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Best way to get 3/4" boards from thicker stock

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Forum topic by AGolden posted 01-12-2021 06:07 AM 479 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AGolden

93 posts in 308 days


01-12-2021 06:07 AM

Hey all,

I use mostly hand tools (i.e. no thickness planer) and I am trying to work out the best way to get 3/4” boards from the selection of wood I get from the lumber yard (4/4, 5/4, 6/4, 8/4 etc.) I do have a bandsaw that I can resaw with.

My current strategy would be to resaw 8/4 into two “fat” 3/4” boards and plane off the bandsaw marks. I am not sure if this is the most efficient use of material but I am worried if I tried this with 6/4 than I would get two boards that end up thinner than 3/4”

If you really want to get philosophical than we can ask if it really matters if they end up a little thinner than 3/4” for most applications. Just depends on how much thinner they get.


11 replies so far

View KYtoolsmith's profile

KYtoolsmith

203 posts in 834 days


#1 posted 01-12-2021 07:56 AM

Is there a reason you must have 3/4 stock? If you have 4/4 material from the sawmill, planing to flatten and remove the mill marks will get you to 7/8” thickness very quickly. I do this on many projects. Very little of my work uses an exact thickness. I design with this in mind. My dining room table is from 4/4 material, with the finished thickness 7/8…
Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

261 posts in 2009 days


#2 posted 01-12-2021 10:19 AM

Unless 8/4 is cheaper than 4/4 I don’t see the advantage in resawing then planing down, you could just plane down the 4/4 instead?

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View drsurfrat's profile

drsurfrat

391 posts in 161 days


#3 posted 01-12-2021 11:06 AM

^ yep
Might as well buy close to what you want to begin with. Take advantage of the work already done. And in some retailers, (much) thicker boards are actually more expensive per board foot.

I don’t have a thickness planer or big enough bandsaw, so I resaw by hand. Therefore I only do it when I want book matched panels.

-- Mike (near Boston) ... Laziness is the mother of invention, necessity is the mother of exhaustion - me

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1145 posts in 2623 days


#4 posted 01-12-2021 01:16 PM

I was disappointed in now much I had to plane some 4/4 stock for my last project. Wound up less than 3/4.

View PBWilson1970's profile

PBWilson1970

170 posts in 368 days


#5 posted 01-12-2021 01:58 PM

I’ve been in the same boat as tvrgeek and have had to plane boards to less than I would have wanted due to movement after acclimating to my shop or when I resawed thicker stock. Good luck with your milling! Hopefully your wood will cooperate when it’s planed to the thickness you want.

-- I love the smell of sawdust in the morning.

View AGolden's profile

AGolden

93 posts in 308 days


#6 posted 01-12-2021 03:09 PM



Unless 8/4 is cheaper than 4/4 I don t see the advantage in resawing then planing down, you could just plane down the 4/4 instead?

- MikeB_UK

My worry was that 4/4 would look a little “thick” for this design, however, based on what I am seeing here and the fact that the above is probably the case it looks like it would probably be better to use 4/4 and pursue another strategy like profiling the edge to lighten it up.

View BigMig's profile

BigMig

554 posts in 3587 days


#7 posted 01-12-2021 03:17 PM

Can you ask the lumberyard to joint/plane the stock you buy from them?

-- Mike from Lansdowne, PA

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

6363 posts in 2361 days


#8 posted 01-12-2021 03:40 PM

By the time that you scrub/flatten and smooth both sides of 4/4, you may be pretty close to 3/4 anyway.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

4389 posts in 2196 days


#9 posted 01-12-2021 03:55 PM

My wood sources have both rough and surfaced two sides available usually. The rough (4/4) is generally a tad over 1” and the s2s is usually about 7/8”. I’ve been there with the < 3/4” after removing the warps and defects, but if you can choose carefully adn get a feel for how each wood type will move, you can often select boards that will behave as-is and only require a light removal of mill marks.

Resawing works well of course, but that is when wood will tend to warp from the tension being relaeased. This often makes me resaw “thick” and leave material for correcting. At that point I waste more then I intended to “save”

View SMP's profile

SMP

3192 posts in 879 days


#10 posted 01-12-2021 04:42 PM


My worry was that 4/4 would look a little “thick” for this design, however, based on what I am seeing here and the fact that the above is probably the case it looks like it would probably be better to use 4/4 and pursue another strategy like profiling the edge to lighten it up.

- AGolden

Yep, if you look at antiques, you see things like an underbevel on a table top to lighten the look of the edge while maintaining a flat top. Only takes a few minutes with a sharp plane. You can use a marking gauge or even pull a Paul Sellers and just use your finger and pencil to eyeball it.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

25737 posts in 4079 days


#11 posted 01-12-2021 04:57 PM

I’m with Bruce, resawing will cause the boards to warp when the tension is released in them…especially pine . If you have full 1” boards and want to take them to 3/4”, it would be best to find someone with a planer and do them that way. They might take some hand planing to start if they don’t sit flat on a table before sending then through.

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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