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Rolling work station w/table saw

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Forum topic by OzarkSawdust posted 01-04-2021 07:32 PM 590 views 1 time favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OzarkSawdust

68 posts in 772 days


01-04-2021 07:32 PM

Has anyone built and use a work station like this? If so I would like to see a picture and know how you like the setup.

I’m thinking about upgrading my Kobalt Jobsite saw and maybe adding a jointer and planer. I’ve seen a neat design for a rolling table the jointer/planer would sit on…and a place in the shop to park it out of the way.

But looking around if I add that…and a contractor saw…and my present router table…and my rolling 24” x 36” work table…etc. I’m getting crowded real fast! If I were to build something like the photo I could incorporate a table saw, router table, down draft sanding area, assembly area, storage drawers and shelves, maybe even a flip up DeWalt oscillating sander. You get the idea. And roll it around when needed.

My shop is a 18’ x 30” metal building with 9’ walls. I have a 9’ roll up door on the end and a walk through door on one side.


17 replies so far

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BlasterStumps

1904 posts in 1413 days


#1 posted 01-04-2021 10:42 PM

I like that table a lot. I have thought about one for a while now. I found a small table saw that I would like to have in a table like that.

Looking at the above picture, I am wondering what duct collection was built in?

I see a middle caster. If I was to build a cart like that, it would be with a torsion box frame with casters on the four corners.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." MIke in CO

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OzarkSawdust

68 posts in 772 days


#2 posted 01-04-2021 11:07 PM



I like that table a lot. I have thought about one for a while now. I found a small table saw that I would like to have in a table like that.

Looking at the above picture, I am wondering what duct collection was built in?

I see a middle caster. If I was to build a cart like that, it would be with a torsion box frame with casters on the four corners.

- BlasterStumps

That’s kind of what I thought. There are a ton of them on You Tube and Pinterest. Also google it and look at photos. Everything from just a little bigger than the saw to 4’ x 8’ sheet size! I like the idea of a lot of the things I’ll need being centralized. And a ton of storage for the smaller things that are all over the shop! Maybe I could fine something without spending a half hour looking over the entire shop!

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Jimarco

39 posts in 2081 days


#3 posted 01-05-2021 12:43 AM

I had a portable when I had a small shop (shed) that I would roll outside so it wasn’t like the one in the picture you posted. Knowing the size of your shop and what you are wanting to add it sounds good to me. My suggestion is to built it like the picture with the router table on the right, table saw in the middle but on the left of the table saw I would try to make it a sanding down draft area. For your planer and jointer I would put each one on there own separate small table where their outfeed side is the same height as the height of the big table so you can use it as an extension plus if you did add the jointer and planer to the big table it would be too heavy in my opinion. show us some pictures when your done.

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OzarkSawdust

68 posts in 772 days


#4 posted 01-05-2021 01:29 AM

This is kind of what I’m wanting for planer/jointer. I saw a design like this that had a Dust Deputy, vac. and bucket in the stand. The planer was higher than the jointer.

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Madmark2

2080 posts in 1562 days


#5 posted 01-05-2021 01:57 AM

That planer / jointer cart makes my back ache just looking at it. The work height of your tools should be the same to avoid lifting/stooping.

Building a giant all in one workstation seems like a great idea but … If everything is built in one aircraft carrier sized workstation it becomes unwieldy in a one man shop. Something that large will need a level surface. If you have any humps to go over it’ll catch. Also think about having to plumb the dust collection inside a big box.

The design you show includes an outfeed table but in a small, tight shop a roller stand may work as well and it folds when not in use,

Individual mobile stations allow you flexibility in your shop layout. You can pack everything tight and roll out just the tools you need. You can individualize each tools height for uniformity and avoid having to grunt interchangeable tools.

If you have a dedicated space, how often do you really have to move all that?

Your shop, build as you see fit. In my shop everything is modular, has a common work height, and is mobile (or at least gruntable). I have an 8×16 (1/2 garage) space with everything in close proximity and only need to shift the planer out for long stock. Everything else pretty much stays put even if it has wheels.

PS: In that example pic the guy built that fancy top etc but doesn’t bother to put a ZCI on the saw. Just say’in.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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woodbutcherbynight

7289 posts in 3383 days


#6 posted 01-05-2021 02:40 AM

Yes, works great and lots of storage.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Tony1212

491 posts in 2708 days


#7 posted 01-05-2021 02:07 PM

I built one for my Craftsman contractor saw. I love it.

The router table area has storage for bits (right side of door), other routers (two drawers below door), chisels/sharpening (left of door – workbench is directly opposite of router area), PPE (bottom right drawer) and drop cloths (bottom left drawer)

I’m able to store my saw fence and the auxiliary router fence in the shelves just past the router area. Also stored in that area: box of layout tools, box of glue up tools, box of featherboards and a scroll saw at the bottom.

Directly under the saw is a drawer for extra saw blades, blade changing tools, and extra throat plates.

Bottom drawer is for my circular saw, jig saw and circular saw size chop saw.

From the back you can see i have dust collection for the saw and the jointer at the far end. As well as more storage space (mainly miscellaneous stuff).

I’ve been using this for at least 5 years now. It has 6 heavy duty locking casters on the bottom. I never use the locking function though. Trying to move the thing reminds me of the blocking sled during football practice in high school. Get as low as possible and pump the feet, eventually it gets moving.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

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OzarkSawdust

68 posts in 772 days


#8 posted 01-05-2021 02:47 PM

Both you guys have great looking rigs! And 5 tons of storage for most everything you need.

What fences are you guys using? If you were building it now would you pick the same fence?

If you were going to build a new setup today, what would you do different? What table saw would you use?

Thank you everyone! Some good info so far! Keep it coming.

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OzarkSawdust

68 posts in 772 days


#9 posted 01-05-2021 06:20 PM



That planer / jointer cart makes my back ache just looking at it. The work height of your tools should be the same to avoid lifting/stooping.

Building a giant all in one workstation seems like a great idea but … If everything is built in one aircraft carrier sized workstation it becomes unwieldy in a one man shop. Something that large will need a level surface. If you have any humps to go over it ll catch. Also think about having to plumb the dust collection inside a big box.

The design you show includes an outfeed table but in a small, tight shop a roller stand may work as well and it folds when not in use,

Individual mobile stations allow you flexibility in your shop layout. You can pack everything tight and roll out just the tools you need. You can individualize each tools height for uniformity and avoid having to grunt interchangeable tools.

If you have a dedicated space, how often do you really have to move all that?

Your shop, build as you see fit. In my shop everything is modular, has a common work height, and is mobile (or at least gruntable). I have an 8×16 (1/2 garage) space with everything in close proximity and only need to shift the planer out for long stock. Everything else pretty much stays put even if it has wheels.

PS: In that example pic the guy built that fancy top etc but doesn t bother to put a ZCI on the saw. Just say in.

- Madmark2

Interesting ideas. So you’re saying instead of an aircraft carrier setup…maybe a destroyer and a few PT boats might be easier to use and move around :) And by setting all of them up at the same level, working surface of the tool mounted on it, you could use the largest as an outfeed table when needed…?

Roaming through the forum I found something that Lockwatcher published in 2011 that might be the kind of thing you’re talking about…right?
https://www.lumberjocks.com/Lockwatcher/blog/20526 and associated comments.

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Madmark2

2080 posts in 1562 days


#10 posted 01-05-2021 09:47 PM

Yepper. And has been mentioned pushing the big combo is a grunt even with 6 casters.

Individual stations give storage space for the tools accessories and supplies. If you only need your, say OSS, on a job you only have to hump the one item and all of the bits & bobs automatically come with.

Ditto if its just a shop reorg. The giant all-in-one will only fit a few ways whereas you can rotate tools in and out individually as your needs change.

I’m a one legged woodworker and keeping tool surfaces even helps. The drill press acts as a catch for the chop saw, etc.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Bstrom

262 posts in 147 days


#11 posted 01-06-2021 04:00 AM

FWIW – this is my cantered router station with dust control – compact to fit into its little storage space.

-- Bstrom

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woodbutcherbynight

7289 posts in 3383 days


#12 posted 01-06-2021 05:19 AM


Interesting ideas. So you re saying instead of an aircraft carrier setup…maybe a destroyer and a few PT boats might be easier to use and move around :) And by setting all of them up at the same level, working surface of the tool mounted on it, you could use the largest as an outfeed table when needed…?

Roaming through the forum I found something that Lockwatcher published in 2011 that might be the kind of thing you re talking about…right?
https://www.lumberjocks.com/Lockwatcher/blog/20526 and associated comments.

- OzarkSawdust

First there is no right way or wrong way to set up YOUR own personal shop. I like that madmark pointed out that having a large assembled table with tools on it is heavy, and difficult to change set ups. He is spot on, it indeed is. Mine has not moved since being set in place and filled up. He also has one leg missing so this would be a huge issue for him. That’s smart because hey we have to work around getting older, injuries and so on. I myself have pins in my right wrist and arm that limit my mobility and capability.

To a new woodworker starting out it is difficult to make suggestions on what will work well for them. Each of us designs our work space as our experience and particular specialty (if we have one, I don’t) dictates. My set up was designed on paper during my 3 years in Iraq. Many different designs were drawn up, and amended. Even with that it took 5 1/2 months to build it.

My suggestion for you is to analyze how you work now, how it can be improved if x tool was put next to y tool, and then lastly how difficult will it be to adapt it as you progress in skill and tooling.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Tony1212

491 posts in 2708 days


#13 posted 01-06-2021 02:26 PM



Both you guys have great looking rigs! And 5 tons of storage for most everything you need.

What fences are you guys using? If you were building it now would you pick the same fence?

If you were going to build a new setup today, what would you do different? What table saw would you use?

Thank you everyone! Some good info so far! Keep it coming.

- OzarkSawdust

I inherited all of my big tools from my grandfather. So the tablesaw is a 1950’s Craftsman contractor saw that are quite good, but have notoriously bad fences. I put a Vega Pro 40, meaning it has 40” to the right of the blade. I figured I would put my router bit 38” from the blade so I could use the fence with the router table as well.

My grandfather had the jointer mounted to the left of the saw on a homemade steel frame. I liked it and kept it there with the new workstation. And I wanted something to cover the motor at the back of the contractor saw.

Between the jointer, saw motor, and fence capacity/router table, that gave me the final dimensions.

The Vega fence is much better than the crappy fence my grandfather used, but I would go with a Biesmeyer style fence if I were to do it again. The Vega uses a circular tube as the track and has a tendency to rack a bit as I move it, then straighten out when I lock it down. So it takes a couple tries to get it exactly where I want it. From what I’ve seen, the Biesmeyer fences with the square tracks aren’t as loose and barely move when locking them down.

My Craftsman saw cannot not do reliable dadoes/rabbets. It does not height lock and tends to drop a bit when cutting dadoes. I’ve been interested in getting a real cabinet saw with a height lock and better dust collection, but then I’d have to pull that workstation apart and figure out where to put everything.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

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OzarkSawdust

68 posts in 772 days


#14 posted 01-06-2021 03:10 PM


FWIW – this is my cantered router station with dust control – compact to fit into its little storage space.

- Bstrom

Nice setup. I have a Rockler router tabletop and was thinking about putting wheels on it or rebuilding it in the “Lockwatcher style” with wheels.

Is that a DeWalt 734 planer on a cart in the background? If so how do you like it? I’m also looking at planers and jointers.

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OzarkSawdust

68 posts in 772 days


#15 posted 01-08-2021 01:06 AM

These photos show most all of my shop. Although I don’t know why some photos roll 90* when posted here, or how to correct it.

1. Shows my main work benches and scroll saw setup where I do 95% of my woodworking. With the new equipment I’ll be doing other projects, but still a lot on the scroll saw.

2. Shows my folding Kobalt table saw, wood rack in the corner (on wheels) and some boxes that can go away. New air cleaner is up high on the left. The DeWalt sliding miter saw is on a Delta folding stand and can be moved very easy.

3. Shows the back half of the shop. Storage racks on right side and back, 2 dust collectors (both on wheels), behind the patio heater there is a router table which can be rebuilt or wheels added to it, and a 2’ x 3’ rolling assembly table. The boat is half the size of the one I just sold, about 5”W X 15’L, and will live in here for the winter. If I sell the 2 recumbent trikes behind it the boat will go 3’ or more back in the corner.

So most everything in the center is on wheels now or easily moveable. I would like to keep it that way.
I’m 6’ tall. approx. what height is best for the working surface of table saw, assembly table, decks on planers & jointers, etc. you get what I’m asking?

Maybe this added info will make it more clear on setting up a shop to move into other projects, like hope chest and things.

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