LumberJocks

Carriage Garage Doors?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by Derrick posted 01-19-2021 05:35 PM 525 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Derrick's profile

Derrick

219 posts in 2145 days


01-19-2021 05:35 PM

We’ve come to the conclusion that we need to reimagine the layout of our 1-car garage. Right now, it’s a mix of unorganized storage, and my unorganized woodworking tools. Essentially, we need to pull everything out and start with a blank slate. We’ve determined that the best course of action is to split up the garage into two separate spaces. One for storage and one for me. My side will be the side with the garage door. Right now it’s just your run-of-the-mill metal, roll-up door. Since we only have 8’ ceilings, the track for the door really cuts into the space. My thought was, what if we had swing out doors installed?

After some searching, I realized there aren’t very many people in my area that handle those types of doors. Because of that, prices are a bit crazy. I’m seeing anywhere from $3k to $6k. So, my wife floated the idea of me building them.
Looking around, I didn’t see a lot of info. I was hoping for a book possibly. Not much there. If anyone knows of any, it would be greatly appreciated.

Then I came across this article:

https://www.finehomebuilding.com/2012/03/08/dress-up-a-garage-door-with-insulated-carriage-doors

The PDF version: https://www.finehomebuilding.com/membership/pdf/6752/021226048.pdf

The design is perfect for what we’re looking for. Not too fancy, but 100% improvement in looks from our current door. My question is: Is the design sound?

The article seems to address some of the questions that I had about wood movement and whatnot. What about the pocket screws? Are those a good option for the frame? The few examples I’ve seen for carriage doors, all use mortise and tenon joints.

The article also uses Meranti, which I’m sure I could find, but I’m also wondering what else could be used. The door will be painted white, so none of the wood will be shown off. I have a place right down the street that sells decking, and their low grade is Batu(?). I don’t know much about it, but it seems to be pretty weather resistant. The prices seem pretty good. As long as paint sticks to it, I’m hoping that would be a decent alternative.

This design seems straight forward, and feels like something I could learn a lot from along the way. Does anyone see any huge issues?

Im open to any and all suggestions. Pricing things out, It’d be WAY under what it’d cost to have someone come out and do it. Like I said earlier, I’m up for the challenge. I’ll just ask questions along the way. One thing I saw on YouTube, is that it might be possible to install these while the roll up door is in place. That’s be pretty awesome, because I would be under pressure to get it up in a short amount of time, once the old door is down.

Any help would be awesome.

Thank you.


27 replies so far

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1756 posts in 608 days


#1 posted 01-19-2021 05:54 PM

I would favor mortise and tenon joints over pocket screws.

If you plan on removing the existing door don’t. The springs are under a lot of tension and can be deadly without the proper tools to release them.

View Derrick's profile

Derrick

219 posts in 2145 days


#2 posted 01-19-2021 05:56 PM



I would favor mortise and tenon joints over pocket screws.

If you plan on removing the existing door don t. The springs are under a lot of tension and can be deadly without the proper tools to release them.

- controlfreak

Great info there. I did see something about that in my searches. I’ll have to look into it more.

Thank you!

View metolius's profile

metolius

296 posts in 1737 days


#3 posted 01-19-2021 07:28 PM

With the LSL core sandwiched b/n ply skins with construction adhesive, I don’t think mortise joinery would add much stability. Also, mortising LSL sounds like a frustrating task; may require considering solid wood 2×4.

RE Batu ? Ive no experience with that, but readings express a good reputation for outdoor use. I looked up its janka rating: 2100. That’s tough and heavy wood.

Overall, the pdf plan looks sound to me. A lot of oppty for disappointment is in the swing of the doors. I would be very intent on ensuring the hinge installation is precise, solid, and with quality hardware.

-- derek / oregon

View Derrick's profile

Derrick

219 posts in 2145 days


#4 posted 01-19-2021 07:51 PM



With the LSL core sandwiched b/n ply skins with construction adhesive, I don t think mortise joinery would add much stability. Also, mortising LSL sounds like a frustrating task; may require considering solid wood 2×4.

RE Batu ? Ive no experience with that, but readings express a good reputation for outdoor use. I looked up its janka rating: 2100. That s tough and heavy wood.

Overall, the pdf plan looks sound to me. A lot of oppty for disappointment is in the swing of the doors. I would be very intent on ensuring the hinge installation is precise, solid, and with quality hardware.

- metolius

So, by that are you saying the pocket holes would be just fine, or should I look more into solid wood and M&T joinery?

And as far as hinge installation goes. That’s a huge concern, and where I stand to learn the most. I’ve done various cabinet, shed and entry doors in our house. The finished products have turned out fine, but getting from A to B has never been a walk in the park. With the possibility of being able to keep the existing door in place, it would allow me to make sure things are perfect.

View metolius's profile

metolius

296 posts in 1737 days


#5 posted 01-19-2021 07:59 PM



So, by that are you saying the pocket holes would be just fine, or should I look more into solid wood and M&T joinery?

Yes. The design keeps the door square with the front/back plywood skins. The LSL joinery doesn’t participate in that.

-- derek / oregon

View Derrick's profile

Derrick

219 posts in 2145 days


#6 posted 01-19-2021 08:01 PM


Yes. The design keeps the door square with the front/back plywood skins. The LSL joinery doesn t participate in that.

- metolius

Nice. Ok. That’s great to know.

Thank you!

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

1030 posts in 393 days


#7 posted 01-19-2021 08:15 PM

My fence is Batu (Red Balau). Very hard and tough stuff that looks like mahogany under oil. A coat of Messmer’s Oil every two years will keep it looking new. It’s supposed to be very weather and insect resistant and in 10 years, mine hasn’t changed. Many call it the 100 year fence, including the dealer of course.

-- Darrel

View Kudzupatch's profile

Kudzupatch

113 posts in 2215 days


#8 posted 01-19-2021 08:15 PM

This is right up my alley. I built a two sets about 12+ years ago on our house. Even modified the garage door openers to open and close them and all the safety features to work too.

I made mine using loose tennons. Easier than true tennons and just about as strong. I used cypress for the door frames. Nice and light and has been only the least bit of warping. Not enough to be an issue at all.

Only two things I would differently, one, use a thicker material. I could only find 5/4’s cypress so they finished out right at 1’ thick. Next set I am going to order som 2” thick stock. (This house is going up for sale and I am going to build the doors for the next one too.)

Second, I would caulk the panels with the best caulking I could find. Probably 3m 4200 marine grade caulk.

Here is a link to my old web site and the doors I built. Would love to redo this web site. I did it years ago and things have changed a lot since then. I have not used it in years either.

http://www.kudzupatch.com/woodshop/gdoors/index.shtml

-- Jeff Horton * Kudzu Craft skin boats* www.kudzucraft.com

View Derrick's profile

Derrick

219 posts in 2145 days


#9 posted 01-19-2021 09:05 PM



This is right up my alley. I built a two sets about 12+ years ago on our house. Even modified the garage door openers to open and close them and all the safety features to work too.

I made mine using loose tennons. Easier than true tennons and just about as strong. I used cypress for the door frames. Nice and light and has been only the least bit of warping. Not enough to be an issue at all.

Only two things I would differently, one, use a thicker material. I could only find 5/4 s cypress so they finished out right at 1 thick. Next set I am going to order som 2” thick stock. (This house is going up for sale and I am going to build the doors for the next one too.)

Second, I would caulk the panels with the best caulking I could find. Probably 3m 4200 marine grade caulk.

Here is a link to my old web site and the doors I built. Would love to redo this web site. I did it years ago and things have changed a lot since then. I have not used it in years either.

http://www.kudzupatch.com/woodshop/gdoors/index.shtml

- Kudzupatch

Well, that’s getting saved to my favorites! I did see on YouTube, a guy building some doors in a similar fashion. He was using a festool. Looked a lot nicer than what we’re going for, but helpful info regardless. There’s a guy who did a 5 part series on installing some prefab doors made from Azek(?) material. Looked really slick as well. I think if I compile enough info, I should be alright.

Thank you very much for your insight!

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

500 posts in 2741 days


#10 posted 01-20-2021 02:39 PM

I did this very thing about 10-12 years ago. I wasn’t a very experienced woodworker at that point, so I used all BORG lumber. I did something very similar to the plans in your post, but I only have one layer of ply on each side of the framing. I used 2×2s for the frame and the pink rigid foam insulation between framing members. I used 1×4s for the decorative framing. The exterior side uses ply rated for weather, like the siding used for sheds. Everything was painted with an exterior paint like any other exterior door.

I built it before I knew about pocket screws, so all joints are butt joints with screws from the outside. With the ply on both sides they are very stable, but I don’t open them often. It was an attached garage that we turned into a playroom for the kids. Now that the kids are grown, it is used more like a finished basement (we’re slab on grade so we don’t have an actual basement).

Since it was intended as extra living space rather than a garage, I also bought vinyl windows that can be opened and put them in. They are much heavier than the single pane of glass or plexi most people would use for a garage. When I do open them, they swing out easily.

If you have the bolts of the hinges exposed, I’d recommend adding a bit of security to the doors so someone can’t happen by with a cordless impact driver and just take the doors off. See my shed door video at the 15:49 mark to see how I embed a hanger bolt to prevent the doors from being removed without being unlocked and opened.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

View Derrick's profile

Derrick

219 posts in 2145 days


#11 posted 01-20-2021 03:00 PM

Just subscribed. Thank you for the info!!

Yeah. That article uses vinyl windows as well. They just strip them down and use the glass. The prices have changed for what they’re talking about, but all things remaining the same, they still wouldn’t be a huge expenditure, as compared to the cost of having custom doors made by a professional.

I’m feeling better about all of this!

View Blindhog's profile

Blindhog

184 posts in 2055 days


#12 posted 01-20-2021 04:13 PM

I built my garage doors from similar fine woodworking plans and they have held up well over the last 5 years. I used Dominos for the joinery and glued the ply skins on each side to end up with a quasi-torsion box effect. Hinges have held up very well and I have been pleased both aesthetically and performance wise.
Good luck in your project.

-- Don't let perfection get in the way of plenty good enough

View Derrick's profile

Derrick

219 posts in 2145 days


#13 posted 01-20-2021 04:30 PM



I built my garage doors from similar fine woodworking plans and they have held up well over the last 5 years. I used Dominos for the joinery and glued the ply skins on each side to end up with a quasi-torsion box effect. Hinges have held up very well and I have been pleased both aesthetically and performance wise.
Good luck in your project.

- Blindhog

Damn. Those look nice! Might you have any build up pictures of them? Also, are they only opened from the inside? What does your lock situation look like?

View Blindhog's profile

Blindhog

184 posts in 2055 days


#14 posted 01-20-2021 05:03 PM

Thanks, I think they turned out good. I’ve attached some pics of locking situation. Yes, they can only be opened from the inside. Just used a 1×4 for T-astragal to cover gap at doors. Built per the attached design and used Lexan for glazing in shop built frames. Used 2×4 & 2×6 SPF for frames, ran them through the planer to flatten edges for increased gluing surface. Styrofoam board insulation and covered with ply. Added dentals below sill frame.

Strap hinges

Feel free to PM me if you want additional info

-- Don't let perfection get in the way of plenty good enough

View Derrick's profile

Derrick

219 posts in 2145 days


#15 posted 01-20-2021 05:24 PM

Which issue of FWW is that? I can’t make it out on my phone.

I’ll definitely pm you when I run into trouble.

Thank you very much for everything you’ve posted. Much appreciated.

showing 1 through 15 of 27 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com