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Hanging plywood from french cleats

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Forum topic by LumberJackBear posted 03-01-2021 12:24 PM 344 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LumberJackBear

6 posts in 41 days


03-01-2021 12:24 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Howdy y’all!

I’m new here and I’m looking for some advice.

The wife and I are currently renting a house and the landlord stated that anything installed into the house stays with whenever we decide to move. My garage is decent I suppose. 20×20 I think, possibly bigger. But it is definitely not a work shop by any means. What I want to do is put up plywood on the walls but make it so I can remove it all and take it with me should we move out. I was considering hanging the plywood from french cleats with boards behind everything where the studs are and adding some foam board insulation since the garage is not insulated at all.

What do y’all think? Decent idea or should I use a different approach?

Hope to hear back on this. Thanks in advance for any help and guidance y’all can provide.


12 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2886 posts in 1213 days


#1 posted 03-01-2021 01:01 PM

welcome to the forum, Bear. what part of the world are you in ?
some photos of your project area would be nice to see.
how many sheets of plywood do you think you will be using ?
I think it is a pretty good idea, myself.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1964 posts in 652 days


#2 posted 03-01-2021 02:20 PM

As long as you can return the walls to a condition they were in when you rented the space it is non of his business what you put up or take down in the garage. What is the existing wall construction now?

View SMP's profile

SMP

3773 posts in 956 days


#3 posted 03-01-2021 04:13 PM



As long as you can return the walls to a condition they were in when you rented the space it is non of his business what you put up or take down in the garage. What is the existing wall construction now?

- controlfreak

+1, the landlord can’t just make up his own laws, unless you are in some other country?

View LumberJackBear's profile

LumberJackBear

6 posts in 41 days


#4 posted 03-01-2021 05:45 PM



welcome to the forum, Bear. what part of the world are you in ?
some photos of your project area would be nice to see.
how many sheets of plywood do you think you will be using ?
I think it is a pretty good idea, myself.

- John Smith

Thanks for the welcome, controlfreak. I’m in Texas. Dallas/Fort Worth area. I’ll get some pictures up of the work area after I clean it up a bit. It’s quite messy at the moment. I haven’t measured the square footage yet so I’m not sure how many sheets of plywood I will need.

View LumberJackBear's profile

LumberJackBear

6 posts in 41 days


#5 posted 03-01-2021 05:52 PM



As long as you can return the walls to a condition they were in when you rented the space it is non of his business what you put up or take down in the garage. What is the existing wall construction now?

- controlfreak

Returning the walls to their original condition should not pose a problem with the process of hanging the plywood like I want. The current wall construction is just your basic drywall setup but the walls are textured. A few hundred screw holes will go unnoticed after a patch up with filler and some fresh paint, whenever I take everything down. The walls are pretty rough already from the previous tenants. Anything I do at this point is only going to make it look better honestly.

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LumberJackBear

6 posts in 41 days


#6 posted 03-01-2021 05:57 PM


As long as you can return the walls to a condition they were in when you rented the space it is non of his business what you put up or take down in the garage. What is the existing wall construction now?

- controlfreak

+1, the landlord can’t just make up his own laws, unless you are in some other country?

- SMP

The landlord can set whatever rules they want I believe. It is their place after all. Most are fairly lienyent on what you do especially if you’re making the property look better.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2944 posts in 4493 days


#7 posted 03-01-2021 06:32 PM

I would suggest adding the insulation and cover it with sheet rock which will be cheaper than plywood. then add the cleats to hang your cabinets on. It would be a good idea to discuss it with your landlord before hand so there is no disagreement later.

As far as the landlord goes it all depends on what was in the rental agreement you signed. He can’t add or deletes things that are controlled by law but outside that is is a “contract” between you and him. If you violate the contract he could sue you in small claims court. My rental agreement for my tenant is 5 pages long. As I understand Texas rent laws are pretty minimal. California’s on the other hand require an attorney to interpret and even they they get it wrong.

It would be a good idea to discuss it with your landlord before hand so there is no disagreement later. Get the approval in writing !!! In this case he is getting a “finished” out garage with insulation. I would agree to that and possibly even help pay for the “improvement” as it is tax deductible for the landlord.

-- Les B, Oregon

View LumberJackBear's profile

LumberJackBear

6 posts in 41 days


#8 posted 03-01-2021 06:43 PM



I would suggest adding the insulation and cover it with sheet rock which will be cheaper than plywood. then add the cleats to hang your cabinets on. It would be a good idea to discuss it with your landlord before hand so there is no disagreement later. In this case he is getting a “finished” out garage with insulation. I would agree to that

As far as the landlord goes it all depends on what was in the rental agreement you signed. He can t add or deletes things that are controlled by law but outside that is is a “contract” between you and him. If you violate the contract he could sue you in small claims court. My rental agreement for my tenant is 5 pages long. As I understand Texas rent laws are pretty minimal.

It would be a good idea to discuss it with your landlord before hand so there is no disagreement later. Get the approval in writing !!! In this case he is getting a “finished” out garage with insulation. I would agree to that and possibly even help pay for the “improvement” as it is tax deductible for the landlord.

- LesB

I completely agree with you, Les. However, the idea is to make everything removable when it comes to leave. I’m not looking to finish the garage for him, I’m just wanting to make it more functional for me and not be out on time and materials. The garage will need a fresh coat of paint anyway. So by the time we leave nobody would even notice what I had put up and taken down.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2487 posts in 1639 days


#9 posted 03-01-2021 06:44 PM

Legally anything screwed, bolted, or otherwise attached to the permanent structure becomes part of that structure (and property of the owner.) This includes fans, dimmers, 220 outlets, curtain mounts, cabinets, etc.

The landlord is not making that up.

Removing and repairing can be construed as “damaging”. Not a good idea.

The cleat stays (like a closet rod) but whats hanging from it goes (like the clothes in the closet).

Better to build free standing units that can be lugged out without damaging the walls or even leaving screw holes.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View LumberJackBear's profile

LumberJackBear

6 posts in 41 days


#10 posted 03-01-2021 06:55 PM



Legally anything screwed, bolted, or otherwise attached to the permanent structure becomes part of that structure. This includes fans, dimmers, 220 outlets, curtain mounts, cabinets, etc.

The cleat stays (like a closet rod) but whats hanging from it goes (like the clothes in the closet).

Better to build free standing units that can be lugged out without damaging the walls or even leaving screw holes.

- Madmark2

I have no problem with leaving the cleats behind. I plan on making them nice so that when we go they’ll be somewhat aesthetically pleasing to the eye and the next tenant (should they know what they are) will be able to use them as well.

I had already thought about making some free standing walls but my garage floor sits at a slight slant and I feel like this would just cause more of headache and definitely more in material cost.

View AlanWS's profile

AlanWS

133 posts in 4609 days


#11 posted 03-01-2021 06:59 PM

Cleats on the wall to hang what you want sounds reasonable to me. You could even mount the insulation on the back of the plywood, rather than the wall, unless the landlord pays for it.

-- Alan in Wisconsin

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1964 posts in 652 days


#12 posted 03-01-2021 07:07 PM

Take “before” pictures of each wall. When you remove what’s there for repurposing later on use some patching for the holes and add a coat of paint. If the after pictures look as good as the before you’re good. I will also warn you that you are creating a lot of work for yourself on move out week.

Clear wall
Take down plywood
Haul plywood to location or storage
Patch wall
Paint wall

All of this extra when moving alone can damn near kill ya

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