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Forum topic by Bieser posted 01-20-2021 06:26 AM 926 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bieser

214 posts in 3041 days


01-20-2021 06:26 AM

So I was approached last week and asked if I had any interest in some wood their family member has and no longer has a need for it (I guess he had a saw mill and cut up a lot of this himself over the years). I didn’t think much of it until I saw some pictures (it was a pretty good pile). I went and looked at it today and I am having a hard time getting my mind around how much is there. Just guessing at least 6000+ board ft (could be more) of lumber it goes on and on. all air dried (all in the rough and lots in slab form) My moisture reader on it was between 5-9%

I would guess and some of it has to be over 40 years old or better. I am a little concerned about insects but didn’t see any obvious signs. A good chunk of it is old pine with very few knots very nice looking stuff, and I suspect the rest is Ash, Oak and Maple. We locally have lots of Elm, but I didn’t immediately see that but assume its in there.

He also has a bunch of crotch chunks hidden away in an old barn covered in layers of bird crap they told me he was always telling them that was his “gun stock stash”

The lumber varies in sizes from 12/4 to 4/4 and all appears to have been stored correctly as it is straight. I’m struggling to come up with a number for the family on what would be fair, without measuring every board and putting a hand plane on all of it to come up with exactly what all of it is and how much. It seems to be organized in different species but then there is an entire attic full of a mixed bag. Anyone have any thoughts on how to approach this or do I just shoot them a number I think is safe? Should I be concerned about bugs at this point? I would also be bringing this into my current lumber storage. I have several thousand BF in there, I would hate to see this cause issues? Am I over thinking this?

Thanks Brandon


24 replies so far

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AlaskaGuy

6396 posts in 3316 days


#1 posted 01-20-2021 06:43 AM

Good find. Air dried lumber at 5-9 % amazing.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Bieser

214 posts in 3041 days


#2 posted 01-20-2021 06:46 AM

I was caught off with that too, we live in a very dry climate so it doesn’t surprise me. But it could have been kiln dried too, I’m going off limited info, I was told it wasn’t.

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AlaskaGuy

6396 posts in 3316 days


#3 posted 01-20-2021 07:05 AM

Which Strasburg do you live in? PA or VA or other?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Bieser

214 posts in 3041 days


#4 posted 01-20-2021 07:07 AM

Well my that’s my old area, but Strasburg Colorado. I live now on the edge of Colorado and Nebraska

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AlaskaGuy

6396 posts in 3316 days


#5 posted 01-20-2021 07:19 AM

When I click on your website it sets of my


Well my that s my old area, but Strasburg Colorado. I live now on the edge of Colorado and Nebraska

- Bieser

Do you have a website? I swear when I looked at your profile, it listed a website. Just looked again and it’s gone.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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CaptainKlutz

4135 posts in 2501 days


#6 posted 01-20-2021 11:49 AM

IMHO – price depends on grading, condition, and ease of transport?
Graded lumber, banded into bundles for easy load/transport; earns highest prices.
Animal poop covered unknown species & grade are worth a lot less, especially since it only costs 30-40 cents/bdft to mill an average log. Location matters too as transportation/handling costs add up fast.

Considering inexpensive species like; ash, oak, hickory, poplar, and maple kiln dried sell commercially for < $2 bdft plus shipping by truck load at forest; my starting price for air dried barn wood is always lot less.

Your bug concerns are valid. It is not recommended to store kiln dried wood and air dried wood in same commercial storage space. Live edge air dried lumber transportation falls under the same classification as firewood transportation, and is banned in many areas.

IME – Most professional cabinet/furniture builders only buy proper kiln dried lumber as kiln certification is required for transportation of wood product out of city or state. If professional has to send the lumber into kiln cycle for bug free certification, the value drops ~$1-$1.5 bdft due extra handling and kiln costs. So unless there is some exciting figure, most professionals won’t bother with air dried stash.

Have stumbled across a couple of air dried sawmill stashes that wanted to unload the entire estate all at once. Never paid more than $2 bdft for FAS grade bundle domestic (except walnut cost me ~$3). Usually pay ~$1 bdft for random species/grades. Have bought wild burl figure walnut, birdseye maple, or heavy tiger stripe silver maple for more; but it was planed, graded and obviously higher value.

#IAMAKLUTZ not an expert. YMMV

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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Kudzupatch

113 posts in 2215 days


#7 posted 01-20-2021 01:54 PM

I know you want to be fair to the family. I would too. But keep in mind you are taking all the risks here. Put your emotions aside. As my Grandparents would said, You are buying a Pig in a Poke, so you don’t know what you are getting and how much, if any is any good.

You might get lucky and find gold. you may find trash. Based on that I would go on the low end and wouldn’t feel bad about it. No smart person is going to offer retail buying blind.

-- Jeff Horton * Kudzu Craft skin boats* www.kudzucraft.com

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Robert

4435 posts in 2487 days


#8 posted 01-20-2021 02:15 PM

I don’t know what borer issue is out there, but where I am its a serious problem with air drying.

Very difficult to see insect damage in rough lumber. Look for sawdust between boards.

Take a hand plane and check the pine for beetles.

If you’re planning to resell its very important to guarantee insect free lumber.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Bieser

214 posts in 3041 days


#9 posted 01-20-2021 03:00 PM

I had a website, I let it go and found out a few weeks ago that it took you too some china virus website. I didnt realize it was still up on here so I deleted it.

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Bieser

214 posts in 3041 days


#10 posted 01-20-2021 03:10 PM

I agree with everything that has been said, these are all issues I have been considering, I am building a dehumidification kiln as we speak, I am thinking that maybe I should put all of this lumber in the kiln for 3-5 hours and crank the heat up to the 130s, I don’t think it needs dried out but to kill any insects before going into my lumber.

I was kinda thinking that $1.00 bd ft range myself for everything they have, but maybe I am high? I didn’t see any walnut or exotics (I wouldn’t expect to see any either kinda knowing the situation) except for a few pieces that I don’t think really make a difference on a big purchase like this.

This guy made some beautiful cabinets over the years in my community, As straight as the lumber is and a lot of it is stacked vertically makes me wonder if it wasn’t kiln dried and they family doesn’t know. I really have no way of knowing.

And maybe I can make a deal that if we start loading it and it has some insect problems we maybe have to back price off.

I would like to have it and its handy to my place only a few miles away, I just don’t need it bad enough to over pay for anything.

Brandon

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LeeRoyMan

1533 posts in 734 days


#11 posted 01-20-2021 03:18 PM

I wouldn’t make an offer.

I would explain the risks and mention the amount of labor involved to move it,
then tell them that you wouldn’t want to insult them with a price too low, because of those factors.
Explain that you would be more comfortable with them giving you a number, and letting you decide.

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Bieser

214 posts in 3041 days


#12 posted 01-20-2021 03:30 PM

Think $1 is too high?

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2873 posts in 3645 days


#13 posted 01-20-2021 03:38 PM

I have bought cherry at 85 cents per board foot delivered 50 miles.

Can you and will you use that much lumber of this kind?

Do you have some buddies you can divide it with now or later?

If you think there is 7K bf AND YOU CAN USE IT, I would offer $6k tops, maybe only $5K.

It may turn out to be less wood than that and of lower quality than you thought.

Assume it has bugs in it. It does. It can still be ok. It’s not all eaten up so it’s obviously not a disaster but a nuisance. I don’t think 130 F for a couple of hours would be enough. I would say a couple of days.

But out there where you are, there are fewer trees, yes? So maybe lumber runs higher.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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bigblockyeti

7079 posts in 2727 days


#14 posted 01-20-2021 04:57 PM



Think $1 is too high?

- Bieser

Might be, I think the major liabilities involved all have to be taken into consideration are:
1) Hidden insects
2) Labor for loading, hauling and unloading/stacking
3) Warehousing space & time
4) Marketing anything you can’t/won’t use
5) Transportation costs

Family further complicates things as close or distant family could make negotiations better/worse depending on emotions. My grandma had an 80 acre golf course covered with some valuable hardwood and thousands of good sized cedar trees. I considered buying a $40K mill and making a full time job of logging and milling wood for ~4-6 months after she sold but while she still had full access and rights to any and everything on the property (as it was to be completely leveled). Her emotional attachment to the way it looked as a golf course and perpetual war against logic thwarted that opportunity to the tune of at least $100K for her and again for myself. My aunt across the street watched as 196 full log trucks left the property full of logs destined for some mill somewhere. Quick work of everything valuable was made with multiple hydro-ax machines one forwarder, three skidders a tub grinder and two Prentice style loaders. While the investment in equipment was no doubt substantial, someone profited well from her standing timber, all because of family!

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

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AlaskaGuy

6396 posts in 3316 days


#15 posted 01-20-2021 05:00 PM



I had a website, I let it go and found out a few weeks ago that it took you too some china virus website. I didnt realize it was still up on here so I deleted it.

- Bieser

That explains why the first time I clicked on your website it set off my antivirus software.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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