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Forum topic by tommyc325 posted 12-03-2020 01:19 AM 629 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tommyc325

80 posts in 2324 days


12-03-2020 01:19 AM

Topic tags/keywords: suggestion shop

Hey Everyone

My wife and I just bought a new house (we close on Feb 1st) and Im looking for thoughts on where i should put my shop. One option is i build/buy a large shed (16×23) OR our basement that i can utilize 20×20.

The shed would cost around 12k for prep and shed delivery. The basement wouldn’t cost anything.

I had a bad experience with a basement shop before where my tools would get rusty and wood would warp. That house had steam heat and the basement was really musty.

The new house is baseboard heating through water lines and feels / smells dry.

I also live in NJ so weather is deff. a factor.

Would love your guys input.

Tom


21 replies so far

View seakuv's profile

seakuv

25 posts in 622 days


#1 posted 12-03-2020 01:34 AM

It’ll be a lot easier and cheaper to maintain a warm, dry shop in your basement (for the sake of your tools of course). The downside of a basement shop can be access, unless you’re lucky enough to have a daylight basement, and keeping the noise and sawdust from affecting the rest of the house.

-- DaveS, Montana

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tommyc325

80 posts in 2324 days


#2 posted 12-03-2020 02:00 AM



It ll be a lot easier and cheaper to maintain a warm, dry shop in your basement (for the sake of your tools of course). The downside of a basement shop can be access, unless you re lucky enough to have a daylight basement, and keeping the noise and sawdust from affecting the rest of the house.

- seakuv

I do have a set of bilco doors and i would spend some extra money on thick insulation to put up in the ceiling bays

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iminmyshop

358 posts in 2962 days


#3 posted 12-03-2020 02:07 AM

For me it would come down to what I could afford and how large my projects were. Lots of jewelry boxes? Stay in the basement and put in a dehumidifier if moisture is an issue, beef up the lighting and make it a usable space. If your building a solid wood dresser, getting it up the stairs without breaking your back might be best avoided.

An alternative is to start in your basement, see how it works and then consider building a shed later if space is tight or you find access is a real problem. I started in a basement shop but my saw then was a Sears contractor’s saw. There is no way I could get my current equipment in and out of a basement shop.

-- http://www.alansfinewoodworking.com/

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Furnone

22 posts in 1104 days


#4 posted 12-03-2020 02:17 AM

I have a walkout basement and hot water baseboard heat. I added a heating zone to the basement and it is warm and dry.
Curiously, it did not add to my oil consumption. Several years later, I put an addition on with a 16×16 sunroom off the kitchen and a 16×16 shop below with double doors. I extended the heat to add a zone for the sunroom and my shop below, again, no appreciable increase in oil consumption. It is dry and comfortable.

So, I would opt for the basement keeping those bilco doors in mind if you build a lot of large projects.

-- I will not lower my quality standards, so up yours!

View Bstrom's profile

Bstrom

258 posts in 141 days


#5 posted 12-03-2020 02:22 AM

Access to the refrigerator should be a prime consideration – interpret that any way you like! Plus, rain, cold, etc. are a thought – maybe the shed can store materials for the basement shop. You are going to run out of room no matter where you put it!

-- Bstrom

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woodbutcherbynight

7233 posts in 3377 days


#6 posted 12-03-2020 02:26 AM

Basement would be a good start. Later if you grow out of it, sure build something. Or consider a finishing room. Just got access to such a room that is detached from shop and has heat, as well as ventilation I put in. HUGE difference not having to deal with dust and heavy clean up from construction of projects.

Grow into it though, don’t rush.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View tommyc325's profile

tommyc325

80 posts in 2324 days


#7 posted 12-03-2020 03:07 AM

It would be good to note that I am a hobbyist.

Any recommendations on what to purchase to help control the elements?

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1219 posts in 879 days


#8 posted 12-03-2020 03:38 AM

My shop is in the basement. consistent temperature and humidity. The assembly, glue-up station and finishing area is in a separate room from the shop area. Less worry with wading dust landing on a project when applying finish. Lumber comes in through a window off the driveway. And the finished project leave through the stairway. Have air filtration units to help control the wading dust, and I have the cold air return vent closed off to prevent wading dust going through the house. On larger projects I make sections and assemble at the job site or a friends garage. I was going to rent out a shop or build a garage for a shop, but to save some moola, My wife let me take over most of the basement.

Depends on the size of the projects you want to do. Most of what I make are hope & cedar chests or smaller and furniture restoration. A separate shop away from the house is nice. With a separate shed as a workshop you’ll have extra expenses such as A/C, heating, etc

View them700project's profile

them700project

289 posts in 1987 days


#9 posted 12-03-2020 01:04 PM

If you go basement look into Santa Fe dehumidifier. They are solid and will last, most dehumidifiers will last a bit beyond warranty. Access is a major problem with basement. even with bilcos. I would suggest a track saw, 2 saw horses, shop vac kept in garage for breaking down any sheet goods in the garage(if you have one) Or at the very least saw horses and track saw to bring outside.

NJ weather isnt too crazy. Im in central jersey and work in unheated garage all year.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6729 posts in 3461 days


#10 posted 12-03-2020 01:20 PM

I like the advice above, start in the basement and grow into whatever comes next. You might find the basement is just what you want, if not move on to plan B.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View gilbert's profile

gilbert

1 post in 3800 days


#11 posted 12-03-2020 01:26 PM

the basement is good ( mine is in the basement) but the dust is everywhere, and sometimes tracks upstairs. noisy machines like planers, joiners add to the atmosphere of the upstairs guests going about their business. build the shed, insulate at your own pace and enjoy creating with fewer interruptions.

View drsurfrat's profile

drsurfrat

379 posts in 155 days


#12 posted 12-03-2020 01:41 PM

Mine’s in the basement, too. I am in MA.
Pros: Never uncomfortable winter or summer even without local dehumidifier, AC or heater. Walk-out basement, so no issues with sheets of plywood, or 10’+ boards Instant access, no walking outside just to grab a screwdriver
Cons: Have to spray finishes in garage/outside; fumes travel upstairs Noise can be heard, so no power tools after kids bedtime. (or during remote school) Dust isn’t a problem if i keep things swept up. But slippery stairs are NOT good.

-- Mike (near Boston) ... Laziness is the mother of invention, necessity is the mother of exhaustion - me

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Robert

4292 posts in 2449 days


#13 posted 12-03-2020 02:35 PM

How many machines can you buy for $12K :-D

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View them700project's profile

them700project

289 posts in 1987 days


#14 posted 12-03-2020 03:23 PM



How many machines can you buy for $12K :-D

- Robert

24 not so incredible ones or 1/10 of an amazing one

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

1129 posts in 2187 days


#15 posted 12-03-2020 05:49 PM



It would be good to note that I am a hobbyist.

Any recommendations on what to purchase to help control the elements?

- tommyc325

12k can do a LOT for a basement shop. look into sound deadening,dust collection/filtration, and more tools.

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