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How to crosscut thick silver maple cookie slab

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Forum topic by coalcracker posted 02-28-2021 11:03 PM 373 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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coalcracker

38 posts in 779 days


02-28-2021 11:03 PM

I have a large silver maple cookie that varies from ~4-6 inches in thickness that I’d like to make into a rectangular end table. Final thickness is not important, anything from 2-4 inches would be fine with me. I’m considering two approaches:

1. Flatten the slab with a router jig, after which it will be near 4” in thickness. Then crosscut the sides with a table saw (flipping over the slab to get full thickness) and cleaning up the edges.

2. Flatten with a router jig and continue to remove thickness until I can make a single edge cut with a table saw (~3 inches thickness).

Any thoughts on which of these will work better? Any other options?


10 replies so far

View Sycamoray's profile

Sycamoray

71 posts in 291 days


#1 posted 03-09-2021 11:19 PM

Of your two proposed options, I’d favor thinning the cookie down to make a single cut. Provided, of course, that your TS can handle that much maple.

Other options:

#5 jack plane and a sharp handsaw.
hand-held power plane and a chainsaw.

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coalcracker

38 posts in 779 days


#2 posted 03-10-2021 12:09 AM

Excuse the dumb question, but how do I know if my table saw can handle it (I have a Dewalt DWE749 1rs).

Any thoughts on blade choice?

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

977 posts in 2512 days


#3 posted 03-10-2021 12:40 AM

Option 1 for sure. Unless you prefer it to be a thinner table top. But don’t try to make one pass and flip. 4” thick, three 1” passes, flip and finish.
That saw will handle that fine.
Bigger question is how are you planning on cutting a round cookie on a table saw?
Does you cookie have a straight edge? Or are you making a sled for that?

-- John

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jkm312

86 posts in 454 days


#4 posted 03-10-2021 12:44 AM

I don’t think you have enough saw for what you are trying to do. Even at 1/2 the thickness of the maple per cut, a reasonable chance the saw may bind/stall and kick back at you.
How well does the saw handle ripping 2 X material? You are talking about twice that much.
If you use a thin kerf blade, that will save a little power, but the blade may deflect in the cut if it releases some hidden stress in the material.

A better solution is to cut it on a 3 HP/220 volt cabinet saw if you have access to one with a sharp blade.

Another idea is with a router, straight bit 1/2 inch shank and straight edges. Make shallow cuts increasing the depth at each pass until you cut thru. It will be a slow process.

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coalcracker

38 posts in 779 days


#5 posted 03-10-2021 01:00 AM



Option 1 for sure. Unless you prefer it to be a thinner table top. But don t try to make one pass and flip. 4” thick, three 1” passes, flip and finish.
That saw will handle that fine.
Bigger question is how are you planning on cutting a round cookie on a table saw?
Does you cookie have a straight edge? Or are you making a sled for that?

- bigJohninvegas

Long story long: I have 2 nice cookies and am saving one for a live-edge coffee table :). The one I’m describing here I’ve already cut into a roughly rectangular shape with a sawzall and 9 inch blade (that was fun). I used the live edges to make 4 pairs of bookends as Christmas gifts.

Once I flatten it, I plan to build a sled to get one straight and then cut the other 3 sides off of that.

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coalcracker

38 posts in 779 days


#6 posted 03-10-2021 01:05 AM



I don t think you have enough saw for what you are trying to do. Even at 1/2 the thickness of the maple per cut, a reasonable chance the saw may bind/stall and kick back at you.
How well does the saw handle ripping 2 X material? You are talking about twice that much.
If you use a thin kerf blade, that will save a little power, but the blade may deflect in the cut if it releases some hidden stress in the material.

A better solution is to cut it on a 3 HP/220 volt cabinet saw if you have access to one with a sharp blade.

Another idea is with a router, straight bit 1/2 inch shank and straight edges. Make shallow cuts increasing the depth at each pass until you cut thru. It will be a slow process.

- jkm312

I’m trying to do this safely, first and foremost. If I get it down to, say, 4” thickness I would make progressively deeper cuts, maybe 1/2” at a time, until I’m full depth on one side, then flip it over. Do you think this would work?

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Foghorn

1143 posts in 437 days


#7 posted 03-10-2021 06:36 AM

Do you have a bandsaw?

-- Darrel

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1457 posts in 4133 days


#8 posted 03-10-2021 10:20 AM

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

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tvrgeek

1747 posts in 2700 days


#9 posted 03-10-2021 10:44 AM

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jkm312

86 posts in 454 days


#10 posted 03-11-2021 01:01 AM

Are you making a square top, or round. The term “cookie” is confusing.
A picture or 2 will help a lot in getting more accurate answers to your question.

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