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Forum topic by Cnes posted 02-28-2021 06:22 PM 447 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cnes

8 posts in 973 days


02-28-2021 06:22 PM

Just purchased my first lathe. A jet midi. I am looking for any recommendations on a sharpening system. Any tips appreciated.


10 replies so far

View Andre's profile

Andre

4459 posts in 2861 days


#1 posted 02-28-2021 08:39 PM

6” or 8” grinder, with wolverine system. I hear belt grinders work well also?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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bigJohninvegas

978 posts in 2517 days


#2 posted 02-28-2021 09:55 PM

+1 on the Wolverine system. 8” grinder is preferred.
I tend to see that most turners seem to use this. However there are also groups that like belt sanders. and more even that make home made jigs for a belt, and also copy the wolverine.
Tormek also makes lathe jigs. And sometimes I wish I had gone with that system. Tormek has jigs to sharpen just about evreything. while my wolverine is a great setup. It has but one use for me.

-- John

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8514 posts in 3254 days


#3 posted 02-28-2021 11:48 PM

Put me in the belt sander category… had it already, it works well, and with a cheap homemade jig or two can do basically anything the high priced options can. Only grinding I do on my grinder is very rough shaping and sharpening of things like lawn mower blades.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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mike02719

300 posts in 4841 days


#4 posted 03-01-2021 05:40 PM

I too prefer the Wolverine system. I now use the white stone, but it is getting smaller and will replace it with CBN. Also for skews, scrapers, and other tools that are basically flat, I use a 1 inch belt sander stationed right next to my lathe. This sander is also used for knives chisels and other sharpening tasks.

-- Mike, Massachusetts

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Cnes

8 posts in 973 days


#5 posted 03-01-2021 06:33 PM

Thanks for all the tips. I do have a 8” slow speed grinder that the wolverine setup can work with. So I think I will go this route. I do have a veritas jig setup in front of one wheel already. I assume I can put the jig in front of the other wheel.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1288 posts in 966 days


#6 posted 03-01-2021 10:26 PM

You can find lesser expensive sharpening options that work well. After watching this video from Thompson Lathe Tools. I got the Wolverine System, I already had 6” and 8” bench grinders. I use this with my 8” bench grinder.https://thompsonlathetools.com/sharpening/

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

16197 posts in 2040 days


#7 posted 03-02-2021 12:23 AM



+1 on the Wolverine system. 8” grinder is preferred.
I tend to see that most turners seem to use this. However there are also groups that like belt sanders. and more even that make home made jigs for a belt, and also copy the wolverine.
Tormek also makes lathe jigs. And sometimes I wish I had gone with that system. Tormek has jigs to sharpen just about evreything. while my wolverine is a great setup. It has but one use for me.

- bigJohninvegas


+1 the tormek is a great system and can sharpen just about anything youve got,it is expensive though but worth the cost if you can afford it.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5952 posts in 4718 days


#8 posted 03-02-2021 12:50 AM

I’m just the opposite … I have, and prefer, the OneWay Wolverine.

I am a college woodturning instructor, and we have both Wolverine and Tormek systems in our turning studio. Try as I may, I do not have the patience to use the Tormek. The Wolverine is much faster and, IMHO, has a much shorter learning curve.

The Tormek is great for putting a fine edge on carving tools, etc., but way too slow for turning tools.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3495 posts in 3999 days


#9 posted 03-03-2021 02:08 AM

I have the 1” belt sander, and the wheels. I have the CBN’s and the little white puppies. Based on my first hand knowledge and experience, I’d say:

- get the slowest or most variable speed grinder you can, so you can control (limit) the heat the process builds up, AND avoid taking off pounds of metal, with each sharpening.

- use jigs, whether home made or commercial.

- bigger is better with wheels (notice all the cars did not drop to 13” wheels?). Go with 8”, rather than 6”.

- I love my belt for quick touch ups.

- I love my grinder in conjunction with jigs (the Oneway Wolf critters for my grinder).

- after using the belt for a while, I am always amazed at the improved cut when I go back to the jigs.

- the CBN wheels hurt, at purchase, but the powder left behind, using them, is metal and not the wheel, seemingly forever.

- in a pinch, you only need one CBN, for me it would be the 180.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2774 posts in 3045 days


#10 posted 03-04-2021 02:16 PM

The “standard” in the turning world is 8” slow speed grinder, Al oxide or cbn wheels, wolverine with varigrind jigs. There are other brand jigs and shop made – see Capn Eddie. Advantage of wolverine/varigrind is the amount of support from everywhere for how to get specific grinds. Al oxide wheels work just fine, get cbn later if you turn a lot. Belt sanders work fine but require a lot of user setup unless an expensive “system” is used, and a lot less “help” available for the newbie.

I use an 8” low speed grinder and a Grizzly tormek copy with tormek jigs – had the griz before starting turning. It is excellent for resharpening gouges, useless for shaping. Mush less material removal for each resharpening – actually excellent for students since mistakes are less harmful – use secondary bevels for clearance and reduce material the wet grinder removes. I use the bench grinder for non-gouges and shaping gouges.

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