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Suggestions Wanted For My First End Grain Cutting Board

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Forum topic by 18wheelznwood posted 02-22-2021 09:00 PM 700 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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18wheelznwood

133 posts in 87 days


02-22-2021 09:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: cutting boards end grain question tip trick cherry maple purpleheart walnut clamp jointer miter saw planer router tablesaw finishing joining milling sanding

I just finished making 2 edge grain cutting boards and now the wife is hooked. She wants an end grain board. We went hardwood shopping Saturday and ended up bringing home about 23 board feet of 8/4 maple, cherry, walnut and Purple Heart. She fell in love with the Purple Heart when she walked in the door. So I will have plenty of material to make several different styles. I am looking to get some suggestions and possibly a few tip from all you artisans out there. I’m pretty sure that I have most all the tools to do this, except for a drum sander. I plan on trying to keep them under 12” in width just to make milling a little easier. All advice and suggestions are gladly accepted.

Mark


14 replies so far

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splintergroup

5000 posts in 2280 days


#1 posted 02-22-2021 11:13 PM

The simplest approach is just to make an end grain like you did before, several inches longer. Cross cut that into strips as wide as you want the board thick (+ any guestimate of flattening/glueup losses) and rearrange the strips for pattern.

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Walker

464 posts in 1530 days


#2 posted 02-22-2021 11:18 PM

you might be tempted to mix edge grain and end grain to get the colors/sizes you want, but do not do that! more likely to have stress from movement and pull itself apart. Purple heart is nifty for a little while, but make sure your wire understands it’s going to turn brown at some point.

-- ~Walker

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18wheelznwood

133 posts in 87 days


#3 posted 02-22-2021 11:51 PM

Thanks guys, I definitely will let her know that the purple heart will darken over time. One of the things I’ve been learning is how much wood moves and in which directions. Never thought much about it really, but it makes perfect sense really, all building material has to deal with expansion and contraction.

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splintergroup

5000 posts in 2280 days


#4 posted 02-22-2021 11:57 PM

I went overboard experimenting with that 8^)

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18wheelznwood

133 posts in 87 days


#5 posted 02-23-2021 12:12 AM

Thanks Splintergroup, I agree with you that end grain boards that are bound for commercial kitchens definitely should not be of mixed species. Yes, definitely stress moisture management to the end user.

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LesB

2956 posts in 4501 days


#6 posted 02-23-2021 01:02 AM

Walker beat me to the fact that Purple heart will turn brown. You can keep the purple color a lot longer if you seal it with a hard top finish like a lacquer or water based varathane and keep it out of any direct sun light. Of course with a hard top finish you won’t want to use sharp knives on it. Don’t apply any oil before using a hard top finish as oil will darken some wood immediately. If you want to seal the wood before applying the hard finish use a de-waxed clear shellac like Zinnsser’s seal coat.

If you wife likes bright colors try some Blood wood. It holds it color longer but the color can actually bleed to any light colored wood near by when the finish is applied. Same type darkening happens to it.

Other finishes I usually recommend for kitchen utensils and cutting boards is processed Walnut oil. It pops the grain pattern, unlike mineral oil it cures completely dry form in 24 – 28 hours, is non toxic and non allergenic, and can be reapplied as needed. Mahoney’s or Doctor’s work and they also come in a form mixed with wax which may be more moisture resistance or you can apply a wax after they cure.

-- Les B, Oregon

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18wheelznwood

133 posts in 87 days


#7 posted 02-23-2021 01:08 AM

Thanks Les. It’s still a beautiful wood regardless if it browns with age.

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Aj2

3773 posts in 2856 days


#8 posted 02-23-2021 02:11 AM

My advice is never lay your boards on the ground. They will pick up sand,dirt and even small metal pieces that will dull blades. Or nick jointer knives even carbide
Good Luck

-- Aj

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18wheelznwood

133 posts in 87 days


#9 posted 02-23-2021 02:19 AM

Thanks AJ, it’s an issue that I have to address for sure.

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Steve

2482 posts in 1640 days


#10 posted 02-23-2021 04:19 PM



My advice is never lay your boards on the ground. They will pick up sand,dirt and even small metal pieces that will dull blades. Or nick jointer knives even carbide
Good Luck

- Aj2

I was going to add that the boards should be stickered while determining the pattern you want to go with

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18wheelznwood

133 posts in 87 days


#11 posted 03-05-2021 11:28 PM

Now have decided what the plan is for the cutting board. It’s going to be made from cherry, Purple Heart and maple. I’m proud of my little Craftsman contractor saw, ripped the 8/4 cherry, maple and Purple Heart like a pro! No burns or scorching and only one little saw mark in the maple when I didn’t have my push stick ready and had to pause for a second in the middle of the cut.

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18wheelznwood

133 posts in 87 days


#12 posted 03-10-2021 07:44 PM

More progress.

I’m happy with the progress. Need to wait for it to warm up a little bit before final glue up.

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them700project

300 posts in 2076 days


#13 posted 03-10-2021 08:25 PM

You can plane/joint end grain if you glue something sacrificial to the trailing edge. I use scrap pine i have. Granted I shield myself from the back of the planer as i have had small pieces kick. Once its flat chop it off on the TS.

Keep end grain at 1-1/2’ thick or greater to prevent cracking

Walnut/maple/padauk have all worked very well for me. I especially like end grain padauk

I like a couple dips in mineral oil followed by mineral oil/ beeswax.

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splintergroup

5000 posts in 2280 days


#14 posted 03-10-2021 10:34 PM

Looking good Wheelz!

I’m always shocked by how much wood these take, of course it has nothing to do with dozens of 1/8” saw kerfs turning wood into sawdust…..

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