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Trunnion Bolts Very, Very Tight

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Forum topic by Burgoo posted 03-01-2021 02:37 AM 278 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Burgoo

16 posts in 1320 days


03-01-2021 02:37 AM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw tool refurbish restore motor trunnion rust saw craftsman question

I’m giving my 152 series Craftsman saw (early 2000’s?) a deep clean before I put on a new Vega fence system. It’s been in fine working order for the most part for the ~8 years that I’ve had it, but it has some light rust on the inner bits.

I’m trying to refurbish all of the inner motor mount parts to as close to like-new as I can using various rust neutralizers and rust dissolvers (dissolvers for spots needing bare metal, neutralizer for spots that will be repainted black).

I wanted to take apart the trunnion because it would be a lot easier to get all of the rust. But there are nylon lock nuts on the ends of the trunnion rods (I’m sure that’s not the name). They are huge 15/16” nuts, and firm but even pressure with my 3/8” drive breaker bar didn’t make a budge, neither did the breaker bar with a 2’6” pipe added. I was concerned I would break the driver on the breaker bar so I went an got a 1/2” drive socket and 24” long 1/2” drive breaker bar. This also did not make a budge, and since I had the piece clamped down to my bench by a couple of small parts of the trunnion, I was also now worried about breaking these off of the trunnion itself. I don’t know the actual force value I was applying—I wasn’t jumping on it or hitting it with a hammer—but I was leaning on it pretty good, and a 3 foot torque-arm will put a LOT of force on that nut for not a lot of input.

It’s not the end of the world if I can’t take this apart, it’ll just be a lot more cumbersome to get it clean. But I wanted to know, should I keep at it and the lock nuts will give way, or was I right to stop before I broke something off of a part that can’t be replaced? I don’t have an oxy-acetylene torch, but I have a little soldering torch…could that be used to heat it up to try to loosen it, or will heating up a nut with a nylon bushing just melt the nylon?


4 replies so far

View AlanWS's profile

AlanWS

134 posts in 4613 days


#1 posted 03-01-2021 04:35 AM

When I got my first (used) table saw I took it apart as much as I could, but I couldn’t get apart those trunnion rods. I put it all together after cleaning and some repair, and it has worked well for decades.

One of the trickiest adjustments to make on a contractor saw is to fix the problem of alignment of the blade with the miter slot changing when you tilt the blade. The problem is caused by getting those rods twisted compared to one another. I was very lucky to not be able to loosen them, since I wouldn’t have known then how to get them properly adjusted.

So my advice is to leave them attached. If you have loosened them, use a piece of glass flat touching both rods to make sure they are parallel when you tighten.

-- Alan in Wisconsin

View Burgoo's profile

Burgoo

16 posts in 1320 days


#2 posted 03-01-2021 06:11 AM

That is excellent advice, thank you! It didn’t occur to me that those rods are involved with blade alignment, and if I had gotten them off I probably would have never figured out why everything was messed up when I put it all back together.

It’s proven to be more trouble than the possible benefit to take them off, especially since everything worked well to begin with—just a really bad squeak when lowering the blade (which, after dismantling most of the trunnion, I found that the pivot for the lowering arm had ZERO lubricant on it…and that looked like it hadn’t seen daylight since it left the factory!). I’m going to leave it together and the rust remover should still work ok.


When I got my first (used) table saw I took it apart as much as I could, but I couldn t get apart those trunnion rods. I put it all together after cleaning and some repair, and it has worked well for decades.

One of the trickiest adjustments to make on a contractor saw is to fix the problem of alignment of the blade with the miter slot changing when you tilt the blade. The problem is caused by getting those rods twisted compared to one another. I was very lucky to not be able to loosen them, since I wouldn t have known then how to get them properly adjusted.

So my advice is to leave them attached. If you have loosened them, use a piece of glass flat touching both rods to make sure they are parallel when you tighten.

- AlanWS


View david2011's profile

david2011

137 posts in 4762 days


#3 posted 03-01-2021 07:21 AM

Sounds like the wisdom of the day is to leave them alone. When you do need to remove fasteners that have been in place for a long time, I highly recommend Kroil or Aero-Kroil from Cano Labs. It’s what Liquid Wrench and Knock ‘er Loose want to be. For really stubborn or corroded parts let it soak for 24-72 hours.

I’ve used it to help get the barrels out of the receivers of 100+ year old Mausers that were used with corrosive ammunition.

-- David

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1764 posts in 2704 days


#4 posted 03-01-2021 12:12 PM

FWIW, seen many objective tests of fluids to break nuts loose. None of them work when objectively tested. A pneumatic impact wrench is what will break them lose. Nyloc-nuts are one-time use, so IF you took it apart, bet new nuts.

But, I would just wire brush it together following the above advice on alignment.

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