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Why is THIS not a square?

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Forum topic by Madmark2 posted 12-07-2020 08:07 PM 2055 views 0 times favorited 57 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Madmark2

3157 posts in 1874 days


12-07-2020 08:07 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question square layout

It marks perfectly perpendicular and allows parallel scribing. Some say it’s not a square and I want to know WHY?


It marks at perfect 90° – so why isn’t it a square?

If a line drawn by this matches the line from a Starrett then isn’t this a square?

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!


57 replies so far

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BlasterStumps

2154 posts in 1726 days


#1 posted 12-07-2020 08:13 PM

I like it Mark, what brand is it? I’ve been looking at a few of those wondering which one to get. It would be square enough for me : ). Also wondering what length would be a good all-rounder?

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." MIke in CO

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OldBull

541 posts in 582 days


#2 posted 12-07-2020 08:19 PM

I took a look at these incra measuring tools and they were thin and flexible, I didn’t expect that.

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SMP

4965 posts in 1192 days


#3 posted 12-07-2020 08:21 PM

That would be called a T-rule. Thats like asking why isn’t tool X called tool Y even though they can do similar things.

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northwoodsman

682 posts in 5032 days


#4 posted 12-07-2020 08:35 PM

I have some play in mine. If you don’t properly register the blade with the extrusion, it isn’t square. It all depends on what the item was designed for. A piece of 8.5” x 11” paper is square, but is it a “square”?

-- NorthWoodsMan

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TravisH

783 posts in 3221 days


#5 posted 12-07-2020 08:38 PM

I don’t know you should take it up with Incra.

It excels as a fine layout tool and definitely can mark something square but overall something I haven’t found much use for in my daily routine as more of a one trick pony. I doubt I have used mine a dozen times in several years. I would say it is safe to say most woodworkers would take a Starrett any day.

I would never check to see if a blade is perpendicular to a table, quickly check a joint, score a line, check a mortise depth, etc.. and all in a much more robust package compared to the Incra.

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BigMig

655 posts in 3899 days


#6 posted 12-07-2020 08:40 PM

Mark,
I use the heck out of mine, whatever it’s called. Mine’s made by Incra. But – I don’t use it to make 90 degree marks from the face. Maybe that’s why it’s not called a square.

-- Mike from Lansdowne, PA

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Madmark2

3157 posts in 1874 days


#7 posted 12-07-2020 08:50 PM

Old bull:
Thin and flexible but only in one axis. Ridgid as hell in the other two. There is a perpendicular 3” end rule on them and the flex makes it easy to check in odd spaces.

Northwoodsman:
You’ll have play in your Starrett too if you don’t tighten the nut! Sheesh, what a complaint “Its loose when I don’t tighten it.” Doesn’t sound like a tool issue to me!

BigMig:
My 6” Incra rule is my most used measuring and layout device. I have the 12” and 18” versions as well but they aren’t needed too often, but all three are dead on in both directions.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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AMZ

346 posts in 675 days


#8 posted 12-07-2020 09:00 PM

I have one and I quite like it! However, I would not substitute it for a square, but for accurately running lines, it can’t be beat!. I have many squares, including Starrets. But my absolute square is a Woodpecker tri-square. The red color of heavily used tools helps in locating them.

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Craftsman on the lake

3887 posts in 4724 days


#9 posted 12-07-2020 09:03 PM

I’ve had one awhile and I use it all the time.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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Loren

11311 posts in 4934 days


#10 posted 12-07-2020 09:11 PM

I reckon it doesn’t meet the tolerances of INCRA’s squares so they don’t call it one. They probably don’t want to guarantee it square with the sliding arrangement. I wouldn’t if I were them.

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Rich

7567 posts in 1875 days


#11 posted 12-07-2020 09:33 PM

Why is THIS not a chisel? They both have sharp beveled edges and cut wood:

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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SMP

4965 posts in 1192 days


#12 posted 12-07-2020 09:41 PM



Why is THIS not a chisel? They both have sharp beveled edges and cut wood:

- Rich

That is obviously a hammer. I use one for hammering in finish nails.

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Rich

7567 posts in 1875 days


#13 posted 12-07-2020 09:44 PM


That is obviously a hammer. I use one for hammering in finish nails.

- SMP

Yes and no. But, why is THIS not a hammer?

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Rich

7567 posts in 1875 days


#14 posted 12-07-2020 09:46 PM

...And why is THIS not a pry bar?

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

30065 posts in 3969 days


#15 posted 12-07-2020 10:10 PM

Willing to bet, that these are called squares…

Stanley No. 20, 8” to check a corner for…..square….
and..

Framer Square, used as a straight edge….looking for high spots…

Can the OP’s device do this….

Getting a depth stop set up to the correct depth…..

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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