LumberJocks

Craftsman Lathe

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by Flyarmy posted 01-27-2021 03:15 PM 633 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Flyarmy's profile

Flyarmy

13 posts in 30 days


01-27-2021 03:15 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wood turning wood lathe

Hey guys, I am new to this forum, and i wanted some advice. I am interested in getting in to wood turning, bowls, table legs etc, but haven’t done it since 8th grade wood shop. I saw a used one for $500, and it’s a Craftsman 21750 15 in. Variable Speed Wood Lathe and comes with 8 relatively new tools. No duplicator or copy attachment. is this worth it, (stipulating it is in good working condition)? Or would ya’ll suggest i get a brand new one from Harbor Freight, or other stores. I really don’t want to spend more than $500, any suggestions/advice is appreciated.


27 replies so far

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2265 posts in 3800 days


#1 posted 01-27-2021 04:12 PM

Not familiar with that model, but my guess is anything is better than HF. Is it belt change variable? If electronic speed control, parts may be hard to find.

View Flyarmy's profile

Flyarmy

13 posts in 30 days


#2 posted 01-27-2021 05:36 PM

Thank you for the quick reply ibewjon, i appreciate it. I m pretty sure is is variablle by belt, not by electronic speed control switch. I was considering a Grizzley form the website Offerup, but i sat on the fence too long and someone bought it. below is a link to the Craftsman.

https://offerup.com/item/detail/1055712284/

View Flyarmy's profile

Flyarmy

13 posts in 30 days


#3 posted 01-27-2021 05:54 PM

As it turns out, it is controlled by a knob, not by belt, furthermore, Craftsman no longer makes the lathe so parts would be hard to get, if not impossible.

View WoodenDreams's profile (online now)

WoodenDreams

1254 posts in 918 days


#4 posted 01-27-2021 06:42 PM

Have you checked Facebook Marketplace to see what’s available there.

Highland Woodworking (Atlanta, Ga area) has a Rikon 70-1218VS on sale for $349.99 https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/rikon-12-inch-vs-midi-lathe-70-1218vs.aspx Rikon has a 5 yr warranty. Then you could start out with an inexpensive set of turning chisels.

Penn State Ind. is another way to keep the price down. They always seem to have sales and starter kits. https://www.pennstateind.com/store/mini-lathes.html

As you may know, the lathe is not the really the expensive part. It’s all the accessories that add up.

View greenacres2's profile

greenacres2

357 posts in 3175 days


#5 posted 01-27-2021 07:06 PM

It would push $700 for the lathe, but i really like my Rikon 70-220 VS (12” swing, electronic variable speed in 3 ranges, over 3” of quill travel—handy if you turn an ink pen or 300!!)
earl

View Flyarmy's profile

Flyarmy

13 posts in 30 days


#6 posted 01-27-2021 09:39 PM

Hey Woodendreams, thank you very much for the information as well as the links, i have never heard of either of those websites/companies. Pennstate has the 12 inch Midi lathe, and I like it, it offers the option of getting an extension that would allow me to turn legs or spindles that are 40” from what I can see.

https://www.pennstateind.com/store/KWL-1218VS.html

I believe i am going to go that route, what are your thoughts? and out of curiosity, what is a “midi” lathe, I have always just heard wood lathe or metal lathe?

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5939 posts in 4670 days


#7 posted 01-28-2021 12:00 AM

That Craftsman lathe has a Reeves drive and is a discontinued model with no parts or support … run, don’t walk.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Flyarmy's profile

Flyarmy

13 posts in 30 days


#8 posted 01-28-2021 12:13 AM

Thanks Thedane, after seeing the other options for new ones, I am going that route. I am more than likely getting the 1218vs listed above from PennState. I am guessing it will let me turn any type of hardwood for bowls, as well as spindles, table legs, and even a pen, what do you think?

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

8408 posts in 3206 days


#9 posted 01-28-2021 12:15 AM

That Craftsman lathe has a Reeves drive and is a discontinued model with no parts or support … run, don t walk.
- TheDane

They are also asking for what the thing could be purchased new for… I’ve also seen that lathe bundled with a bunch of other stuff, including a duplicator, for less than $700 new with warranty. Certainly not worth it IMO.

I would also not let speed change methods be a deal breaker… a 4 or 5 speed manual stepped lathe is just as usable as a variable speed one. It only takes a few seconds to swap pulley steps, and over the life of a project, you may only need to change the speed once – maybe twice – so it’s not that big of a deal for me. Pulleys also last a very, very long time.

I’ve only paid as much as $500 for a lathe once, and still think I overpaid. My normal limit is $150 and average is around $50. You would be surprised what $150 can get you if you are patient.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Flyarmy's profile

Flyarmy

13 posts in 30 days


#10 posted 01-28-2021 01:43 AM

Thanks Brad, I appreciate the input. As for the variable speed, I don’t feel like I have to have it, it was just what came with the 12” version I saw on PennState website. Are you saying I can find a good lathe for $150 if I am patient? Can you tell me what brands/models you would trust at that price point? Thanks in advance for your time and advice. That goes for all you guys who have been helping me. I am glad to be a part of this forum and look forward to learning a lot and enjoying a new hobby.

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

939 posts in 2469 days


#11 posted 01-28-2021 03:18 AM


I believe i am going to go that route, what are your thoughts? and out of curiosity, what is a “midi” lathe, I have always just heard wood lathe or metal lathe?

- Flyarmy

Here is a little info on lathes, Mini, vs. Midi, vs. full size
https://www.lathematters.com/what-is-a-midi-lathe/

I think you are on the right track starting with a Midi. The 12” swing makes a good bowl, a great vase, and everything smaller. Plus as you mentioned a bed extension for table legs.

Also, before you buy anything. Contact your local club. You will learn tons of good info, and maybe even find a great deal on used equipment.
I did a web search of Atlanta Woodturning clubs. And got a lot of links. Here is the 1st one.

https://www.atlantawoodturnersguild.org/

and the rest of the web search here,

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=atlanta+wood+turning+clubs&atb=v237-1&ia=web&iai=r1-0&page=1&sexp=%7B%22cdrexp%22%3A%22b%22%2C%22artexp%22%3A%22b%22%2C%22prodexp%22%3A%22b%22%2C%22prdsdexp%22%3A%22c%22%2C%22biaexp%22%3A%22b%22%2C%22msvrtexp%22%3A%22b%22%7D

Good Luck, and Welcome to LJ,

-- John

View Flyarmy's profile

Flyarmy

13 posts in 30 days


#12 posted 01-28-2021 12:22 PM

That was a great article and education about the different types of lathes John, thank you. Also, it never occurred to me that there would be a group of people in my area that get together to talk about wood projects, Thank you for the links. I looked up the one that you listed first, and it’s a couple of hours away from me in light traffic, but after looking at the full list you sent, i found one that meets in Northwest GA which is much closer, so i will link up with them. Thank you for the links and support.

View Flyarmy's profile

Flyarmy

13 posts in 30 days


#13 posted 01-28-2021 05:06 PM

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

8408 posts in 3206 days


#14 posted 01-28-2021 06:49 PM

Don’t they both do the same thing?

Yes and no. Yes – they both hold a work piece so it can be turned – but they do it in different ways.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

6628 posts in 2394 days


#15 posted 01-29-2021 05:23 PM

The chuck has a lot more flexibility. It can be used for both bowl and spindle turning and for bowl turning will allow you to hold a bowl for hollowing without making mounting holes or using something like double side tape for mounting. For example, you may start by mounting on a faceplate to shape the bottom, including adding a tenon or recess that the chuck can grab. You turn it around and grab the tenon or recess with the chuck. Of course then you usually have to then remove the tenon afterwards. You can do all of these things without a chuck but it is just easier with one.

BTW, I would probably go with one of the name brand chucks rather than that Wen you linked to. Unless you can verify that other jaws are available, something like a Nova will be a better long term investment and make it even more useful, especially if you upgrade to a larger lathe down the road.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

showing 1 through 15 of 27 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com