LumberJocks

Is this a terrible idea?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Joinery forum

Forum topic by Gabeisafabricator posted 01-19-2021 02:04 PM 666 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Gabeisafabricator's profile

Gabeisafabricator

8 posts in 43 days


01-19-2021 02:04 PM

Topic tags/keywords: joinery cnc stability wood expansion wood connection desk legs dovetail oak joining

wondering how vulnerable this joint is. I was planning on cutting a lot of the components on my cnc hence the rounded connection. Plan to build out of rift white oak.

thanks


24 replies so far

View Meisterburger's profile

Meisterburger

32 posts in 248 days


#1 posted 01-19-2021 03:22 PM

It’s essentially a dovetail type connection. Just don’t make the neck too skinny and fragile

View Hammerthumb's profile (online now)

Hammerthumb

3086 posts in 2985 days


#2 posted 01-19-2021 03:46 PM

The joint shown would be more susceptible to glue failure and racking than a dovetail joint. I wouldn’t use either for this assembly as other joints would be much stronger.

-- Paul, Duvall, WA

View Madmark2's profile (online now)

Madmark2

2306 posts in 1598 days


#3 posted 01-19-2021 04:05 PM

Build one. Stack sandbags on it until it fails. Then you will know.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3673 posts in 2807 days


#4 posted 01-19-2021 04:18 PM

Too me it looks overly complicated with the puzzle style joints.
I like the overall design of the piece. Instead of trying to invent new joints I think some thru tenons round or square would be nice. And far stronger.

-- Aj

View CWWoodworking's profile (online now)

CWWoodworking

1502 posts in 1188 days


#5 posted 01-19-2021 05:44 PM

The joint is plenty strong.

The top board where it extends downward to meet leg is the weak part. I would shorten it a little.

View DainCityLJ's profile

DainCityLJ

7 posts in 90 days


#6 posted 01-19-2021 05:58 PM

Racking is the main concern here, single rail at the bottom will not be enough to resist racking. Consider cross bracing the back legs. I think the joint should be okay if the overall structure is beefed up a bit.

-- Will, Any weekend envolving saw dust is a good one.

View AlaskaGuy's profile (online now)

AlaskaGuy

6398 posts in 3319 days


#7 posted 01-19-2021 06:26 PM

My question would be why use a joint like that in the first place?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2882 posts in 3648 days


#8 posted 01-19-2021 06:38 PM



My question would be why use a joint like that in the first place?

- AlaskaGuy

I think to OP indicated that it was no trouble to cut it on his CNC, so why not?

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

View Meisterburger's profile

Meisterburger

32 posts in 248 days


#9 posted 01-19-2021 07:52 PM

He wants his CNC to do the hard part instead of making a mortise, and sizing the tenon perfectly

View CWWoodworking's profile (online now)

CWWoodworking

1502 posts in 1188 days


#10 posted 01-19-2021 08:14 PM



He wants his CNC to do the hard part instead of making a mortise, and sizing the tenon perfectly

- Meisterburger

It’s just wood and they are making it pretty. Don’t over think it.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

11021 posts in 4657 days


#11 posted 01-19-2021 08:39 PM

Make some samples and see how strong the assembly is. You don’t have to build the whole desk to make and break a side.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3673 posts in 2807 days


#12 posted 01-19-2021 08:47 PM

A mortise and tenon connection is as good as it gets. Since it’s concealed it doesn’t add a visual distraction to the piece.

-- Aj

View CWWoodworking's profile (online now)

CWWoodworking

1502 posts in 1188 days


#13 posted 01-19-2021 09:13 PM

The problem area is the blue line. When you cut the hole for the round peg, you are cutting that piece in half. Since that piece of wood looks to be only about 4”, that doesn’t leave much meat. If you would move the peg up into the skirt more(black line), you gain the strength of the whole board.

View AlaskaGuy's profile (online now)

AlaskaGuy

6398 posts in 3319 days


#14 posted 01-19-2021 09:18 PM


My question would be why use a joint like that in the first place?

- AlaskaGuy

I think to OP indicated that it was no trouble to cut it on his CNC, so why not?

- Ocelot


Well I didn’t suggest he not do it, so I won’t answer the question “why not”. Looking at his handle maybe this is a business, and he’s planing a production run. Maybe just because he can. Maybe he’s a hobbyist playing with his CNC. Who knows, that is why I asked.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Gabeisafabricator's profile

Gabeisafabricator

8 posts in 43 days


#15 posted 01-20-2021 01:25 AM

The joint shown would be more susceptible to glue failure and racking than a dovetail joint. I wouldn’t use either for this assembly as other joints would be much stronger.

- Hammerthumb

racking was my main concern. Thanks for the input

showing 1 through 15 of 24 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com