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Forum topic by tntobel posted 02-11-2021 04:43 AM 569 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tntobel

35 posts in 393 days


02-11-2021 04:43 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hello all,

Does anyone know what type of wood this chair is? Cherry?

Thanks!

-- Theo Tobel, Santa Monica


9 replies so far

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5150 posts in 2310 days


#1 posted 02-11-2021 05:11 PM

Hard to tell from the pictures, can you get a better closeup?

The back rest hoop seems to show “roughness” with the grain, but cherry is typically a closed pore wood and very smooth, not the textured grain of something like oak, etc.

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Phil32

1396 posts in 991 days


#2 posted 02-11-2021 05:15 PM

The seat appears to be laminated from several pieces of closed grain wood. The back structure is an open grain such as oak. Why is the identification important?

-- Phil Allin - There are woodworkers and people who collect woodworking tools. The woodworkers have a chair to sit on that they made.

View SMP's profile

SMP

4002 posts in 993 days


#3 posted 02-11-2021 05:32 PM

Looks like Chairy wood to me

(Sorry, i’m a dad)

View tntobel's profile

tntobel

35 posts in 393 days


#4 posted 02-11-2021 08:50 PM



The seat appears to be laminated from several pieces of closed grain wood. The back structure is an open grain such as oak. Why is the identification important?

- Phil32

I am replacing one of the legs…the more and more I look at it I think it is red oak.

-- Theo Tobel, Santa Monica

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

17566 posts in 2226 days


#5 posted 02-11-2021 09:22 PM



Looks like Chairy wood to me

(Sorry, i’m a dad)

- SMP

Now that’s funny :-)

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4461 posts in 2582 days


#6 posted 02-11-2021 10:27 PM

Chairs are often made from different types of wood to take advantage of differences in structural properties of species. Looks like oak was used on bent back piece, and they used a finer grain wood on vertical back supports, seat, and legs. Maple and popular are favorite woods for commercial chairs. ‘Chairy’ wood is not as strong as hard maple, which is why hard maple (or oak) is favorite for chair legs. If cherry had been used on seat or legs, would expect it to be darker as it ages. With even coloration, suggests maple/poplar/oak as likely candidates.
Would need to see close of end grain to help with better ID.

If leg wood is popular that might explain the reason for break? Popular tends to be softer than maple, but most importantly, lighter in weight; which makes it easy to identify.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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tntobel

35 posts in 393 days


#7 posted 02-12-2021 03:08 AM



Chairs are often made from different types of wood to take advantage of differences in structural properties of species. Looks like oak was used on bent back piece, and they used a finer grain wood on vertical back supports, seat, and legs. Maple and popular are favorite woods for commercial chairs. Chairy wood is not as strong as hard maple, which is why hard maple (or oak) is favorite for chair legs. If cherry had been used on seat or legs, would expect it to be darker as it ages. With even coloration, suggests maple/poplar/oak as likely candidates.
Would need to see close of end grain to help with better ID.

If leg wood is popular that might explain the reason for break? Popular tends to be softer than maple, but most importantly, lighter in weight; which makes it easy to identify.

Best Luck.

- CaptainKlutz

Thank you for this. The table legs are light in weight, but seem a bit light in color for poplar, especially the white-ish poplar I have worked with. Do you think it could be red oak?

-- Theo Tobel, Santa Monica

View tntobel's profile

tntobel

35 posts in 393 days


#8 posted 02-12-2021 03:09 AM


Chairs are often made from different types of wood to take advantage of differences in structural properties of species. Looks like oak was used on bent back piece, and they used a finer grain wood on vertical back supports, seat, and legs. Maple and popular are favorite woods for commercial chairs. Chairy wood is not as strong as hard maple, which is why hard maple (or oak) is favorite for chair legs. If cherry had been used on seat or legs, would expect it to be darker as it ages. With even coloration, suggests maple/poplar/oak as likely candidates.
Would need to see close of end grain to help with better ID.

If leg wood is popular that might explain the reason for break? Popular tends to be softer than maple, but most importantly, lighter in weight; which makes it easy to identify.

Best Luck.

- CaptainKlutz

Thank you for this. The table legs are light in weight, but seem a bit light in color for poplar, especially the white-ish poplar I have worked with. Do you think the legs could be red oak?

- tntobel


-- Theo Tobel, Santa Monica

View Cnes's profile

Cnes

8 posts in 1005 days


#9 posted 02-25-2021 05:09 AM

Looks like it oak to me.

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