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Forum topic by stevejack posted 12-01-2020 01:46 PM 668 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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stevejack

213 posts in 296 days


12-01-2020 01:46 PM

The 3/4 MDF I am getting from Menards lowes and Home cheapo SUUUUCCCKKKKS. Today it’s no better than particle board.

Does anyone know of a source for quality MDF. preferable near St. Louis


15 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6746 posts in 3469 days


#1 posted 12-01-2020 01:51 PM

Your description kinda makes me think it’s normal, I didn’t know there was a quality MDF. In any case, I get the Menards stuff and it seems as good as anything else available. What specifically makes you think it’s worse than others? just curious.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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stevejack

213 posts in 296 days


#2 posted 12-01-2020 01:56 PM

Well there once was quality MDF. The stuff I got years ago was nice and hard. If you machined it it didnt need follow up Sanding. I use to be able to use a band saw on it and the edge was hard and sharp! Today its fussy like cardboard… Its all made overseas as well. None of it is made here! One would think Chinese political prisoners would have more pride in their work


Your description kinda makes me think it s normal, I didn t know there was a quality MDF. In any case, I get the Menards stuff and it seems as good as anything else available. What specifically makes you think it s worse than others? just curious.

- Fred Hargis


View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4015 posts in 2470 days


#3 posted 12-01-2020 02:39 PM

Know what you are buying?

This might help:
The different kinds of MDF (sometimes labeled by colour) are:
: Ultralight MDF plate (ULDF)[6]
: Moisture-resistant board is typically green
: Fire retardant MDF is typically red or blue

From – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium-density_fibreboard

Another Quote:
The industry differentiates between three density grades of MDF: low (weighs less than 40 lb. per cu. ft.), standard (40 lb. to 50 lb. per cu. ft.), and high (more than 50 lb. per cu. ft).
From – https://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/10/05/working-with-mdf

Much of the MDF sold at BORG is cheapest available, or low density MDF.

When I lived in St. Louis several decades ago, bought most of my sheet goods from Schaller Hardwood They sold plain MDF and veneer MDF sheets with different densities.
Fehlig Brothers tended to be cheaper, but not strong in veneer sheet goods I was using for cabinet work.
YMMV

Cheers.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4857 posts in 4710 days


#4 posted 12-01-2020 02:45 PM

There are different grades of MDF.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Rich

6398 posts in 1565 days


#5 posted 12-01-2020 02:58 PM


One would think Chinese political prisoners would have more pride in their work

- stevejack

Definitely the quote of the day. With respect to MDF, and sheet goods in general, there are clear differences out there. MDF gets a bad rap due, I think, to exactly what you’re describing. In fact, the finest hardwood veneered plywood I’ve used has a thin layer of MDF under the veneer on each side.

Regarding sources, we have a Hood Distribution location here in town. They are my go-to dealer for all of my sheet goods. Check locally for that sort of dealer. I would imagine St. Louis would have something equivalent.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View xedos's profile

xedos

187 posts in 276 days


#6 posted 12-01-2020 03:13 PM

“One would think Chinese political prisoners would have more pride in their work”

They do – it’s their masters, and their customers that specify what the product made is. And how much they want to pay.

High quality MDF is available. For a price.

The quality of the base fibers is what makes or breaks MDF. Moisture or even fire resistant sheets are available. Integrated color is also possible. From 1/4” all the way up to 2” thick. Look for “super refined” mdf.

Ranger Board and Plum Creek are the two big name brand players in this sector.

Be prepared to pay, and possibly order a skid if you want it. Sorry, I’ve got no leads for sources around the Loo.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6362 posts in 3285 days


#7 posted 12-01-2020 03:53 PM

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1437 posts in 1935 days


#8 posted 12-01-2020 04:08 PM



The 3/4 MDF I am getting from Menards lowes and Home cheapo SUUUUCCCKKKKS. Today it s no better than particle board.

Does anyone know of a source for quality MDF. preferable near St. Louis

- stevejack

What was wrong with it?

View SMP's profile

SMP

3203 posts in 881 days


#9 posted 12-01-2020 04:59 PM

Its funny. I worked in a shop a few years making custom speaker enclosures. The parent company just auto shipped us MDF, and it worked great. After leaving that job i bought some MDF at Home Depot to make a friend a speaker enclosure. I remember thinking “this is crap”, was nothing like the stuff my company used. If I routed the edges it became like a cardigan sweater. It was all garbage until I bought some from my local lumberyard where i buy my hardwood. I didn’t think there would be a difference, but there was.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6362 posts in 3285 days


#10 posted 12-01-2020 05:10 PM



Its funny. I worked in a shop a few years making custom speaker enclosures. The parent company just auto shipped us MDF, and it worked great. After leaving that job i bought some MDF at Home Depot to make a friend a speaker enclosure. I remember thinking “this is crap”, was nothing like the stuff my company used. If I routed the edges it became like a cardigan sweater. It was all garbage until I bought some from my local lumberyard where i buy my hardwood. I didn’t think there would be a difference, but there was.

- SMP


Same experience with Particle Board. Big Box is garbage compared what I can get at our local business that caters to the cabinetmakers in the anchorage area.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

1415 posts in 630 days


#11 posted 12-01-2020 06:08 PM

Same experience with plywood at Home Depot. The amount of gaps directly under the veneer layers has become unacceptable even for shop cabinets. I will be clearing a spot on the covered patio behind the shop to store some sheet goods. The local place that stocks cabinet grade sheet goods and services walk ins is a bit of a drive so I will just stock up whenever I go I guess.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8977 posts in 3553 days


#12 posted 12-01-2020 09:29 PM

Maybe some of the local cabinet shops can offer you some friendly advice.
Best of luck.

View Drew's profile

Drew

411 posts in 4076 days


#13 posted 12-01-2020 10:09 PM

Schaller hardwoods
St. Charles Hardwoods

-- TruCraftFurniture.com

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6362 posts in 3285 days


#14 posted 12-01-2020 11:14 PM

Plug in your material and your zip code. See what comes up.

https://woodfinder.com/search.php

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

7320 posts in 3385 days


#15 posted 12-03-2020 02:49 AM

I agree it used to be better quality. Rarely use the stuff but this past year I made a top for my friends new Snap On tool box. Made it up after he brought me the Formica he wanted and it looked good. THAT started something. 15 toolboxes later I restocked my Formica collection from all the scraps I keep from each top.

To make toolbox tops for people I glue it to 1 1/2 inch in thickness using biscuits to align. Then wrap it in 3/4 maple all the way around. Then put Formica on top and sides. Bottom is usually routed out to fit top of toolbox so I paint that with Rustoleum black to protect against water intrusion. Maybe a bit much but hey it has worked for 25 years on my box at work. The side edges just do not have good adhesion letting the Formica peel back, or the damage easily, same problem.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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