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Forum topic by lengal posted 12-18-2020 10:09 PM 632 views 0 times favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lengal

23 posts in 36 days


12-18-2020 10:09 PM

I will start by saying that I am not a woodworker or carpenter. I am a retired welder.

I am building a twin size platform base with drawers copying the platform base from a Jon Peters video. The video was about 30 minutes long and well done. After drawing up my plans, I got right to the build. After each days work, I would go look at his video again to keep me on track and found that he also has a few shorter breakdown video’s of each section of his build. This is where I need the help. On Jon’s short drawers video, he says he will apply 2 coats of polyurethane to the inside where the drawers will go. That was not mentioned in the long video. My platform box is 37 1/2” deep by 9 1/2 high and put together with screws and glue. I don’t see myself being able to apply the poly, sand it and apply a second coat.

So my question is, do I really need to protect the wood with anything or can I leave it bare? It is going in a bedroom. The drawer fronts and the poplar face will be painted and I can protect the outside of the platform so, I’m really only concerned about the inside where the drawers go. Not sure what to do at this point.

Any information will be greatly appreciated.

PS. Its cold here in Philly and my garage is not heated. Drying concerns also!!!

Don’t know why the picture came up sideways


36 replies so far

View Sycamoray's profile

Sycamoray

49 posts in 212 days


#1 posted 12-18-2020 10:20 PM

I never finish the inside of a project with polyurethane. In an enclosed space like behind a drawer, or in a drawer for that matter, the volatiles take seemingly forever to gas off, and the finish effectively contaminates whatever is in the space. The rare times I need to finish the inside of something, I use shellac.

Go ahead and paint the exteriors, etc. and move on with your life.

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SMP

3187 posts in 877 days


#2 posted 12-18-2020 10:52 PM

I have never really finished the inside of anything except cabinets where you see the inside, and drawer boxes. But lately I have just been buying the pre-finished baltic birch for drawer sides. If I am not going to see it again, it doesn’t usually get finished.

View HowardAppel's profile

HowardAppel

33 posts in 4006 days


#3 posted 12-19-2020 01:26 AM

I haven’t seen the specific videos to which you refer, but I know that Jon sometimes uses prefinished plywood and sometimes uses a sprayer. Having said that, I doubt that not finishing the inside will make a huge difference.

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lengal

23 posts in 36 days


#4 posted 12-19-2020 01:37 AM

Thanks for the replies. I’m happy to hear that I can go without finishing the inside. I’ll get back on it tomorrow


I haven t seen the specific videos to which you refer, but I know that Jon sometimes uses prefinished plywood and sometimes uses a sprayer. Having said that, I doubt that not finishing the inside will make a huge difference.

- HowardAppel

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vsy7leNPvZI

View lengal's profile

lengal

23 posts in 36 days


#5 posted 12-19-2020 01:38 AM



I haven t seen the specific videos to which you refer, but I know that Jon sometimes uses prefinished plywood and sometimes uses a sprayer. Having said that, I doubt that not finishing the inside will make a huge difference.

- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vsy7leNPvZI


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DrTebi

402 posts in 4239 days


#6 posted 12-19-2020 06:35 AM



I never finish the inside of a project with polyurethane. In an enclosed space like behind a drawer, or in a drawer for that matter, the volatiles take seemingly forever to gas off, and the finish effectively contaminates whatever is in the space. The rare times I need to finish the inside of something, I use shellac.

Go ahead and paint the exteriors, etc. and move on with your life.

- Sycamoray


I completely agree with what Sycamoray said above.

One thing to note however is, if I looked at the right video, that the drawers are not having any runners. If that is so, I would suggest to put a good amount of paste wax on the bottom of the interior (where the drawers ride on), and on the drawer bottom edges as well. This will make a hell of a difference in how nice they will glide…

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Madmark2

2067 posts in 1560 days


#7 posted 12-19-2020 06:42 AM

I use Johnson’s paste wax as a shop finish on most everything. It can be easily stripped and replaced with any finish if required. Wax doesn’t need sanding between coats and two slatherings will give a decent finish that dries quick, doesn’t outgas (much) and looks and feels better than plain wood.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2219 posts in 3765 days


#8 posted 12-19-2020 11:30 AM

I use the drawer glide tape from Woodcraft in place of wax. Peel and stick to the base, and the heavy drawers glide in and out.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

787 posts in 751 days


#9 posted 12-19-2020 12:38 PM

For dimensionaly stable case work made from sheetgoods, finishing the inside is optional (IMHO). For a piece like yours, If I did not put finish on before the glue up, I would certainly not be finishing it after and give it a second thought to leave it as is. If I want to finish the inside of a piece, then shellac or lacquer is the way to go or simply a coat of wipe on sealer such as seal-a-cell.

Your project is looking good. Best of luck on the outcome.

View JIMMIEM's profile (online now)

JIMMIEM

114 posts in 1814 days


#10 posted 12-19-2020 02:28 PM

Besides not needing to apply a finish to the inside, as others have already said, applying poly in a garage in the winter in Philly will be a real problem. I was applying poly in my unfinished basement in the winter and had to use one of those oil filled radiators to get the air temp high enough so that the poly would flow correctly.
Question: What kind of glue are you using? Kind of cold in the garage.

View lengal's profile

lengal

23 posts in 36 days


#11 posted 12-19-2020 03:24 PM

I have a kerosene forced air heater that I use to warm up the garage. I let it run for a while to get up to about 65 degrees then turn it off and on to keep cozy. The garage is very drafty so fresh air comes in constantly from above the rafters.. I am using titebond ll for glue with screws

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lengal

23 posts in 36 days


#12 posted 12-19-2020 03:28 PM

Any suggestions on what I should put on the top where the mattress will sit. I was gonna put polyurethane on it but maybe I should put something else on top. Or, do even need to seal it on top?

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lengal

23 posts in 36 days


#13 posted 12-19-2020 03:32 PM


I never finish the inside of a project with polyurethane. In an enclosed space like behind a drawer, or in a drawer for that matter, the volatiles take seemingly forever to gas off, and the finish effectively contaminates whatever is in the space. The rare times I need to finish the inside of something, I use shellac.

Go ahead and paint the exteriors, etc. and move on with your life.

- Sycamoray

I completely agree with what Sycamoray said above.

One thing to note however is, if I looked at the right video, that the drawers are not having any runners. If that is so, I would suggest to put a good amount of paste wax on the bottom of the interior (where the drawers ride on), and on the drawer bottom edges as well. This will make a hell of a difference in how nice they will glide…

- DrTebi

I never finish the inside of a project with polyurethane. In an enclosed space like behind a drawer, or in a drawer for that matter, the volatiles take seemingly forever to gas off, and the finish effectively contaminates whatever is in the space. The rare times I need to finish the inside of something, I use shellac.

Go ahead and paint the exteriors, etc. and move on with your life.

- Sycamoray

I completely agree with what Sycamoray said above.

One thing to note however is, if I looked at the right video, that the drawers are not having any runners. If that is so, I would suggest to put a good amount of paste wax on the bottom of the interior (where the drawers ride on), and on the drawer bottom edges as well. This will make a hell of a difference in how nice they will glide…

- DrTebi

I will use the paste wax on the bottom. thanks

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lengal

23 posts in 36 days


#14 posted 12-19-2020 03:36 PM

Just to let you guys know, I am not good with computers. I’m trying to reply to some of the posts with the quote button and I don’t know if I am doing it right. So please bare with me

View JIMMIEM's profile (online now)

JIMMIEM

114 posts in 1814 days


#15 posted 12-19-2020 04:35 PM


Just to let you guys know, I am not good with computers. I m trying to reply to some of the posts with the quote button and I don t know if I am doing it right. So please bare with me

- lengal


Just click the quote button and start typing your reply on the line below the blockquote.
I use polyurethane top, bottom, inside, outside. Once the offgassing smell goes away everything will be fine. Sometimes the offgassing can take a while to dissipate.

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