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Leveling feet for miter station

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Forum topic by woodetal posted 11-30-2020 04:37 PM 341 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodetal

92 posts in 746 days


11-30-2020 04:37 PM

The miter station is receiving a much needed make over. The past station improvised with an old cabinet and left over sheet goods. Now i am working through the miter saw install with extensions. Questions: I want to use leveling feet on the miter saw. 1/4 20 bolts. The hand drill into the base worked for three of the taps. Getting the hand drill accurate has been the issue. Using a 17/64 bit produced a hole size that the tap would not engage. Any ideas on stablizing the hand drill process? Or is the leveling feet idea just overkill? The drill press is not an option. Trim on baltic birch: The exposed ply face needs something. I am not building furniture BUT, adding some trim would reduce splinters. Routing over the edge on ply? Last Question: BLO for the finish??? As always, thanks for the thoughts and assist. Best, Brian


7 replies so far

View prazbotta's profile

prazbotta

12 posts in 249 days


#1 posted 12-01-2020 04:10 PM

Question 1:
Drill a smaller hole first, say 1/8”, then ramp up to the finish size. An alternative may be to use a drill guide like this. There are cheaper and more expensive options out there. Maybe even a drill guide like this would work.

Trim on baltic birch:
I generally like to add a piece of 1/2×3/4 trim to the edges of my plywood shelving. An alternative is to cut the plywood close, and finish the cut with a flush trim router. It gives a nicer edge than a saw will. You can also bullnose the edge for a pretty neat look.

BLO for the finish???:
Sure it will work. I have not had a lot of experience with BLO, but I did read mineral oil may soak onto the wood better. Probably the same look, same durability.

View nicksmurf111's profile

nicksmurf111

377 posts in 2424 days


#2 posted 12-01-2020 07:54 PM

Don’t tap the machine, attach the bolts to the other surface and put a locking nut on the machine side. Have the machine float, or be captive between two nuts.

-- Nicholas

View HackFabrication's profile

HackFabrication

212 posts in 685 days


#3 posted 12-03-2020 02:03 AM

Most of my shop ‘stuff’ is trimmed with 3/4” oak. I like the contrast between the matte finished plywood and oak.

I’ve switch from BLO to latex polyurethane for my shop furniture. Goes on easy, dries fast (saves time between re-coats), and doesn’t smell up the house. Three coats minimum, with four or five optimal. You can get it in a variety of finish sheens. Here’s an 8’ shelf I just finished (gloss poly) made from 3/4” maple plywood with pine trim (couldn’t find any oak):

Folding outfeed table, 1/2” plywood top (over 2×4 frame) done with oak trim. Four coats of matte poly then waxed:

Miter box enclosure, 1/2” plywood and some oak trim. Matte poly and wax:

-- "In the end, it's all Hack..."

View Robert's profile

Robert

4315 posts in 2454 days


#4 posted 12-03-2020 02:39 PM

How about T nuts and a bolt from underneath, lock down with screw from the top.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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woodetal

92 posts in 746 days


#5 posted 12-03-2020 03:58 PM

Hmmm. Great thoughts. I never thought of going up from the cabinet side. There is plenty of room for the install. I guess when you have a hammer all you see are nails. After the first miter cabinet adjustment, the wing extensions were less than perfect—close, real close with a small offset. So, when this refit started and I got to the extensions, small shims were a thought. Then I saw a post on fastening the base to the cabinet. My first view of that assumed the knobs were a leveling feature. Nope. Just a knob to tighten down. That plan did use T-nuts. I need to add in some finish trim to the extensions and cabinet. Rounding over with ply always leaves a less than satisfactory surface. I have never used a latex poly. I used a water based varnish on an outdoor table and got a milky finish despite the clear label. So, I am looking into the latex poly. GREAT assist. Thanks to all for the design input and sharing the wealth of your experiences. THANKS AGAIN! Brian

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woodetal

92 posts in 746 days


#6 posted 12-03-2020 04:03 PM


Most of my shop stuff is trimmed with 3/4” oak. I like the contrast between the matte finished plywood and oak.

Absolutely great ideas. I have a TS outfeed table that flips up. Not as well thought out as yours. Door hinges would work better than the lag screws in the ends for a pivot point. They work, just not as refined. T-nuts and up from the bottom appear to be the concept. Going down from the top has easier access and adjustment. Updates later! Brian

View HackFabrication's profile

HackFabrication

212 posts in 685 days


#7 posted 12-03-2020 06:14 PM


I have never used a latex poly. I used a water based varnish on an outdoor table and got a milky finish despite the clear label. So, I am looking into the latex poly. GREAT assist.
- woodetal

I had been using the solvent based poly, but it takes a long time to dry. And I always seem to be in a rush to get things done. The water based poly dries quick (other than the initial coat). I can put 4-5 coats on, sanding in between, in under a day’s time. It seems to hold up good. My table saw outfeed table has seen some abuse as an assembly area. A good coat of paste wax helps. I use regular Johnson’s Paste Wax applied with 0000 steel wool. Let dry (a bit) then buff off. Smooooooth….

-- "In the end, it's all Hack..."

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