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Spoke Shaves and such

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Forum topic by GrumpyGolfGuy posted 01-12-2021 12:19 AM 581 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GrumpyGolfGuy

107 posts in 304 days


01-12-2021 12:19 AM

Topic tags/keywords: shaping plane

As I continue my transition away from power toward hand tools I’m looking to add spoke shaves to my hand plane inventory. My question is where do I start? I see the Stanley’s are numbered, and each has many blades. Do I find an old Stanley to start and if so what number and what blades?

I’m just looking to start out by being able to round over edges and such.

Chris


12 replies so far

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SMP

3429 posts in 914 days


#1 posted 01-12-2021 12:25 AM

I think the most versatile for the money is the Stanley or Record 151. It has two fine tune adjusters, one trick you can do with this is angle it a bit, so you can get thicker or finer shavings just by moving it to one side or the other. Go with flat bottom for general purpose

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BurlyBob

8482 posts in 3274 days


#2 posted 01-12-2021 01:32 AM

I’ve got to agree with SMP. I use my 151 more than any of the other spoke shaves in my arsenal.

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pottz

14799 posts in 1993 days


#3 posted 01-12-2021 01:54 AM

well if money is not an issue ill recommend the veritas,they are like carving butter.and they are just plain beautiful too look at-lol.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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SMP

3429 posts in 914 days


#4 posted 01-12-2021 01:57 AM



well if money is not an issue ill recommend the veritas,they are like carving butter.and they are just plain beautiful too look at-lol.

- pottz

Yeah money no issue I would probably get a Lie Nielse Boggs model, those things are like works of art.

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BillGo

120 posts in 142 days


#5 posted 01-12-2021 02:09 AM

I have just started trying to learn to use a spoke shave as well. I was trying to make a handle, and I am having trouble clamping in a way where I can work on several sides of the handle. Do you veteran spoke shavers have a favorite way to clamp when you work?

-- Bill - in New Hampshire

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SMP

3429 posts in 914 days


#6 posted 01-12-2021 02:22 AM


I have just started trying to learn to use a spoke shave as well. I was trying to make a handle, and I am having trouble clamping in a way where I can work on several sides of the handle. Do you veteran spoke shavers have a favorite way to clamp when you work?

- BillGo

Well depends, if I know i can make it longer and cut to size(like a handle) I’ll jest leave a couple inches on one end to clamp. Then mount like so in my vise:

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7235 posts in 1582 days


#7 posted 01-12-2021 02:33 AM



I have just started trying to learn to use a spoke shave as well. I was trying to make a handle, and I am having trouble clamping in a way where I can work on several sides of the handle. Do you veteran spoke shavers have a favorite way to clamp when you work?

- BillGo

Everyone’s methods are different, but for me a draw horse/shaving horse is the best way to clamp when using either a draw knife, or a spokeshave.

-- Think safe, be safe

View drsurfrat's profile

drsurfrat

476 posts in 195 days


#8 posted 01-12-2021 02:41 AM

Chris, start with any spokeshave. There are lots of variations, but the essentials come down to two types, flat sole and curved sole. Find one with a flat sole. They can all be sharpened and can all be adjusted.

I have a spare Goodell and Pratt that I found not too long ago. See
https://www.lumberjocks.com/topics/64776
entry #223
Kenny says it’s made no later than 1915, kinda cool and in very good shape.

Also, find a drawknife. I use it more than my spokeshave.

-- Mike (near Boston) ... Laziness is the mother of invention, necessity is the mother of exhaustion - me

View Bearcontrare's profile

Bearcontrare

91 posts in 145 days


#9 posted 01-15-2021 02:08 PM

Gentlemen, A gentle reminder may be in order. First Rule of Hand Tools: Always work from the rougher tool to the finer one. A drawknife is a MUST have, for doing the basic shaping. That shape is then refined with the spokeshave.
Use of both tools is happily intuitive, and takes very little practice to achieve satisfactory results. Cuts can be made either deeper or more shallow simply by adjusting the angle of one’s wrists, which changes the blade angle.
A flat bottomed spokeshave is the go to tool for most projects, and the best one to use at the start. Clamp up some scrap wood in the vise and let the shavings start flying! These two tools are joyous to use!

-- Barry, in Maryland

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MikeB_UK

288 posts in 2043 days


#10 posted 01-15-2021 04:28 PM

drsurfrat beat me to it, Get a flat soled one first.

Don’t get a cheap knockoff one – they can be made to work, but not if you don’t know what you are doing.
A spokeshave is one of those tools where if you get a dodgy one first it will put you off for life :)

So, either vintage or decent new (Veritas, LN, Woodriver).

Clamping mostly depends on personal preference.
A shave horse would be the ideal solution, though pretty much anything that holds the stock will work fine.
I often use a parallel clamp in a vice as most versatile to put at any angle, kind of a poor mans carving vice.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1256 posts in 919 days


#11 posted 01-16-2021 06:07 AM

Woodshop Therapy put out a video (April 10,2020) on building a Benchtop Shaving Horse. Seemed like a good clamping method. Use it with a spokeshave or with a draw knife. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qz09xpYA6g8 video instructions to build it. clamp to work bench and away you go.

I went with the Kunz flat and round bottom spokeshaves. The flat bottom I used on several of my projects and works good for me. The round bottom I haven’t had a project to use it on yet. The Kunz radius and half round spokeshaves I do plan on getting (I’ve had the need for them recently). https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/kunz-hand-planes.aspx

You may want to add a Travisher to your list of hand tools. Great for shaping seats. https://www.pinterest.co.uk/martinpleiss/spokeshaves-scraper-travishers/#travisher

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Bearcontrare

91 posts in 145 days


#12 posted 01-18-2021 10:27 PM

Pretty nice gizmo that guy’s made himself. Had forgotten that I’d seen a few bench mounted shave horses on YouTube a few years ago. Nice twist on an old tool, especially in a limited space.

-- Barry, in Maryland

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