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Coping Quarter Round Help Please

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Forum topic by Bobby870 posted 12-28-2020 01:48 PM 1026 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bobby870

3 posts in 265 days


12-28-2020 01:48 PM

I am working on installing quarter round and can’t figure out why my inside corners are looking like this. The joint is tight but the coped 45 piece never meets with the back end of the butt joint. Should the very top of the cope be at the back end of the other trim piece or will it always be like this and not go all the way to the back of the other trim piece?


11 replies so far

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1395 posts in 2312 days


#1 posted 12-28-2020 03:12 PM

Did you intend to post a photo? It’s hard to answer without it.

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

670 posts in 2244 days


#2 posted 12-28-2020 09:46 PM

Hi Bobby

I think you need at least 5 posts before you can add a pic, so you probably need to describe it more or make more posts.

Inside joint should look like this.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View Bobby870's profile

Bobby870

3 posts in 265 days


#3 posted 12-29-2020 12:16 AM

I think I figured it out after many trials and changing the angle I was coping the trim at. Attached is a picture of what I kept getting where the joint was not going all the way back. I realized that when I got towards the bottom of the trim piece when I was coping it, I wasn’t back cutting it enough at the bottom, my cut was getting almost vertocle only. When I changed that angle at the bottom of the back cut, I now have the coped joint all the way to the back of the other joint.

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Bobby870

3 posts in 265 days


#4 posted 12-29-2020 12:22 AM

Here is the correct joint after I changed the angle of backcut.

View Jopldangla's profile

Jopldangla

53 posts in 338 days


#5 posted 12-29-2020 12:29 AM

Is it me… or does anybody else find it is easier to cope with a slightly dulled blade?

View bmerrill's profile

bmerrill

127 posts in 1282 days


#6 posted 12-29-2020 02:16 PM

For small quarter round consider using a Dremel with the sanding drum.
First cut a 45 on the piece to be coped, then sand along the cut line at 90° to the long edge of the molding.
Once the material is removed angle slightly to do a back cut.

-- Woodworking, the transformation of nature to culture.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

3051 posts in 1797 days


#7 posted 12-29-2020 05:09 PM

Don’t obsess. Once you put a coat of paint on it no one will notice. After all it is toe molding, not exactly at eye level.

Once you’ve coped the piece, back cut with a pocket knife to perfect the fit.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

8612 posts in 1783 days


#8 posted 12-29-2020 06:12 PM

Thing about Cope cuts is, if you do them all the time, it’s a muscle memory thing.

If you don’t do them all the time, but want them to be flawless without a lot of fooling around, you buy an Easy Coper.

http://www.easycoper.com/crown_molding_coping_jig.htm

-- Think safe, be safe

View 1thumb's profile

1thumb

501 posts in 3365 days


#9 posted 01-18-2021 02:59 PM

I cope w/Bosch barrell grip jigsaw an their scroll blades. Not for stain grade but fine for paint. An/or I’ll cut inside corners on a 44- degree, outside on a 46

-- “Some say it's just a part of it. We've got to fulfill the book.”

View theart's profile

theart

233 posts in 1763 days


#10 posted 01-18-2021 04:47 PM



Don t obsess. Once you put a coat of paint on it no one will notice. After all it is toe molding, not exactly at eye level.

Once you ve coped the piece, back cut with a pocket knife to perfect the fit.

- Madmark2

I use a dowel wrapped with sandpaper.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

9293 posts in 3475 days


#11 posted 01-19-2021 07:26 AM

Use some Timber mate wood putty in there. leave it for 20 minutes, wipe of the excess with a wet cloth, paint over it and no worries!

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