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Glue or No Glue

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Forum topic by Joel J posted 01-15-2021 06:39 PM 463 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joel J

62 posts in 2947 days


01-15-2021 06:39 PM

Ok, here’s the question. I have this exterior white oak patio table roughed out. The perimeter ring is 1 1/4” thick and has a rabbet routed in the bottom that you can’t see that the 13/16” x 4” wide “slats” are sitting on. In the picture I have 1/4” MDF spacers between the slats but those will be eliminated after I have completed the assembly. My original plan was to just install the slats with #8×1” bronze countersunk screws through the bottom of the rabbet into the slats for a blind connection. When I dropped the slats into the frame this morning I had the thought that maybe I should glue the slats in as well with TB III. This would not only help secure the slats into the frame but would also help fill the miniscule space between the slats and the frame. I would love to hear your thoughts on “glue or no glue”. As always, thanks for the thoughts!

-- Joel, Denver, CO


9 replies so far

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1461 posts in 1968 days


#1 posted 01-15-2021 06:56 PM

The screws should be fine with the correct glue.

Not my first rodeo with exterior wood tops. Mine are T&G with wood stiffeners

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Joel J

62 posts in 2947 days


#2 posted 01-15-2021 07:12 PM

Jack, just out of curiosity, what glue do you recommend for my situation? Thanks.

-- Joel, Denver, CO

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3670 posts in 2806 days


#3 posted 01-15-2021 07:26 PM

I think it a good idea to use glue for the simple reason it helps to keep water out of small voids. Although this will be temporary all outdoor projects have short life’s.
The only out tables I’ve built were picnic style but have built lots of doors or fancy gates. I like the expanding poly glue
It’s very good for filling in spaces .
Good Luck

-- Aj

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JackDuren

1461 posts in 1968 days


#4 posted 01-15-2021 07:40 PM

I believe it was titebond 3.

This was Eucalyptus Red Grandis

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SMP

3429 posts in 914 days


#5 posted 01-15-2021 08:06 PM

I also use TB3 for outdoor stuff. Just keep in mind wood movement when gluing larger areas.

View 4wood's profile

4wood

87 posts in 962 days


#6 posted 01-16-2021 02:05 PM

I would suggest checking out the thickened West Systems G/Flex epoxy. It come in the thin version or the thickened. The thick is about the consistency of a tooth paste and does not run all over. It is flexible which is good for wood movement. The tensile elongation is 32.7%. Working time is 75 minuets. It has been on the market for over 10 years and is good for adhering dissimilar materials. Don’t worry about buying a little extra, you will find many uses for it and like other epoxies the shelf life is in years. Attach is the link to the technical data sheet and also to a video they made. In the video they cut a plastic kayak in half and glued it back together and put it through a rather strong test. Here is a discussion on Woodweb where someone had a problem with the joints coming apart on the outer ring of a table similar to yours.

https://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/forums/aw.pl?read=847401

https://www.westsystem.com/wp-content/uploads/G-flex-tds.pdf

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=g%2fflex+canoe+video&docid=608045057598229669&mid=22908B2836B15B62B46122908B2836B15B62B461&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

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JackDuren

1461 posts in 1968 days


#7 posted 01-16-2021 06:03 PM



I would suggest checking out the thickened West Systems G/Flex epoxy. It come in the thin version or the thickened. The thick is about the consistency of a tooth paste and does not run all over. It is flexible which is good for wood movement. The tensile elongation is 32.7%. Working time is 75 minuets. It has been on the market for over 10 years and is good for adhering dissimilar materials. Don t worry about buying a little extra, you will find many uses for it and like other epoxies the shelf life is in years. Attach is the link to the technical data sheet and also to a video they made. In the video they cut a plastic kayak in half and glued it back together and put it through a rather strong test. Here is a discussion on Woodweb where someone had a problem with the joints coming apart on the outer ring of a table similar to yours.

https://www.woodweb.com/cgi-bin/forums/aw.pl?read=847401

https://www.westsystem.com/wp-content/uploads/G-flex-tds.pdf

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=g%2fflex+canoe+video&docid=608045057598229669&mid=22908B2836B15B62B46122908B2836B15B62B461&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

- 4wood

Why?

View LesB's profile

LesB

2861 posts in 4451 days


#8 posted 01-17-2021 12:06 AM

Another alternative for exterior water proof glue is Uretthane glue (Gorilla glue). It needs to be well clamped because it will expand durning the curing….which is good because it seals any area where water might get in. Excess that foams out of the joint can be easily cut off after it cures and with that in mind use it sparingly. A little bit goes a long way. Don’t get it on your skin because it turns black on skin.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Joel J's profile

Joel J

62 posts in 2947 days


#9 posted 01-17-2021 06:46 PM

Thanks guys for all the comments. I think the final solution for this project will be TB III as my joints are snug already. The epoxy product is interesting and if I had a little more room in the joints, would probably go in that direction.

-- Joel, Denver, CO

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