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Forum topic by CWWoodworking posted 01-16-2021 04:27 PM 686 views 0 times favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CWWoodworking

1491 posts in 1186 days


01-16-2021 04:27 PM

And know as much about opera singing as I do turning.

Generally when looking for a new tool, my first stop in researching is grizzly. Sometimes I buy there stuff, sometimes not.

Wanting to turn furniture parts and possibly of bowls.

I guess my question is what would be a couple machines to look into? How much to budget for everything?(not scared of spending a little). Any decent books you recommend?

Thanks


33 replies so far

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SMP

3426 posts in 912 days


#1 posted 01-16-2021 04:31 PM

Furniture parts as in table legs?

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CWWoodworking

1491 posts in 1186 days


#2 posted 01-16-2021 04:33 PM

Ya, possibly bedpost parts.

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Phil32

1312 posts in 910 days


#3 posted 01-16-2021 04:41 PM

I would recommend that you first take a class or demonstration of turning at a local woodworking shop or woodturning club. Keep you eyes on the projects you want to accomplish rather than tool acquisition.

-- Phil Allin - There are woodworkers and people who collect woodworking tools. The woodworkers have a chair to sit in.

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Lazyman

6628 posts in 2394 days


#4 posted 01-16-2021 05:16 PM

You will need a fairly long bed to handle bed posts so look at the distance between centers and compare that to the length of the bedposts you would like to do. Note that you should add an inches or two for parting off the ends. Also make sure that the distance between centers in their specs includes the drive and live centers. If you use other 3rd party centers, you may lose or gain some depending upon design. For bowls, the absolute minimum swing would be 12” unless you just want to make small bowls but I would shoot for a minimum of 16” to be able to handle something a little bit larger. Again, you usually lose an inch or two from the starting blank.

I have a Laguna Revo 18/36. (18” swing 36” between centers). I’ve been happy with it. They sell a 20” and 12” bed extension if you need to increase the distance between center and the 20” one can be used to increase the swing too. Another one to consider is the Nova Galaxy DVR. I think it has a swing of 16” and 44” between centers. It may also feature a pivoting head stock that allows you to do outboard turning greater than 16” by adding an outboard tool rest. I am sure that Grizzly has some lathes that will handle what you want and may be less expensive.

Other expenses: HHS Turning tools—I would plan a minimum of $200 to get started (you want good quality steel tools)
  • Roughing Gouge
  • Skew Chisel
  • 2 sizes of spindle gouges
  • Bowl gouge
  • At least one scraper.

Carbide Turning tools—not a necessity but a couple of tools can be handy $150

Chuck: Plan at least $150 for chuck with a couple different size jaws—might be more like $200. Also not a necessity, especially for spindle turning (legs and bedposts), but very handy for bowls and can still be quite handy when turning spindles.

And then plan to double the cost of tools again within a couple of years—you know you’ll want to.

EDIT: I forgot to mention sharpening. You will need a good sharpening setup. So depending upon what you currently have (slow speed grinder for example), you could spend another $100-$200 on that.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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OSU55

2736 posts in 2996 days


#5 posted 01-16-2021 07:30 PM

I agree with finding a woodturning club to help you understand lathes, tools, accessories, etc. Can search for AAW chapters here https://www.woodturner.org/Woodturner/AAWConnects/AAW-Connects.aspx.

The Nova Galaxi does have a pivoting headstock with a bolt on outboard toolrest. I have that setup. With the 16” swing, I can turn 15’ bowls inboard, which is a big bowl for indoor use.

There are a lot of lathes for under $1000 that can do furniture parts just fine, including the HF 34706, but faceplate (bowl, platter) is a different story. Griz G0842 could be a good one for furniture parts, $600 with a copy attachment. 3/4hp is enough for most spindle work and this lathe makes it easy to reproduce a shape. Your best bet may be the Griz copy lathe for furniture and then a “bowl” lathe for faceplate work if you end up enjoying it. The G0842 could do some 10” bowls and give you an idea whether you like it. No, it’s not a high feature lathe (heavy cast bed, big motor, etc) because it doesn’t have to be for 3-4” dia spindles. Duplicating spindle parts without a copy/duplicator attachment is doable, but is slow, frustrating, and not a lot of fun.

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CWWoodworking

1491 posts in 1186 days


#6 posted 01-16-2021 08:10 PM

I was looking at G0842 and G0642

The small motor and light weight scares me a little on the 842. Should I not worry as much about that?

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TheDane

5939 posts in 4670 days


#7 posted 01-16-2021 09:09 PM


I was looking at G0842 and G0642

The small motor and light weight scares me a little on the 842. Should I not worry as much about that?

- CWWoodworking

You do not want to buy a lathe with a Reeves drive (like the G0842) ... they are prone to mechanical problems and have a minimum speed that is way too fast for any out-of-balance load. Grizzly’s G0642 is a boring machine … not sure what lathe you were looking at.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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CWWoodworking

1491 posts in 1186 days


#8 posted 01-16-2021 09:21 PM

g0462

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TheDane

5939 posts in 4670 days


#9 posted 01-16-2021 09:52 PM

g0462

- CWWoodworking

Another Reeves drive …

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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tvrgeek

1388 posts in 2656 days


#10 posted 01-16-2021 10:11 PM

The lathe is the cheap part. Tools will break the bank.
I have come to the realization there is no such thing as a too big or too heavy woodworking machine. Buy big, or buy again. Guess I am lucky as I don’t have room for one.

The Rikon has a DVR drive. I suspect others do or soon will. Remembering back to high school shop, it would be nice to rough out a blank and then just crank it up as it gets balanced.

Reeves drive can be totally reliable and can have a wide ratio. Not that some on the market fail at both. I suspect DVR is cheaper than reliable Reeves.

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tvrgeek

1388 posts in 2656 days


#11 posted 01-16-2021 10:14 PM

Don’t forget to look at Harvey.

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AndyJ1s

485 posts in 762 days


#12 posted 01-16-2021 10:26 PM

IIRC, Reeves drives cannot change speed unless running. So if you left it on high speed (sanding/finishing) the last time you used it, then mount an off-balance bowl blank before you turn it on to lower the speed, look out!

I have a Nova Galaxy and like it a lot. I purchased it before I retired, and set it up in a friend’s shop (he needed a heavier lathe to do some off-axis stuff). He enjoyed the heck out of it.

He has since passed away, and it is now in my shop. l think I enjoyed it more in his shop…

-- Andy - Arlington TX

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Phil32

1312 posts in 910 days


#13 posted 01-16-2021 11:14 PM

Whatever lathe you choose, plan for an incredible amount of chips and wood dust. If you put it in a 20×20 ft. space, there will be debris in every square inch of the space. Cover everything you don’t want dusted.

-- Phil Allin - There are woodworkers and people who collect woodworking tools. The woodworkers have a chair to sit in.

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bondogaposis

5949 posts in 3358 days


#14 posted 01-17-2021 12:08 AM

Remember that the lathe is just about the cheapest part of turning. Once you start buying turning tools, scroll chucks, and any of the bajillion accessories available you’ll find that they really add up.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2265 posts in 3800 days


#15 posted 01-17-2021 02:44 AM

Don’t be scared by used. I found a 1973 (year) powermatic 90. 12” x 36 long. HEAVY. Less than $500. Yes, a reeves drive, but an old reliable one. There is also a model 45.

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