4, bought 6/4 for the outer pieces. Once all glued up made 1/2” tenons where only the top side of the 4/4 stock was rabbeted, and the bottom remains intact. Hopefully that makes sense?

View Aj2's profile (online now)

Aj2

3775 posts in 2858 days


#10 posted 03-02-2021 09:02 PM

I see what you did there that’s very cleaver.

-- Aj

View bilyo's profile (online now)

bilyo

1348 posts in 2163 days


#11 posted 03-02-2021 11:11 PM

That looks great. Is the center panel glued or floating?

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1501 posts in 2020 days


#12 posted 03-03-2021 01:30 AM

This is the way we do exterior tables for restaurants….

Turned out nice.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com