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Stroke sanders???

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Forum topic by Knockonit posted 01-28-2021 12:38 PM 419 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Knockonit

765 posts in 1210 days


01-28-2021 12:38 PM

I have never used one, but wonder who has, and does it have advantages over conventional drums, or the flat sanders, i’ve seen quite a few in the last year come on the used market, and as noted, since not having any experience was wondering if anyone has first hand, not interested in your cousins, uncles, brother by another mother comments, just first hand and any nuances known
thanks
Rj in az

-- Living the dream


14 replies so far

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ibewjon

2267 posts in 3801 days


#1 posted 01-28-2021 03:02 PM

More movement in more directions means a more varied scratch pattern for a better finish. It also uses more of the sanding belt, or sleeve, meaning less waste.

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pottz

14798 posts in 1993 days


#2 posted 01-28-2021 03:10 PM

i inherited one my dad had,i tried it and then quickly decided to get rid of it.it was large and took up a lot of valuable space and did nothing i already could do with the sanders had.this is probably the reason you see a lot for sale.if i still had mine i would have given it too you too haul away.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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PBWilson1970

185 posts in 402 days


#3 posted 01-28-2021 03:16 PM

I’ve used one a few times in an industrial shop where I was paying for shop time. I used it to work down a rough walnut slab that would have taken quite a bit more time and muscle on their Timesaver wide belt sander. Another guy working at the same time used it to even out a large end grain table he made. It made quick work of the uneven glued up sections.

One advantage is that the wood is stationary so you don’t have to feed it through a sander over and over. It also can remove more wood in a shorter amount of time. It also lets you focus on a high spot, uneven glue line or an area of tearout.

I would imagine that the belts could be more expensive compared to a roll of sandpaper for a drum sander. They are also pretty darn big. If you’ve got the space and a use for an industrial machine, it could work really well.

I hope that helps.

-- I love the smell of sawdust in the morning.

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bigblockyeti

7083 posts in 2729 days


#4 posted 01-28-2021 04:01 PM

We had a 2hp Woodtek at the lumberyard mill work shop I worked in a long time ago. It allows for spot sanding and you can clean the belt far easier than a wide belt or drum sander. As mentioned already, not having to move the work can be a real asset if it’s something heavy that will fit between the drums. Much like a drum or wide belt sander, the direction of sanding is typically with the grain so you won’t get the random scratch pattern like that from a ROS but unlike a ROS, stock removal can be very fast with an low grit belt.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

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Loren

11018 posts in 4656 days


#5 posted 01-28-2021 05:56 PM

I have one. It removes material fast. Unlike drum or wide belt sanders it’s not a calibrating machine that brings work to a precise thickness. On a wide belt you calibrate with the drum and put down the platen for a smooth finish.

There’s some technique to learn to using it but in the right situation it does a lot of sanding quickly.

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Knockonit

765 posts in 1210 days


#6 posted 01-28-2021 06:16 PM



I have one. It removes material fast. Unlike drum or wide belt sanders it s not a calibrating machine that brings work to a precise thickness. On a wide belt you calibrate with the drum and put down the platen for a smooth finish.

There s some technique to learn to using it but in the right situation it does a lot of sanding quickly.

- Loren

THIS, i’d reviewed some comments, and this is my concern, as to flatness and eveness, as noted one would have to get in the “zone’ so to speak to get it reasonably flat.
would an avenue be to use this for a rough finish, and clean up with a drum sander, my big issue with drum sanders is slow, big pieces take 2, belts are an absolute pain in the keyster to change, on both of mine they have that little jawed clip, and some days me fingers rebel and refuse to do my bidding,
my granddaugher loves to make cutting boards, and of course she and i dig in, but sanding a dozen or two on drums wears me down, not sure if i have the space with new shop but am looking at avenues to resolve sanding issue,
thanks to all who have responded
best for the remainder of week
Rj in az

-- Living the dream

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DS

3680 posts in 3429 days


#7 posted 01-28-2021 06:22 PM

The first shop I ever worked for had one. It was scary as hell at first.
If you weren’t careful you could ruin a lot of wood really fast.

IMHO, it became obsolete with the advent of multiple head 52” wide belt sanders.
You get course-sanding through fine-sanding in a single pass on the same, or less, real estate as the stroke sander.

There may be some artisan types out there that can achieve a certain look only by using a stroke sander, but, to me, the value in a production setting is limited.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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Loren

11018 posts in 4656 days


#8 posted 01-28-2021 06:45 PM

There’s no way to get around the wide belt sander if you need calibration and speed.

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CWWoodworking

1491 posts in 1187 days


#9 posted 01-28-2021 10:39 PM

One very unique situation where it excels is very large table tops. Say, a 72” round top.

Place I work uses one to sand large veneer tops.

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pottz

14798 posts in 1993 days


#10 posted 01-28-2021 11:00 PM



One very unique situation where it excels is very large table tops. Say, a 72” round top.

Place I work uses one to sand large veneer tops.

- CWWoodworking


right thats what my dad bought one to do,he could put a table on it.plus the one he had had it’s own on board dust collector.if i had a large shop i probably would have kept it.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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Tony_S

1426 posts in 4091 days


#11 posted 01-28-2021 11:36 PM

I’ve got a 4×10’er in the shop. The only reason I keep it around is to sand large hardwood landing’s. I’ve got 2 overheads, but they’re only 36” sanders.
There’s a definite learning curve to them and as stated above, you can do a lot of damage with one.
Once you get the hang of it though, you can definitely produce a nice flat surface. Everything that comes off of it is still palm sanded though, just to match the sanding on the stairs.

If I didn’t need it for the landing plates, I’d get rid of it…big waste of real estate. They’re almost worthless now, especially the big ones.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

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hcbph_1

92 posts in 322 days


#12 posted 01-28-2021 11:39 PM

Pretty much everyone has stated the obvious on them. I used on back in my school days, marvelous for working on things like table tops or big items. It has a limited usage IMO, but when the job fits it’s a great tool.

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Woodmaster1

1655 posts in 3595 days


#13 posted 01-29-2021 01:55 AM

I had one in my classroom where I taught. It took a 298” belt. The students called it big Wally. The insurance company made us get rid of it because the belt had no guard. No students were ever injured using it in the 30 years we had it. That made no difference to the adjuster.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

7083 posts in 2729 days


#14 posted 01-29-2021 02:33 AM



I had one in my classroom where I taught. It took a 298” belt. The students called it big Wally. The insurance company made us get rid of it because the belt had no guard. No students were ever injured using it in the 30 years we had it. That made no difference to the adjuster.

- Woodmaster1


Logic easily falls on ignorant ears not willing to hear it. No different than those who want to ban assault rifles but don’t know what an assault rifle is.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

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