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Forum topic by woodman71 posted 02-24-2021 11:29 PM 595 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodman71

194 posts in 4374 days


02-24-2021 11:29 PM

I pretty sure this was ask before but can’t remember the answer. What lubricant do you use on the screw jack that raise the blade up and down . I know that if you use Grease you can cause wood dust and fine chips to get caught in the screw jack causing wear. So any help wood be great thanks


26 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8502 posts in 3249 days


#1 posted 02-24-2021 11:35 PM

Available in the canning section of your local grocery store

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Rich

6768 posts in 1640 days


#2 posted 02-24-2021 11:49 PM

There are silicone spray lubricants out there that won’t attract dust. They spray on wet, but once the solution evaporates, you’re left with dry lubricant.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Kudzupatch

168 posts in 2259 days


#3 posted 02-24-2021 11:56 PM



Available in the canning section of your local grocery store

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

LOL Beat me to it.

-- Jeff Horton * Kudzu Craft skin boats* www.kudzucraft.com

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SMP

3772 posts in 956 days


#4 posted 02-25-2021 12:36 AM



There are silicone spray lubricants out there that won t attract dust. They spray on wet, but once the solution evaporates, you re left with dry lubricant.

- Rich

Yep, commonly used for treadmills and gym equipment as well as for bicycle chains. Often referred to as “dry silicone” spray. Last thing you want on a mountain bike is a chain that collects dirt, so I have quite a few from my local bike store.

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pottz

16107 posts in 2035 days


#5 posted 02-25-2021 12:48 AM

as said any lubricant that is “dry” will work.i use dry silicones myself.if it’s not dry you will make it worse.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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Richard Lee

390 posts in 1825 days


#6 posted 02-25-2021 01:13 AM

https://www.sawstop.ca/support/service-tips/industrial-cabinet-saw

If you watch the video on lubrication, they recommend grease, ive been using regular grease on my 30 year old General 350
Still works. fine.

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1747 posts in 2700 days


#7 posted 02-25-2021 01:51 AM

Boing T-9 sometimes, though most dry lubricants are not good with high pressure. My last saw was greased and had no problem over many years. My new one came greased. I have this sticky high pressure grease I use on Triumph half shafts that is my go-to. Very high metal content, moly, zinc, and aluminum I think.

Wood dust does not cause wear on iron. Wear comes from picking up dirt in the grease. It can get gummy, so brushing on a new slop every year or so keeps things in good nick.

What ever you pick, never use WD-40. It is not a lubricant and turns to gum. Silicone I don’t let get neat my shop as the slightest abound can ruin a finish causing fish-eyes.

Plain old candle wax is probably just fine too. I use it on the tables.

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tvrgeek

1747 posts in 2700 days


#8 posted 02-25-2021 01:57 AM

Boing T-9 sometimes, though most dry lubricants are not good with high pressure. My last saw was greased and had no problem over many years. My new one came greased. I have some sticky high pressure grease I use on Triumph half shafts that is my go-to.

Wood dust does not cause wear on iron. Wear comes from picking up dirt in the grease. It can get gummy, so brushing on a new slop every year or so keeps things in good nick.

View SMP's profile (online now)

SMP

3772 posts in 956 days


#9 posted 02-25-2021 02:21 AM


Wood dust does not cause wear on iron. Wear comes from picking up dirt in the grease. It can get gummy, so brushing on a new slop every year or so keeps things in good nick.

- tvrgeek

Its not wear thats the issue. Its the wood and grease “glop” that gets thick enough to impede the movement of the screw. Have seens it many times affect the blade height/cut depth as well as saws not being able to bevel to 45 etc. Happened to my Delta that came factory greased and I see posts here probably once a month “why won’t my saw blade go to 45?”

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

1143 posts in 437 days


#10 posted 02-25-2021 02:34 AM



There are silicone spray lubricants out there that won t attract dust. They spray on wet, but once the solution evaporates, you re left with dry lubricant.

- Rich


I avoid anything that says silicone in my shop. Silicone and lacquer should be miles apart.

-- Darrel

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Rich

6768 posts in 1640 days


#11 posted 02-25-2021 02:49 AM

There are silicone spray lubricants out there that won t attract dust. They spray on wet, but once the solution evaporates, you re left with dry lubricant.

- Rich

I avoid anything that says silicone in my shop. Silicone and lacquer should be miles apart.

- Foghorn

Very dramatic. I think you are misinformed however. I’ve never had a problem with silicone dry lube in my shop where I spray lacquer. If you have, you’re doing something wrong.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Foghorn

1143 posts in 437 days


#12 posted 02-25-2021 03:23 AM


There are silicone spray lubricants out there that won t attract dust. They spray on wet, but once the solution evaporates, you re left with dry lubricant.

- Rich

I avoid anything that says silicone in my shop. Silicone and lacquer should be miles apart.

- Foghorn

Very dramatic. I think you are misinformed however. I’ve never had a problem with silicone dry lube in my shop where I spray lacquer. If you have, you’re doing something wrong.

- Rich


Just my paranoid assumptions based on years of guitar finishers telling me to be paranoid. :)

-- Darrel

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Rich

6768 posts in 1640 days


#13 posted 02-25-2021 03:58 AM


Just my paranoid assumptions based on years of guitar finishers telling me to be paranoid. :)

- Foghorn

Your guitars are beautiful. I admire your talent.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Foghorn

1143 posts in 437 days


#14 posted 02-25-2021 04:07 PM


Just my paranoid assumptions based on years of guitar finishers telling me to be paranoid. :)

- Foghorn

Your guitars are beautiful. I admire your talent.

- Rich


Thanks Rich. I appreciate the comment.

-- Darrel

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splintergroup

4963 posts in 2273 days


#15 posted 02-25-2021 04:22 PM

I used to use dry lubes on my Unisaw, but they never seemed to last long before that awful squealing returned when cranking the blade height.

Lately I’ve just been using up my near-empties of wheel bearing grease. Stays in place, doesn’t seem any more attractive to the sawdust as other things I’ve used. A rag gets any globs that collect before I reapply.

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