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Forum topic by Derrick posted 01-21-2021 06:39 PM 341 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Derrick

219 posts in 2145 days


01-21-2021 06:39 PM

My mother is still mourning the loss of their ponderosa pine tree that was in their front yard. My stepdad believed it blocked too much of their view of the water.

Anyhow, one of the kids that cut it down, pulled aside a 3” x 36” slice for her. Her hope was that something could be done to it, to preserve the memory.

It was coated in pentacryl, and wrapped. My little moisture meter showed it at 35% when I got it. Now it’s showing around 13-15%. I’m assuming that number needs to be a little closer to single digits before I can get to work on it? Fine if that’s the case. I’ve got shoulder surgery next week, and all work will be stopping for a bit.

Here are my main concerns.

1. Pine isn’t naturally resistant to rot and this table’s intended use is for outdoors. Seems like a bad idea right off the bat. My hope is that finishing the slice in penetrating epoxy and Epifanes, will help slow its ultimate fate. I could just add refinishing mom’s table to my to do list every year or so.

Is there a better alternative? Of course, not having it outside would be best, but that’s not going to be an option.

2. There are a couple hairline cracks in the slice. None of which look deep. None of them have traveled in the drying process either. My first thought was to add some bow ties to the mix. I scored some free Purple Heart scraps from a local cabinet shop, and I thought adding a couple over the cracks would help offset an otherwise boring piece of wood. I was all set to go with that plan, then I saw that there are different types of bow ties. Decorative and structural. I was looking at decorative ones. No more that 1/4” deep. Structural ones(Dutchman), are much thicker, based off of the thickness of the project.

Should I be thinking along those lines, or since the cracks don’t seem deep and haven’t traveled, I’d be fine with decorative ones? Keep in mind my next question as well.

3. I haven’t fully decided on the legs yet. I may just keep it simple and go with pin legs like every other live edge table. It’s kind of boring to me, but I’m having trouble coming up with a better idea. I’m seeing that sinking C-channel into the bottom side of the table is a good way to counteract movement. The process looks easy. I’m just wondering if there’s a rule of thumb for the size of channel to be used?
Home Depot has 2” x 1/2” x 1/8” thick channel for pretty cheap. Is the 1/2 in depth and the 1/8” I thickness enough?
Is C-channel and epoxy enough for me to get away with decorative inlay on the hairline cracks?

This is for my mom, so none of it is a waste of time. If this is just going to turn into a mess in a couple months, I’m all ears for any suggestions on how to make that not happen.

Any help would be great.

Thank you!!


3 replies so far

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Derrick

219 posts in 2145 days


#1 posted 01-22-2021 02:37 AM

On top of all of this. How does one go about figuring out how much epoxy to buy? This is all end grain, so I figure it’ll be thirsty. Do I just go with a gallon and call it good? Is that WAY too much?

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runswithscissors

3128 posts in 3032 days


#2 posted 01-26-2021 04:54 AM

I think that end grain will soak up a lot of epoxy, especially if it’s quite thin. The more you can get it to penetrate, the more it will protect the wood. The Epifines should have a UV blocker, which will help the epoxy survive.

I would think about pipe legs, say 1.5” diameter or so. Weld a square cap on top of each leg, drilled for fastening screws, and then cross bars, say 1/4” X 2” going from corner to corner. If you con’t weld, it shouldn’t be too expensive to hire it done. I happen to know that plastic pipe caps fit perfectly over 1 1/2” pipe for the bottoms. Paint it up nicely with Rustoleum, and it should look good.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Derrick

219 posts in 2145 days


#3 posted 01-26-2021 05:28 AM



I think that end grain will soak up a lot of epoxy, especially if it s quite thin. The more you can get it to penetrate, the more it will protect the wood. The Epifines should have a UV blocker, which will help the epoxy survive.

I would think about pipe legs, say 1.5” diameter or so. Weld a square cap on top of each leg, drilled for fastening screws, and then cross bars, say 1/4” X 2” going from corner to corner. If you con t weld, it shouldn t be too expensive to hire it done. I happen to know that plastic pipe caps fit perfectly over 1 1/2” pipe for the bottoms. Paint it up nicely with Rustoleum, and it should look good.

- runswithscissors

Pipe is an idea I haven’t thought about yet. I’ll have to look at some google images. The welding wouldn’t be a problem. Are you thinking pipe for a different look, or is there another benefit?

As far as the epoxy goes, do you think I’d cutting it too close with a gallon?

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