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milliput puty

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Forum topic by JTTHECLOCKMAN posted 01-14-2021 05:55 AM 386 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JTTHECLOCKMAN

284 posts in 4124 days


01-14-2021 05:55 AM

This is used in turning alot so will throw it out there. I am looking for a good source for the epoxy putty milliput puty in all colors from a reliable source and good prices. Thanks.

-- John T.


17 replies so far

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JTTHECLOCKMAN

284 posts in 4124 days


#1 posted 01-17-2021 05:25 AM

I guess no one here uses this???

-- John T.

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SMP

3192 posts in 879 days


#2 posted 01-17-2021 05:35 AM

I guess its not “used alot” in turning as you mentioned lol. I had to look it up, looks like that is a brand name of epoxy putty used in modelmaking, figurines etc. I mainly just turn wood, but i know some pen turners buy epoxy blanks etc. Maybe try a pen turners forum? Like penturners.org

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poopiekat

4856 posts in 4708 days


#3 posted 01-17-2021 05:40 AM

I had to order it from a source in Great Britain, for a project that is still on hold. It’s still in my lathe cabinet. Yes, hard to find in North America.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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JTTHECLOCKMAN

284 posts in 4124 days


#4 posted 01-17-2021 06:23 AM



I had to order it from a source in Great Britain, for a project that is still on hold. It s still in my lathe cabinet. Yes, hard to find in North America.

- poopiekat

It is funny you said that. I just placed an order from Great Britain too because it was the cheapest and I was able to get all colors at the same price. Rare over here. Thanks.

-- John T.

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JTTHECLOCKMAN

284 posts in 4124 days


#5 posted 01-17-2021 06:25 AM



I guess its not “used alot” in turning as you mentioned lol. I had to look it up, looks like that is a brand name of epoxy putty used in modelmaking, figurines etc. I mainly just turn wood, but i know some pen turners buy epoxy blanks etc. Maybe try a pen turners forum? Like penturners.org

- SMP

It is used in wood turning alot for decorative infills. I am a memeber on the IAP penturning forum and got one answer. They use a different type putty for pen blanks because the make all sorts of designs with it. As I mentioned below I just placed an order from Great Britain so see what happens. I believe that is where the stuff is made. Tough to find all colors here in the states. Thanks.

-- John T.

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poopiekat

4856 posts in 4708 days


#6 posted 01-17-2021 03:55 PM

I once wondered about using ‘Bondo’ auto body filler as an accent on ornamental turnings. Seems like it would tool easily on the lathe, but you’d be stuck with that one drab gray color. That is, if it didn’t fly off the lathe and knock some teeth out.

Why a comparable product is unavailable in North America is a mystery. I’ve cast an eye on “Durham’s Rock Hard Water Putty” as an ornamental filler, and I’m sure it could be colored with food coloring if necessary.

Might I suggest using acrylic resins as an adjunct to your turnings? It’s lots of fun and opens up a whole new dimension to your work.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Maro2Bear

28 posts in 7 days


#7 posted 01-17-2021 05:04 PM

Greetings. Ive used Milliput in several misc turning work. One project included adding in eyes to a snowman that i turned on the lathe. Another project, more decorative, included using milliput as inlaid bands. Worked perfectly.

As far as availability (and price) the maker/source is UK based. Ships quickly, but the price has really changed. Last year it was about $8.00 per tube – now, between $15 & $17 for the same basic black. Our local Hobby Lobby often has it, but only in white.

It’s an expensive product, but turns beautifully when used as an inlay. Lathe tools easily smooth, and sanding mskes it perfectly smooth. Accepts finishes well, including spray lacquer.

Sooo, if you want a variety of colors, you will have to buy it from the UK..

-- Mark B. Glenn Dale, MD

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JTTHECLOCKMAN

284 posts in 4124 days


#8 posted 01-17-2021 05:17 PM

Ah great to hear positive comments about this product. I have seen some projects that turners used this stuff including John Lucas and that is why I got interested. I did get the order in and will hopefully see for myself what this product is all about and it will sure be a help in decorating some turnings. I like the idea about eyes on a snowman. I plan on making a few ornaments in the snowman family so this can work for eyes and buttons and other things. Thanks all for the replys.

-- John T.

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Maro2Bear

28 posts in 7 days


#9 posted 01-17-2021 07:15 PM

Here is a tealight holder turned on the lathe. Wild Cherry with three bands of black Milliput.

-- Mark B. Glenn Dale, MD

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JTTHECLOCKMAN

284 posts in 4124 days


#10 posted 01-17-2021 07:49 PM



Here is a tealight holder turned on the lathe. Wild Cherry with three bands of black Milliput.

- Maro2Bear

That is sweet. I agree this stuff has its place and that makes some nice inlay. Thanks for showing.

-- John T.

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therealSteveN

7009 posts in 1548 days


#11 posted 01-17-2021 08:03 PM

My Wife has some she picked up at a basket making convention. It was supposedly going to hold loose pieces of cane, reed, wood down while you moved on with the weave. She thought you needed too much of it to work, to make it better than something simpler like super glue.

Poopiekat. I’ve been using Durhams Rock hard for well over 40 years, and it stains, paints, and colors well. It stays rock hard, but you can sand, or work it down like wood. Once I have inserted it into wood, and allowed it time to set, usually I go 24 hours, I’ve never had any come loose, with Bondo it cracked out about half the times I tried it. The hardest thing is mixing it to the wettish peanut butter consistency where it works best, and is a process of adding wither more powder, or water. Compared to wood fillers, it’s dirt cheap.

-- Think safe, be safe

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poopiekat

4856 posts in 4708 days


#12 posted 01-17-2021 08:13 PM


My Wife has some she picked up at a basket making convention. It was supposedly going to hold loose pieces of cane, reed, wood down while you moved on with the weave. She thought you needed too much of it to work, to make it better than something simpler like super glue.

Poopiekat. I ve been using Durhams Rock hard for well over 40 years, and it stains, paints, and colors well. It stays rock hard, but you can sand, or work it down like wood. Once I have inserted it into wood, and allowed it time to set, usually I go 24 hours, I ve never had any come loose, with Bondo it cracked out about half the times I tried it. The hardest thing is mixing it to the wettish peanut butter consistency where it works best, and is a process of adding wither more powder, or water. Compared to wood fillers, it s dirt cheap.

- therealSteveN

I’m glad this conversation got started! Maybe Lilliput will market their product in the US and beyond, or some enterprising company could license the product to be manufactured here.
Oddly, the lack of a source is what drove me to making lathe turnings with epoxy infill, and it’s hard to rein in my desire to make visually appealing items when I should be doing my custom casework. Now that I have a small package of Lilliput, it’s not enough to do the scope of creations I have imagined.
My first experience with Durham’s was with gaps in granite steps that widened due to frost. A woman’s spike heel got stuck in the gap, and she fell. I filled the gaps with Durham’s, the gaps were still tight 10 years later. Plus, I like how the cans have not changed the logo in 75 years.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Maro2Bear

28 posts in 7 days


#13 posted 01-17-2021 10:09 PM



My Wife has some she picked up at a basket making convention. It was supposedly going to hold loose pieces of cane, reed, wood down while you moved on with the weave. She thought you needed too much of it to work, to make it better than something simpler like super glue.

Poopiekat. I ve been using Durhams Rock hard for well over 40 years, and it stains, paints, and colors well. It stays rock hard, but you can sand, or work it down like wood. Once I have inserted it into wood, and allowed it time to set, usually I go 24 hours, I ve never had any come loose, with Bondo it cracked out about half the times I tried it. The hardest thing is mixing it to the wettish peanut butter consistency where it works best, and is a process of adding wither more powder, or water. Compared to wood fillers, it s dirt cheap.

- therealSteveN

Wow….i can’t imagine using Milliput as a “glue” to hold cane or reed. It’s just not sticky at all like an adhesive. It’s a two part epoxy-like substance, mixing equal parts of the milliput. Way too expensive to use like a glue.

I need to check out that Durhams Rock – especially if it is cheaper, available & in different colors.

-- Mark B. Glenn Dale, MD

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therealSteveN

7009 posts in 1548 days


#14 posted 01-18-2021 03:48 AM

I think the people selling the Millput at the show the Wife went to were trying to sell it as a do-everything. It was an international show, so probably that was how it got over here. For the application they were suggesting, it would work, but only with a huge wad of it, some clamping, and time. She uses thick cyanoacrylate and an accelerator, it’s done in seconds, and visibly makes no change.

poopiekat, I like the old time look of the product as well.

-- Think safe, be safe

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JamesVavra

305 posts in 4290 days


#15 posted 01-18-2021 03:22 PM

I use Apoxie Sculpt. It comes in fewer colors than milliput, but it is less expensive and has a much longer shelf life (I have some black apoxie sculpt on the shelf that was opened 4 years ago and is still good). I usually give it 24 hours to cure, and it turns/sands/polishes well.

https://www.amazon.com/Waterproof-Air-Clay-Sculpting-Repairs/dp/B005J03Q5W/

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