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Forum topic by Austin6 posted 12-08-2020 04:53 PM 578 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Austin6

24 posts in 187 days


12-08-2020 04:53 PM

Hello my wise friends,

I was given an old Grizzly G1174 copy lathe a few years back and I have to say, woodturning is an addiction like no other. I could’ve never guessed that I would be so intrigued by something like this, but here I am.

My post is a somewhat strange one, that doesn’t have much to do with actual woodturning and hopefully hasn’t been answered in the past. As just a casual hobbyist woodworker/turner, I don’t have a 2000 square foot shop. That means, that I really need all of the space that I do have to count, and provide meaningful storage. Unfortunately, the old steel bases that Lathe’s come on, are the exact opposite of what I need. They are large, bulky, impossible to move, and might be the furthest thing from a storage solution that has ever existed. Is there any recommendations of a custom base design (presumably I would frame with dimensional lumber and plywood) with storage that would be ultra-sturdy enough to hold strong while a piece is relatively out of balance. This might be a little more involved and could be very specific to individual instances, but I felt like it was worth seeing what the old timers have to say.

Thanks,
Austin


8 replies so far

View LesB's profile

LesB

2855 posts in 4448 days


#1 posted 12-08-2020 06:20 PM

You could add retractable wheels to the existing base frame and build a cabinet within the framework. I suggest retractable wheels because the height of the lathe is critical in that it needs to positing the center of the lathe so it is approximately the same height as you elbow when you arms is hanging down. If it is too tall the the lathe tool will be held in an unstable position.

There are even plans for making your own retractable wheels: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/378654281147097128/

To replace the base and build you own search on the internet...Lathe Cabinet Plans...there are lots of them.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Brawler

201 posts in 835 days


#2 posted 12-08-2020 06:36 PM

Unfortunately, the old steel bases that Lathe s come on, are the exact opposite of what I need. They are large, bulky, impossible to move, and might be the furthest thing from a storage solution that has ever existed.

- Austin6

There is a good reason they are bulky and hard to move, the more a lathe weighs the better off you are. Many people use ballast weight on their lathes to dampen vibration

-- Daniel, Pontiac, MI

View Bob5103's profile

Bob5103

191 posts in 1838 days


#3 posted 12-08-2020 08:14 PM

I am in the same situation, limited shop space. This is what I came up with for my lathe.

It should be possible to make something similar for your lathe. There is enough weight with the lathe and cabinet combined that I haven’t had a need to add ballast. Plus I really like the added drawer space.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8405 posts in 3204 days


#4 posted 12-08-2020 08:39 PM

Best lathe base is concrete… everything else is a compromise ;)

Grizzly G1174 catalog picture:

Your lathe should have come with a stand, and a bottom shelf can be added for storage and or weight. A mobile base can be added as well, to make it easier to move around. Looking at it, a standard lathe stand may not work due to the copy mechanism hanging off the bottom – unless you intend to forego that and use it as a standard wood lathe w/banjo and tool rest. What do you plan on using it for? If doing spindles and small stuff, then you really don’t need much in the way of structure.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Austin6's profile

Austin6

24 posts in 187 days


#5 posted 12-08-2020 09:45 PM



I am in the same situation, limited shop space. This is what I came up with for my lathe.

It should be possible to make something similar for your lathe. There is enough weight with the lathe and cabinet combined that I haven t had a need to add ballast. Plus I really like the added drawer space.

- Bob5103

Thanks all for your responses! Bob5103, I like that design and mobility, I will give it a go!

View mike02719's profile

mike02719

290 posts in 4791 days


#6 posted 12-09-2020 02:42 PM

If your lathe is similar to the one in a previous post, the legs will not add to stability. The “bench” by Austin6 is functional and you can modify it to suit your needs. Use twobys (2×4,2×6) and you will be better off.

-- Mike, Massachusetts

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spindeepster

50 posts in 2295 days


#7 posted 12-09-2020 09:51 PM

Mine. An old dining room “side board” came in real handy!

View Austin6's profile

Austin6

24 posts in 187 days


#8 posted 12-10-2020 04:05 PM



If your lathe is similar to the one in a previous post, the legs will not add to stability. The “bench” by Austin6 is functional and you can modify it to suit your needs. Use twobys (2×4,2×6) and you will be better off.

- mike02719

Thanks, the one posted above is the exact base I have. I was also going to mention the point that you made. THe base is not particularly heavy although it is very large and bulky. It does not seem to be fantastic at holding the lathe tight when a piece is out of balance. So in my opinion, I didn’t see a point in keeping it. I can guarantee that whatever I make will be infinitely heavier though.

Thanks for sharing.

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