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Table saw blade burning?

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Forum topic by jason40 posted 01-12-2021 05:23 PM 500 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jason40

6 posts in 173 days


01-12-2021 05:23 PM

I had a question about table saw blade burning.

Most everything I have read says it is usually because you feed the wood too slowly. I purchased a new Forest Woodworker II blade. If I feed pine faster than it should be – it does not burn. Everything else does-(walnut, cherry, maple, purpleheart, etc). I cant feed it thru any faster and be safe or accurate.

Any ideas on possible causes ? We have a 1951 Delta Unisaw. Does the motor just not have enough power to cut thru hardwoods? Any help/ideas appreciated


19 replies so far

View DaveM123's profile

DaveM123

97 posts in 268 days


#1 posted 01-12-2021 05:28 PM

Sounds like you’re having trouble with hardwoods. My guess is that you are underpowered. Also, make sure your saw blade is aligned correctly.

-- Dave

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jason40

6 posts in 173 days


#2 posted 01-12-2021 05:57 PM

ok thank you – blade brand new out the box -actually tried 2 now – used miter gauges/pin gauge/electronic slot gauge/squares/etc to align blade to top of table and fence. Sitting at perfect 90 to top and fence

View SMP's profile

SMP

3192 posts in 879 days


#3 posted 01-12-2021 06:02 PM

Cherry tends to burn no matter what. One option if underpowered is try a thin kerf blade

View LesB's profile

LesB

2796 posts in 4417 days


#4 posted 01-12-2021 06:17 PM

Which specific Forest blade did you get…what thickness, number of teeth, designed for (?)...cross cut. rip cut, or multipurpose. A quick look showed about 10 different blades in the WoodWorker II category.
What is the hp of your motor?

If you got a cross cut blade and are trying to rip with it it will burn. The combination blade would be OK if you have a strong enough motor. As mentioned by Dave a thinner blade might help because it is removing less wood and therefore needs less power. A thinner blade can distort a little under pressure but it not normally a problem.

-- Les B, Oregon

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1721 posts in 2610 days


#5 posted 01-12-2021 06:25 PM

I had that same issue and I switched to a thin kerf rip blade. That made a big difference in eliminating burning.
I use this one.

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

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jason40

6 posts in 173 days


#6 posted 01-12-2021 06:25 PM

original blade tried was the Woodworker II Thin kerf 3/32”- 40 teeth (table saw-rip and crosscut). Also tried with and without stabilizers – 1 on each side of blade, 1 on both side of blade. Also tried same blade, regular kerf. 1951 Unisaw comes with a 1hp motor. maybe replace motor with a Leeson 2 or 3hp version ? Or as suggested by fivecodys – just switch to dedicated rip blade

View xedos's profile

xedos

183 posts in 274 days


#7 posted 01-12-2021 06:49 PM

a 51’ motor has probably lost some of its ponies along the way.

Concur on a dedicated rip blade , specially in this situation. You don’t mention the thickness of the wood you’re cutting (or I missed it). 1 hp or less is gonna struggle in 8/4 or thicker especially with 40 teeth.

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jason40

6 posts in 173 days


#8 posted 01-12-2021 07:28 PM

usually only 3/4 ” thick – was cutting down boards for christmas presents, bed frames, cabinet face frames, etc

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

4389 posts in 2196 days


#9 posted 01-12-2021 08:13 PM

Are your teeth clean on the sides? I find pine can really lay the pitch onto the blade which lies in wait until something harder comes by.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4006 posts in 2468 days


#10 posted 01-12-2021 08:34 PM

+1 Try another blade?
Personally, Never achieved great results rip cutting with thin kerf Forest WWII on my 1.5HP contractor saw. Worked perfect with cross cuts, and OK with plywood; but was horrible rip blade. After using the same blade on 3HP Unisaw, it works much better, but still does not rip cut without burning, unless feed rate is really fast.

How high above your wood is blade height set?
Different blade heights, will change the cutting angles, and cut improve/degrade cut quality. Most TS blades are designed for specific cutting thickness range, and setting ~1/8” above the lumber.

What kind of motor do you have?
Original 1HP RI motor, or newer 1HP induction motor?

The older 1HP RI has same peak torque as 2.5HP induction motor, just like a 2.5HP router that only has motor with 1HP electrical rating. Properly maintained these motors are a beast. But they do require periodic maintenance. Have you checked the brushes lately? Does the saw make any loud noises, meaning the arbor or motor bearings need replaced. Unisaw makes a very quiet whine when turned on, are easy to talk over, and they are never loud; unless bearings/belts need replacement.

Your previous posts are leaving out details to show everything is set up properly,
Could be lazy posting style, could be missing something?
Never hurts to get back to basics and work on subtle details.

1) Set blade 90° to table top with digital angle gauge.

2) Align blade to miter slot.
Should be 0.001” or less difference front and back of blade, measured on same tooth.

3) Align fence to miter slot.
Should be 0.000 front and back of blade. Some folks prefer having the fence on back side of blade toed out 0.001”

4) Make a test cut:
Run a piece of hardwood through the blade and turn off saw power half way through.
(Don’t be klutz, never let go of the board)

Where is the wood burning: middle of cut or back edge of cut?
Middle of cut = cutting to slow, wrong blade for cut with available HP
Back of cut = alignment issue, or cutting to slow, wrong blade for job, and/or not enough HP
If only burned on back of cut, open up back side of fence 0.001-0.002”, and try again.

IMHO – Even with prefect alignment, with only 1HP TS, need use the right blade for each cut; and preferably thin kerf blades. Rip blade for ripping, cross cut blade for cross cut, and plywood blade for man made materials. Don’t forget often need different TPI for different wood thickness to achieve best edge quality.
There is a lot science to TS blades.
The concept that one blade does every thing well is marketing department joke.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1623 posts in 575 days


#11 posted 01-12-2021 10:24 PM

I was watching a YouTube this morning on Forest Blades taken at a woodcraft and the Forest rep was saying after a safety disclaimer. A blade raised well above the work will run X number of degrees cooler. Overall it was a good video for blade selection and height. Found it

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7009 posts in 1548 days


#12 posted 01-12-2021 11:32 PM

If there is a saw that screams use a dedicated rip blade, it’s a one HP Uni. Blade will be best if it’s plenty sharp too, and Bruce made a killer point about it being clean of pitch if you are sawing borg wood.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

925 posts in 360 days


#13 posted 01-13-2021 12:24 AM

A 7 1/4” Diablo thin kerf (.060”) with a splitter inset into your zero clearance insert may help as long as your hard wood is 4/4 or thinner. It’s worked very well for me for many years on a 2 HP contractor saw. Slower RPMs, but easier on your 1 HP motor and cheap too. Or replace the motor!

-- Darrel

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1357 posts in 1153 days


#14 posted 01-13-2021 12:55 AM



A 7 1/4” Diablo thin kerf (.060”) with a splitter inset into your zero clearance insert may help as long as your hard wood is 4/4 or thinner. It s worked very well for me for many years on a 2 HP contractor saw. Slower RPMs, but easier on your 1 HP motor and cheap too. Or replace the motor!

- Foghorn

I use a 7.25 40t dewalt blade with excellent results. Even with burn prone woods. The downside is they don’t last very long, sharpness wise. I have tried a ton of different 7.25” blades. Haven’t found anything better than the dewalt for the price.

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Foghorn

925 posts in 360 days


#15 posted 01-13-2021 01:32 AM


A 7 1/4” Diablo thin kerf (.060”) with a splitter inset into your zero clearance insert may help as long as your hard wood is 4/4 or thinner. It s worked very well for me for many years on a 2 HP contractor saw. Slower RPMs, but easier on your 1 HP motor and cheap too. Or replace the motor!

- Foghorn

I use a 7.25 40t dewalt blade with excellent results. Even with burn prone woods. The downside is they don’t last very long, sharpness wise. I have tried a ton of different 7.25” blades. Haven’t found anything better than the dewalt for the price.

- CWWoodworking


Haven’t tried the Dewalt but the Diablos seem to retain their sharpness as well as any other carbide blades I have although I’m definitely not producing things beyond a hobbiest volume.

-- Darrel

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