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Forum topic by TDinDC posted 12-04-2020 05:56 PM 491 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TDinDC

11 posts in 56 days


12-04-2020 05:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw taper jig question

I have need of 2×4s tapered to provide a level frame for installing a Screen-tight system on an existing porch. The porch has 2×4 bases in each of 7 sections, installed horizontally with the 4” dimension being vertical. At the ends of each section are vertical 2×4s extending from the floor to the ceiling of the porch, and offset from the horizontal bases by varying amounts, around 1/2” typically, but not consistently. The same inconsistencies apply to the offsets at the upper end of the sections between the vertical beams and the 1×10s extending down from the porch ceiling.

So, the issue is how to taper cut 2×4s parallel to the 4” dimension. All the taper jigs I have seen have the workpiece clamped down on top of the jig – typically 3/4” plywood. But a 10” table saw blade can cut only 3-1/2” or less so the workpiece can’t be mounted atop the jig and clamping it down would press it onto the table saw bed. Furthermore, each section has slightly different length and tapering requirements so a fixed geometry jig won’t work.

I am not a professional woodworker and do not have a planer, joiner or bandsaw. My tools are limited to a table saw, a circular saw, a handheld jigsaw, and a handheld router, plus hand tools.

-- TDinDC


14 replies so far

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2814 posts in 3614 days


#1 posted 12-04-2020 06:24 PM

It’s not clear to me exactly what you are trying to do, but I will say that if you can cut partway through the 2×4 with the table saw, you can come back and finish the cut with a hand saw or the jigsaw, using the table-saw cut as a guide. Then you could clean it up with a handplane, if you have one.

For just a few cuts, you don’t have to have a taper jig. I have taped a scrap block on the side at the end of the piece that is to be smallest and cut (carefully) with that block against the fence. I did some careful calculations first.

If the tapered section is long, you may have to clamp a straight board to your fence as an auxialliary fence so that you can start with the block against the fence. Rockler’s universal fence clamps are good for that, but you can improvise with other clamps.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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therealSteveN

7013 posts in 1550 days


#2 posted 12-04-2020 07:48 PM

If I understand correctly you want to cut through the 3 1/2” side of a 2×4, so TS. or circ saw are not going to be a deep enough cut.

Using a TS is going to be awkward if the angle keeps changing, you would have to build something that allowed you to run against a straight fence, because at the end of the day free handing on a TS is how Osorio met One World Technolgies.

This leaves you with buying a bandsaw or borrowing use of one from someone locally, and then it’s as easy as cutting to the line, which is a safe and doable procedure.

Not having a BS to use it pretty much leaves a beer powered hand saw, or an electrical circular saw. With the circ saw, UNLESS it’s some kind of bigfoot design with a large blade diameter, it’s a 2 cut (once from each side), but you are still sawing to a line, which is done daily by carpenters. The handsaw is a learning curve to HOW, somewhat longer than the same path for a powered circ saw. Safety wise the circ saw can inflict bodily harm if it somehow got away from you, with the handsaw you almost have to be trying, to get hurt.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Loren

10939 posts in 4624 days


#3 posted 12-04-2020 08:01 PM

How long are the pieces that need to be tapered? What’s the length of the taper?

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Ocelot

2814 posts in 3614 days


#4 posted 12-04-2020 08:21 PM

photos would be most helpful!

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2096 posts in 1564 days


#5 posted 12-05-2020 05:35 AM

You’ll need to do the tapers on a 12” saw to cut past 3”. You could cut 3” on a 10” TS using the two leg ($20 alum, no baseplate) type taper jig and then finish with a handsaw. The kerf makes a perfect guide for cutting the last 1/2”.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Robert's profile

Robert

4330 posts in 2456 days


#6 posted 12-05-2020 12:10 PM

I have no idea what you’re talking about.

Provide a pic or drawing please.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Madmark2

2096 posts in 1564 days


#7 posted 12-05-2020 02:55 PM


Alum taper jig – illustration is not the safest way to feed

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

1132 posts in 2195 days


#8 posted 12-07-2020 12:54 PM

if im reading this correctly and without pics, this seems like a good place to shim to what ya need

View TDinDC's profile

TDinDC

11 posts in 56 days


#9 posted 12-07-2020 05:02 PM

Here are two pics of the situation I needed to remedy. They are of the base and header of one section of the porch I’m going to screen. As can be seen, the verticals (studs) are offset from the base and header. This was the existing construction after I demo’ed the older screens. (I added the picket railing as part of my renovation).

The issue was that, because of careless construction, the offset depths vary from section to section, and are different on the left and right ends of each section.

In order to install the ScreenTite system, a level frame is needed all around each section. Therefore came the need to furr out the bases and headers.

I found a way to do that, which I will detail in subsequent posts. The issue I had to solve was how to taper cut in the 3-1/2” direction of the 2X4s that would furr out the offsets Because taper jigs have baseplates and 10” table saws can only cut a max depth of 3-1/2”, I needed to find an different accurate way to do these long (typically 37”) taper cuts.

-- TDinDC

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Madmark2

2096 posts in 1564 days


#10 posted 12-07-2020 05:10 PM

Belt sander.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View TDinDC's profile

TDinDC

11 posts in 56 days


#11 posted 12-07-2020 05:22 PM

After discarding several ideas, I came up with a system similar to the photo shown in Madmark2’s post.

I created it out of 3/4” Baltic plywood, 40” long and 3-1/2” high. A double-thickness back fence rides against the saw’s fence and a front fence is attached to it with a hinge at one end.

The back fence has a 3/8-16 x (various) bolt through it 36” from the hinged end, attached by a t-nut to dial in the angle of the taper (one turn = 1/16”). Various length bolts are needed to accomodate differing taper angles to that the bolt head does not protrude out iof the back fence.

The end of the front fence away from the hinge has a 1/4” deep stop block to help feed the workpiece. That end also has a strap that can be tightened to secure the taper angle.

The front fence has ruler tape on top. Both fences have heavy plastic tape on the bottom to make the jig slide easily. (Photos)

-- TDinDC

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TDinDC

11 posts in 56 days


#12 posted 12-07-2020 05:42 PM

HOW IT IS USED
To ensure that the taper is set correctly, the taper cut line is marked on the top side and in-feed end of the workpiece. The workpiece is then mounted flush against the stop block with the wider end against the front fence and at the end near the hinge (the offcut is to the left of the blade). The table saw’s fence is set to cut the workpiece at the line marked on its end. Calipers are used to measure from the back fence to the workpiece cut line on each end of it. The two measures need to be the same. The screw depth is adjusted to achieve this, and the tie bar locks the depth. Because the workpiece and jig are considerably longer than the table saw’s depth, a roller stand is used on the infeed and outfeed ends. A MicroJig Grripper assists in feeding the workpiece through the saw. The jig’s back fence is kept flush with the saw’s fence.

-- TDinDC

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2096 posts in 1564 days


#13 posted 12-07-2020 05:58 PM

Nice. Be sure to wax the bottom and back so it slides easily.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View TDinDC's profile

TDinDC

11 posts in 56 days


#14 posted 12-07-2020 06:13 PM

Madmark2: I tried several methods to make it slide easily. First I smoothed scrap pieces with 220 grit, then 600 grit sandpaper. I compared that with the same material that I had soaped and waxed with a candle. Neither was very good. Then I found some heavy plastic tape and applied it to the same piece (photo) and, voila! very slippery.

-- TDinDC

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