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Cleaning plywood prior to finishing

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Forum topic by Travis posted 01-22-2021 09:24 PM 430 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Travis

491 posts in 773 days


01-22-2021 09:24 PM

I am building my first chest of drawers and I recently added the drawer slides. I am using full extension side-mount slides. A little lubricant from the ball bearings got on my hands and was eventually passed on to the plywood carcass. This is thin veneered plywood so I’m uncomfortable trying to sand the surface clean. Is there another way I can clean the surface prior to applying a finish?

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.


10 replies so far

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1491 posts in 1186 days


#1 posted 01-22-2021 10:25 PM

Wipe it down with lacquer thinner and lightly sand.

Next time don’t put slides in until everything is finished

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

4299 posts in 3355 days


#2 posted 01-22-2021 10:57 PM

acetone or isopropyl alcohol would also be good solvents to remove the lubricant.

Not sure what peso josh is peddling. Someone else can click the link…

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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CWWoodworking

1491 posts in 1186 days


#3 posted 01-23-2021 12:03 AM



acetone or isopropyl alcohol would also be good solvents to remove the lubricant.

Not sure what peso josh is peddling. Someone else can click the link…

- EarlS

Old teds at it again

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6826 posts in 3500 days


#4 posted 01-23-2021 12:04 PM

After you clean it off using one or more of the methods suggested, test it by wiping a cloth spritzed with MS to see if it’s clean. This will mimic the appearance of a finished surface and let you know if you need to keep cleaning.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1756 posts in 608 days


#5 posted 01-23-2021 12:11 PM


acetone or isopropyl alcohol would also be good solvents to remove the lubricant.

Not sure what peso josh is peddling. Someone else can click the link…

- EarlS

Old teds at it again

- CWWoodworking

Yeah, anyone posting a link that has less than ten post gets no clicks. I have noticed that the spammers have gone from random blah to using somewhat relevant content in their attempts.

View Travis's profile

Travis

491 posts in 773 days


#6 posted 01-24-2021 03:00 AM



Next time don’t put slides in until everything is finished

- CWWoodworking

This is interesting, all the tutorials I saw about slides said to finish after slides are placed (removing the slides, of course). Is it standard practice to finish first then install the slides?

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

View Travis's profile

Travis

491 posts in 773 days


#7 posted 01-24-2021 03:01 AM



Wipe it down with lacquer thinner and lightly sand.

...
- CWWoodworking


acetone or isopropyl alcohol would also be good solvents to remove the lubricant.

....
- EarlS


After you clean it off using one or more of the methods suggested, test it by wiping a cloth spritzed with MS to see if it s clean. This will mimic the appearance of a finished surface and let you know if you need to keep cleaning.

- Fred Hargis

Thank you all! I will follow these suggestions.

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1491 posts in 1186 days


#8 posted 01-24-2021 03:40 AM

If I make a chest, I finish the case, top, and fronts. Then assemble everything.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6826 posts in 3500 days


#9 posted 01-24-2021 11:48 AM


This is interesting, all the tutorials I saw about slides said to finish after slides are placed (removing the slides, of course). Is it standard practice to finish first then install the slides?

- Travis

I guess I don’t know what the “standard practice” is, but mine are always installed (and typically removed) before I finish the cabinet. But I’m a hobbyist and my approach (which had s always worked for me) may be different than a commercial shop might do.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2859 posts in 4450 days


#10 posted 01-24-2021 06:22 PM

Like most things try the cleaning method you choose on a scrap first. The solvents may end up causing the grease/oil to spread.
I would also try Naptha which is good ad disolving grease/oil with no residue.

-- Les B, Oregon

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