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Forum topic by rnels21 posted 12-13-2020 06:03 PM 922 views 1 time favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rnels21

8 posts in 1116 days


12-13-2020 06:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: crosscut sled

I have made a new crosscut sled that doesn’t seem to glide easily. It doesn’t seem to be to be the glide bars, but maybe is. I get it to flow smoothly, remove it, put it back and it sticks. (?). I treat the saw surface with BoeshieldT90. Could it be that?

-- MSsurvivor


17 replies so far

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OldBull

557 posts in 630 days


#1 posted 12-13-2020 06:07 PM

On mine the moisture in the air changes it quite often. If you sand the glide bars (if they are wood) do it slowly and sneak up on it.

It is paste wax that always seems to be recommended for easy movement and table top maintenance.

Make sure the bottom and glide bars are waxed
make sure the slot is clean
Some use pencil marks to help see where the heavy rubbing is but I used painters tape and it showed where to sand. Sand very little at a time.

View LesB's profile

LesB

3240 posts in 4777 days


#2 posted 12-13-2020 06:30 PM

I use SlipIt as a lubricant instead of wax.

What type of wood did you use for the bars. Some will expand and contract more then others.

-- Les B, Oregon

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AlaskaGuy

6831 posts in 3644 days


#3 posted 12-13-2020 06:35 PM

Make some new runners using the most stable wood you have available to you. Orientate the grain of the runners so when they expand and contract with the environmental changes wood moves up and down in the miter slot.

I assume your runners are not ridding on the bottom of the miter slot.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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therealSteveN

9387 posts in 1909 days


#4 posted 12-13-2020 09:21 PM



I have made a new crosscut sled that doesn’t seem to glide easily.
- rnels21

Usually the #1 thing will be a slight misalignment of the guide bars.

What are the ones you used made of, and do they have an adjustment?

-- Think safe, be safe

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therealSteveN

9387 posts in 1909 days


#5 posted 12-13-2020 09:42 PM



Make some new runners using the most stable wood you have available to you. Orientate the grain of the runners so when they expand and contract with the environmental changes wood moves up and down in the miter slot.

I assume your runners are not ridding on the bottom of the miter slot.

- AlaskaGuy

2 very good points.

The wood you want is quarter sawn, something hard like hard maple is better than a softie like pine. The best is the adjustable plastic, or aluminum, like the ones sold by Incra, and Micro Jig, they allow you to put them in sloppy, and tighten them once in place, or close to it.

The one on the right is the look you want of the end grain. Left is flat sawn, middle is rift sawn, and right is quarter sawn.

Micro Jig bars

Looks like Incra priced themselves out of the market…..

Plus 10000000 to NOT have them resting on the bottom of the miter slot, always have them below the depth of the slot, and put some pennies down to raise them before attaching.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Loren

11369 posts in 4982 days


#6 posted 12-13-2020 10:52 PM

You can put chalk or maybe crayon on the sides of the runners. Where it rubs off is your high spot. It can be scraped with a chisel, plane iron, razor blade, etc. held at 90 degrees to the work. Sanding works too.

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Redoak49

5467 posts in 3323 days


#7 posted 12-13-2020 11:00 PM

Initially, I tried wooden slides and had seasonal issues with the fit. I now use the Incra Miter Slider bar which is about $22. When I need to make a new sled , I take it off the old sled and put it on the new one. This is so much better than solid wood.

View moke's profile

moke

2124 posts in 4111 days


#8 posted 12-13-2020 11:07 PM

I do a similar thing to Loren. I used some kids sidewalk chalk (available everywhere) or I have a drafting pencil pointer that is full of graphite. Coat the side of the runner, and run it back and forth a few times. Then I take a fine or course file (depending on how bad it is) put it on its side against the runner and file where there is no graphite or chalk. You will more than likely not get it in the first try. and dependent on what the runner material is, it may expand and contract depending on the humidity.

I either buy the bonafide runner, usually aluminum or if I’m feeling cheap I buy a extra large cutting board at Sams ( $17 for a 16×20”—you’ll have plenty for more projects) and drum sand it to height ( which I usually sand it thinner- this is not critical ) then cut it to width. I have lately been cutting it about 1/128 to a 1/64 too thin. Drill and counter sink and mount on bottom. The tighter you put it, the more it will expand, then I use my file to size it precisely. This will not expand or contract with weather. DON”T get carried away getting it too tight to expand it. Forget gluing it on, glue does not stick to UHMW material.

-- Mike

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

8802 posts in 2722 days


#9 posted 12-13-2020 11:21 PM

When I tried Boeshield I made the mistake of putting it on too thick so I could see how that could cause a problem if you let that happen. I prefer paste wax on the saw top and it won’t hurt to wax the bottom of the sled as well.

Are you saying that it works, you remove it and immediately put it back on and it doesn’t slide well? Make sure that the slides are well attached and aren’t flexing.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1477 posts in 1245 days


#10 posted 12-13-2020 11:50 PM

What I did to eliminate the binding that wood runners sometimes have, is use the Rockler T-tracks as the miter bar (fits perfectly into the tabletop slots 3/8”x3/4” with no slop). https://www.rockler.com/17-piece-universal-t-track-kit Just cut the aluminum T-track to the length you need, and sand the end corners so they’re not sharp. They already have the screws holes in them, so installing onto the sleds and jigs is quick. I bought two of these T-track kits for $19.95 each kit on sale. Gave me more then enough T-tracks for the underside miter bar slots and T-tracks for the top of the sleds for clamping wood onto the jigs and sleds.

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gerrym526

331 posts in 5143 days


#11 posted 12-22-2020 04:55 AM

All of my crosscut sleds (have 4 of different sizes) were made with hard maple runners. If they were sticky at first, I used beeswax on them.
I also paste wax my tablesaw top 4-5 times per year. Found I didn’t need to wax the crosscut sleds if they were made of baltic birch, as long as the saw top was waxed.
Hope this helps.
Gerry

-- Gerry

View JoeFuture's profile

JoeFuture

50 posts in 506 days


#12 posted 01-07-2021 09:32 PM

What drives me nuts about the Incra V27 miter bar is the play you get in the slot until you’ve gone in far enough that 2-3 of the expanders are in the slot. Is that problem reduced at all with their miter slider bars? I see that those seem to have expanders on the very ends, which I could imagine helping a bit.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

5156 posts in 2829 days


#13 posted 01-08-2021 12:45 AM


What drives me nuts about the Incra V27 miter bar is the play you get in the slot until you ve gone in far enough that 2-3 of the expanders are in the slot. Is that problem reduced at all with their miter slider bars? I see that those seem to have expanders on the very ends, which I could imagine helping a bit.

- JoeFuture

Have same complaint with most retail miter bars. The MicroJig Zero play miter bar in only one I have seen that solves that issue. Just wished they were longer as I find myself needed 2 on larger sled.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, Doom, despair, agony on me… - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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JoeFuture

50 posts in 506 days


#14 posted 01-08-2021 12:48 AM


Have same complaint with most retail miter bars. The MicroJig Zero play miter bar in only one I have seen that solves that issue. Just wished they were longer as I find myself needed 2 on larger sled.

Length is exactly my problem (no jokes please). When I tried to square up a 21” wide panel using my V27 on a 27” contractor saw table, by the time I got enough of the miter bar into the slot I was already closer than 21” between the fence and the blade. I’m planning on making the runners for my crosscut sled much longer to compensate, though I realize that makes storage a bit trickier and I’ll have to be careful not to break them off if I use wood.

View metolius's profile

metolius

432 posts in 2065 days


#15 posted 01-08-2021 02:18 AM

I have some extra Trex composite boards left over from a deck rebuild. While it doesn’t change with the weather and the surface has a good slickness, the material isn’t super stiff. I think a next-sled will try the material as runners.

-- derek / oregon

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