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Forum topic by Austin6 posted 03-01-2021 01:06 AM 441 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Austin6

38 posts in 233 days


03-01-2021 01:06 AM

Hello, I have recently purchased a home with a 24×40 pole barn on the property and a 2 car attached garage on the house. Why is the attached garage part important? Because that means that 100% of the pole barn can be used for my dream wood working shop! I think in my wildest dreams I wouldn’t dream of having something half that size for a wood working space but I am thrilled and blessed with the opportunity I have with a space this big.

I want to reach out on this forum in hopes that I can get some good recommendations on shop lighting. The ceilings of the barn are 16 feet high so I am assuming I’ll need a pretty powerful light. Any recommendations on light type, the number of lights I need, and any other recommendations for planning on my new shop are very appreciated! I don’t have a massive budget, but I am capable of doing the wiring myself. I just want something powerful, affordable, and long lasting.

Thanks.


12 replies so far

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

12314 posts in 4479 days


#1 posted 03-01-2021 01:48 AM

I would recommend https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0874PKNRD/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o07_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1 I use them in my 20X40 metal building with 10’ ceilings. More than ample.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Jake229's profile

Jake229

62 posts in 453 days


#2 posted 03-01-2021 04:11 AM

Hello!
I opted for prime lights. https://www.primelights.com. They provided a lighting layout and super fast shipping. I ended up using their bolt 3 for my shop. I ended up with 6 lights for my 24×32x10’ shop with very little shadows. Also, I have no financial interest in the company. Just nice lights, not the cheapest, but decent quality. Best of luck with your project!

-- Be safe out there

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

8740 posts in 3459 days


#3 posted 03-01-2021 06:29 AM

Whatever lights you do decide on here is a helpful tip. Put outlets in your ceiling and PLUG them into the outlet. Now if a light fails you need not turn the power off and have to rewire a light, just unplug and take down.

Like this.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View PNWBachelor's profile

PNWBachelor

11 posts in 46 days


#4 posted 03-01-2021 06:56 AM

I am in the midst of doing some shop improvements in my 2-car garage space, and considering 6” recessed LED lights, like these:
https://www.amazon.com/Amico-Ultra-Thin-2700K-5000K-Selectable-Can-Killer/dp/B087JL1W9M/ref=sr_1_5?crid=2WW5U1S43WYOJ&dchild=1&keywords=6+led+recessed+light&qid=1614581060&sprefix=6%22+led+%2Caps%2C278&sr=8-5

I installed half a dozen of the 4” soft white, brushed bronze variant in a recent entry way project and was shocked by how bright they are—I need to install a dimmer. I imagine the bright white ones would be like daylight. They were super easy to wire and the trim/light/can are all one piece that plugs into the j-box and snaps right into the hole. They are only about 1” thick and permitted for insulation contact.

I’d love to get rid of all the dangly florescent fixtures hanging from my 9’ ceilings; of course this isn’t an issue for your 16’ ceilings—however changing light bulbs could be?? I’m optimistic that these LEDs last for a very long time before I have to think about them again.

-- Dan from Seattle, WA

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david2011

137 posts in 4758 days


#5 posted 03-01-2021 07:02 AM

I used Barrina 8’ LED fixtures. As of this post they’re about $210 for 10 of them from Amazon. I have 8 in a 19’x20’ room and they’re extremely bright; far brighter than classroom lighting. The other two are in a loft. I did as Woodbutcherby night did and mounted outlets in the ceiling. I also have the lights isolated on two switches so I don’t have to turn all of them on if I don’t want to. Mine are mounted in four rows of two and the fixtures are plugged together end to end. They’re very lightweight and only draw 0.6 amps each. I have to wear reading glasses but they produce enough light with my 8’ ceiling to read the 1/64” divisions on a scale. They come with the hardware to either plug them together end-to-end or with cords so they can be separated a few feet.

If you suspend them 10’-12’ above the floor then 20 lights would light up the shop very well.

Technical explanation- I spent much of my working career as a photographer: Light falls of by a factor of 4 if you double the distance or it increases by a factor of 4 if the distance is cut in half. If your work surfaces are 3’ above the floor that’s 13 feet to the ceiling. Hanging the lights at 10 feet above the floor; 7’ above the work surfaces would result in nearly 4 times as much light on the work surfaces compared to mounting them on the ceiling for the cost of some lightweight chain.

https://www.amazon.com/Barrina-8500LM-Daylight-Output-Linkable/dp/B07RKZFD5Z/ref=sr_1_3?crid=WNZ8FYFUJ543&dchild=1&keywords=barrina+led+shop+light&qid=1614580546&sprefix=barrina%2Caps%2C285&sr=8-3

-- David

View Austin6's profile

Austin6

38 posts in 233 days


#6 posted 03-01-2021 01:08 PM



I used Barrina 8 LED fixtures. As of this post they re about $210 for 10 of them from Amazon. I have 8 in a 19×20 room and they re extremely bright; far brighter than classroom lighting. The other two are in a loft. I did as Woodbutcherby night did and mounted outlets in the ceiling. I also have the lights isolated on two switches so I don t have to turn all of them on if I don t want to. Mine are mounted in four rows of two and the fixtures are plugged together end to end. They re very lightweight and only draw 0.6 amps each. I have to wear reading glasses but they produce enough light with my 8 ceiling to read the 1/64” divisions on a scale. They come with the hardware to either plug them together end-to-end or with cords so they can be separated a few feet.

If you suspend them 10 -12 above the floor then 20 lights would light up the shop very well.

Technical explanation- I spent much of my working career as a photographer: Light falls of by a factor of 4 if you double the distance or it increases by a factor of 4 if the distance is cut in half. If your work surfaces are 3 above the floor that s 13 feet to the ceiling. Hanging the lights at 10 feet above the floor; 7 above the work surfaces would result in nearly 4 times as much light on the work surfaces compared to mounting them on the ceiling for the cost of some lightweight chain.

https://www.amazon.com/Barrina-8500LM-Daylight-Output-Linkable/dp/B07RKZFD5Z/ref=sr_1_3?crid=WNZ8FYFUJ543&dchild=1&keywords=barrina+led+shop+light&qid=1614580546&sprefix=barrina%2Caps%2C285&sr=8-3

- david2011


Super helpful knowledge. Thanks a bunch for your advice!

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2347 posts in 3844 days


#7 posted 03-01-2021 01:27 PM

For a less expensive, easy to install and maintain system, porcelain sockets without the on off switch are cheap to buy and easy to install on a box with a round plaster ring. The screw in lamps some call cob lights because they look like an ear of corn come in many sizes. Just be sure to buy the ones that have leds in the bottom as well as the sides. Strip lights and shop light style fixtures are nice but cost more. Be sure to check on rebates from your power company for led lighting. I go with 5000k light color. The old rule on the job was if you double the height of a fixture, you get 1/4 the light. I don’t think getting a building that size for a shop is in my future. Enjoy!!

View Kudzupatch's profile

Kudzupatch

168 posts in 2259 days


#8 posted 03-01-2021 02:03 PM


For a less expensive, easy to install and maintain system, porcelain sockets without the on off switch are cheap to buy and easy to install on a box…...

Going to be be building a new shop soon. Been thinking on this a lot and I think I am going this way. Porcelain bases and LED lamps. Cheap to install and easy to swap out the lights.Not tied into someone proprietary system, so this gives you to option to swap out bulbs and try something else if your not happy.

I have been seriously looking at this style bulbs. Watched a couple of videos with them and seem to have a very high output. Of course that will vary with the brand. I am still researching this but really like what I am reading.

-- Jeff Horton * Kudzu Craft skin boats* www.kudzucraft.com

View Robert's profile

Robert

4519 posts in 2531 days


#9 posted 03-01-2021 02:32 PM

I’ve also converted a horse barn into a shop. Concrete was a big expense. I framed the walls between the poles and used metal roofing run sideways for the exterior. I highly recommend you dig around the posts and check for ground rot before you do anything.

LED lights for sure. No way I’d use anything other than tubes. I’ve replaced almost all of mine and although expensive, worth every penny.

8’ LED bulbs are not cheap so I would go with 4’ T8 LED fixtures. Amazon might be OK for bulbs, but I would buy the fixtures from a local electric supply. I paid about $12 for bare fixtures. 16’ is pretty high, if desired you can suspend them. The Barina item david2011 mentioned are just the bulbs, not fixtures.

IMO putting an outlet and wiring every light with a plug just to avoid turning out the lights to change a bulb is not worth the time and effort. If you have a large shop, you should have 2-3 banks of bulbs on separate circuits. Just daisy chain the fixtures save a lot of extra work, time and $’s.

Other suggestions>

Big expense, but if you can, get a separate service, so when your second dream comes true, you can air condition your shop :-). Plus you’ll have a nice panel with plenty of room for circuits.

Consider running a 3 wire to the outlets, & splitting them so each one is on a separate circuit. This can come in handy when running a shop vac and miter saw, for example.

Don’t try to prewire outlets for your machines. Run them as surface mount conduit so you have some flexibility in moving them around.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1747 posts in 2700 days


#10 posted 03-01-2021 02:33 PM

My main built in lights were from some random source on-line. Prices for the same things can range by 10 times, so search carefully.
For over benches, I bought a pile of LED lights from Harbor Freight.
I still need a spot on my drill press and band saw.

While empty, hose it all down in white paint!
You need twice as much alight as you think.
It does not have to be on the ceiling. Just high enough to be out of the way. Over benches and the like just above your head.

You could of course just put in the ceramic screw base and use the daisy flower lights.

I do have 2 zones in my 24×32. Half over my woodshop, half over my Triumph I am restoring.

Look at the specifications for color and lumens for power consumed. They do vary by quite a bit. All LEDS are not the same. Good thing about LEDs is they don’t have the huge inrush fluorescents had so you don’t have to split their starting.

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

454 posts in 647 days


#11 posted 03-01-2021 03:53 PM

I picked up these last year (currently unavailable, of course) – LED lights

I have them in my shop which has 10’ ceilings. They work quite well for a nice general lighting solution. I have them over my bench and tablesaw/router table. I used one pair inside a cabinet I built.

I’ll be buying something similar here soon to add some more lighting to the shop (I have recently reconfigured my shop and taken over a little more space).

I like the suggestion of outlets and plugging in the light units. I daisy chained all the ones in my shop, then plugged them into an Amazon Alexa plug thing. now, I walk in and tell Alexa to ‘Open Shop’ and it turns on the lights and starts playing my Pandora. At the end of the day, I tell Alexa to ‘Close Shop’ and everything goes dark and silent. Very convenient! The nice thing is, I know the LEDs don’t draw too much juice for the Alexa plug.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

View Jim2020's profile

Jim2020

56 posts in 289 days


#12 posted 03-05-2021 09:37 PM

Take a look at Stumpy Nubs’ video on his new shop. He has a piece about the lights he’s installing. I’ve never seen this type fixture before, and they look really nice. I have no idea about the cost. If I were doing my shop now I’d seriously consider those lights. For me, I have tracks running around my 3 car garage shop with LED spots in various track fixtures I’ve bought over the last 20 years. Works pretty well, and is quite flexible Jim

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