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Need advise on Grizzly G1023RLW

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Forum topic by wjbender posted 12-04-2020 05:55 PM 527 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wjbender

11 posts in 47 days


12-04-2020 05:55 PM

Looking to upgrade my 20 year old Rigid contractor saw. I read the reviews her on the Grizzly G1023RLW. This saw looks good for me, but I’m worried about how to get it into the house and down the basement stairs to my workshop. The shipping weight is listed as 550 pounds – Yikes!! I’d like to hear how some of you have gone about moving a heavy saw like this. Any suggestions??

thanks

-- Hobbyist and Sometime Woodworker - New Jersey


17 replies so far

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Robert

4292 posts in 2449 days


#1 posted 12-04-2020 06:25 PM

Just like the Johnny Cash song says “one piece at a time”

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Ocelot

2772 posts in 3606 days


#2 posted 12-04-2020 06:30 PM

The top, motor, guards etc are separate parts. Actually, the top may be 3 parts.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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therealSteveN

6971 posts in 1542 days


#3 posted 12-04-2020 07:00 PM

The Basement shop, also known as how the heck do I get this beast down there.

Parting the saw is one way, others find enough helpers and the whole enchilada can go down. Others enlist straps and pulleys, to gently lower it down after putting plywood, cardboard and whatnot on the steps to turn them into a slip and slide.

I have been part or party to a number of saws down stairs, and I’ve found shedding the outside table wings makes it a LOT easier to go into door openings, but at the same time you loose what invariably are handholds. BUT they are really NOT hand holds, so get rid of the wings, and use yours, a neighbors or rent a hand truck to set the saw on, and rope, belt, come-along, it to the hand truck. I find one below, and one on the truck, with the truck itself tethered to a FIRM point of attachment, or several drunk bystanders is probably the smoothest of ways to get er done.

Work the wheels step by step, and it will usually take a lot more time tying it onto the truck, and then to the drunks than it does going down the stairs.

I talk of the drunks in jest only, no drunks should ever be involved with real work, it could prove harmful. Usually they never feel a thing, it’s you who gets hurt. :-)

-- Think safe, be safe

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wjbender

11 posts in 47 days


#4 posted 12-04-2020 07:05 PM

Can anyone comment on the lift gate service provided by most shippers. Will they back the truck up to your garage and assist you moving it into the garage, or just drop it at the curb a say “have a nice day”? I’d like to hear about how some of you have handled this.

Thanks

-- Hobbyist and Sometime Woodworker - New Jersey

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Ocelot

2772 posts in 3606 days


#5 posted 12-04-2020 07:53 PM

i tried lift-gate service once. The driver refused to enter my driveway, so it was useless for me. I met him at a nearby gas station and transfered my 400lb bandsaw into my mini-van laying down.

If you have a truck and can pick it up at the depot where they can forklift it on, you can then open the box at home while still on the truck and take it out piece by piece.

I can’t comment on that particular saw. It may not be as easy as my contractor saw.

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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wjbender

11 posts in 47 days


#6 posted 12-04-2020 09:16 PM

My new saw is looking more and more like a Jet Pro Shop II rather than the heavier Grizzley. The Grizz is probably overkill for the type of projects and amount of time I’ll spend using it. Honestly months can go by I don’t even look at the table saw. I am pretty fussy when I do projects, therefore I want a saw that is well built, reliable, accurate, with a good fence system, good dust control, and modern safety features. There are lots of favorable comments on the Jet on this site and from personal experience with other Jet equipment support is very good too. For 20 years I’ve been using a Rigid contractor saw that is wide open all around and dust and chips just fly everywhere. The fence on that thing is also not to be trusted, and the safety features are almost non existent.

I called jet technical support. The Jet main component without wings, adjustment handles, fence etc. weighs 190 lbs. So along with your suggestions of a hand truck and come-along, and a couple of friends, that is manageable.
Thanks everyone for your suggestions.

-- Hobbyist and Sometime Woodworker - New Jersey

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CaptainKlutz

3988 posts in 2462 days


#7 posted 12-05-2020 03:58 AM

If you want a cabinet saw in the basement, buy one!
Do not let basement shop deter your goals.

Getting heavy stuff up and down stairs is easy with right tools.
IMHO – Anyone with basement shop egress only should know how to use an appliance dolly.
HF sells one, as do many others. U-Haul will rent you one too. Here is picture from HF site:

The appliance dolly has these handy wheels/belts on back side to assist with rolling the weight up/down stairs.

IME – Typical person can handle ~1x their body weight without any help going down stairs (thanks to gravity). Those of those trained to use our legs for lifting, can move as much weight as we they can leg press 20 times in gym. Two persons; one in front and one on top; can move most tools easily. These work best with 2 people, so bottom person block the dolly and prevent it rolling down the stairs all alone when top person drops the handles. DAMHIK #IAMAKLUTZ

Modern times have invented a stair climbing dolly with a lifting assist motor. Some of the commercial rental outfits offer power assisted stair climbers for rent. Here is one random online pic:

Average cabinet saw has ~24”x27-28” cast iron top, and after removing the wings and hand wheels; they strap to dolly quite well. You will find that contractor saws use same size top, and are same SIZE challenge to move through doorways and stairs.

A good hand truck with decent wheels is handy tool to own in shop. I use a standard 2 wheeled hand truck to move full assembled table saw (wings/fence/everything), weighing 400-500lb, on/off trailer ramp when I buy tools to restore. On flat ground, one person can move a 400-500lb 55gal drum of most anything providing the drum is strapped to hand truck.

Moving stuff is all about leverage, not muscle. Work smart, not hard.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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therealSteveN

6971 posts in 1542 days


#8 posted 12-05-2020 06:00 AM


Can anyone comment on the lift gate service provided by most shippers. Will they back the truck up to your garage and assist you moving it into the garage, or just drop it at the curb a say “have a nice day”? I d like to hear about how some of you have handled this.

Thanks

- wjbender

I’ve had 4 deliveries from Griz, all of mine came on UPS semi shuttles, 3 long trailers, one a shortie. Splendid guys all 4 times, rolled it off, and wheeled it right into the shop for me. I’m in SW Ohio close to Middletown, now by postings of this exact same question some people have different experiences. I do know I was called 2 days before each, and they always offered that I could go to the freight hub, and pick it up from there. I had already paid the lift gate fee when I bought my first tool, an 8” Jointer, so I said bring it. Experience was so good I kept doing that.

It was a HEAVY SOB, realy glad I didn’t try to do any of the lifting by hand. My neighbor Phil, and I handled it the gentlemans way. We used heavy equipment…...

-- Think safe, be safe

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WoodenDreams

1219 posts in 879 days


#9 posted 12-05-2020 06:37 AM

The saw is shipped in a couple of boxes (not assembled). My grizzy G0771z in not as heavy. Did come in two large boxes on two separate pallets. What I did was unpack it in the driveway. Unbolteded the base from the pallet. Carried to the basement the smaller individual pieces. Used a appliance dolley to wheel the other pieces to the basement. The cast iron top came in three pieces. Assembled after in basement. Like a elephant. One part at a time.

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WoodenDreams

1219 posts in 879 days


#10 posted 12-05-2020 06:38 PM

For lift gate service. The driver uses a pallet jack to move the pallet to the lift gate. lowers it to the street level and off to the street. The driver will normally use the pallet jack to roll it to or into the driveway and drop it in the driveway or against the curb. If you have a gravel driveway (which what most of my neighbors have), only expect it off the lift gate, cause you can’t roll the pallet jack on gravel. With my driveway being concrete and level with the street, the driver and I rolled the pallet jack 30 feet into the driveway, before removing the pallet jack.

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BlueRidgeDog

787 posts in 747 days


#11 posted 12-05-2020 06:51 PM

I guess I cheated. I called in a favor from my maintenance department. Four guys that moved heavy stuff five days a week showed up and did it in five minutes…by hand.

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Fred Hargis

6729 posts in 3461 days


#12 posted 12-05-2020 06:59 PM

I wouldn’t shy away from the 1023 because of the shipping weight. Those saws just all that tough to move, even for one person. You do need to be careful, and despite what I said…it helps to have 2 folks. But the saw proper can be flipped on it’s table and 2 wheel with an appliance dolly like Klutz linked. Everything else is hand carry. The dollies can be rented almost anywhere that rents things, and if you buy one like the HF freight one…it’s not that expensive. Regardless, good luck with your choice; and CONGRATS.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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CaptainKlutz

3988 posts in 2462 days


#13 posted 12-05-2020 10:20 PM

+1 lift gate delivery service experience depends on type of driveway and curb at end driveway.

It also depends on type of truck they use.
Which is one of the questions you should ask when they call to confirm your lift gate delivery. :)

If they use use short box truck, those are light enough to back up drive and not break average thin concrete drive or leave divots in your asphalt.
If they bring the large 40ft+ tractor/trailer rig, they have park in street due weight.
Since most pallet jacks won’t go over any rough surfaces, you can be left using a dolly or wheel barrow getting it up driveway and into house.
Many big trucks won’t pull into a cul-de-sac either; and your stuck moving the saw down the street.
Which is just another reason for terminal pickup. :-)

therealSteveN: How is OP supposed to get that bobcat down the stairs? LOL

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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Picken5

327 posts in 3660 days


#14 posted 12-06-2020 02:03 AM

I have Grizzly G0690 cabinet saw in my basement shop that I bought about 6 years ago. I used the lift gate service of the trucking company they used. The driver had a walk-behind fork lift (pallet jack maybe?) and not only unloaded the saw (using the lift gate), he moved it up my gently sloped driveway and into my garage for me. The fence and rails were shipped with the table saw but boxed separately. I thanked the driver, tipped him $30, and started the dismantling process. Removing the cast iron top was pretty easy, and, if I recall correctly the cast iron wings were not installed on the saw. I carried the top and wings down the stairs to my basement on a standard hand cart — i.e. dolly. I did not remove the motor or anything else in the cabinet. I did, however get my plumber son-in-law to help me with a stair-climbing dolly to get the main cabinet down there. (It seems a stair-climbing dolly is pretty common equipment for plumbers since they have to frequently move water heaters and such.) Anyway, the process went pretty smoothly and I had my saw up and running about a week after I got it. Good luck!

-- Howard - "Time spent making sawdust is not deducted from one's lifetime." - old Scottish proverb

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skatefriday

487 posts in 2451 days


#15 posted 12-06-2020 04:18 AM

I love my 1023RLW. The delivery driver used a pallet jack to pull the saw up to my garage door. I tipped him $20 and felt that was $20 well spent. I suppose it just depends upon the driver and his schedule as to what you get. The wings do not come assembled and as others have said, are not lift points anyway. I removed the cast iron top on my about 6 months into owning it to replace the arbor bearings. I don’t know, maybe I was unlucky, but that’s one thing they skimped on as mine failed pretty early. But it’s not hard to remove. You do need the machinist dial that Grizzly sells to square it back up when putting it back on, but you are going to want that anyway to verify the factory setting. I’d rent an industrial dolly, rig up some pulleys, and get my closest friends to help after we all are vaccinated.

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