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Could I please get your opinion on this type of joint, strength, fit, etc.

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Forum topic by OldBull posted 11-30-2020 01:49 PM 1310 views 1 time favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OldBull

309 posts in 264 days


11-30-2020 01:49 PM

I am in need of a 1/8th” slot cutter and in my travels found a joint I am unfamiliar with, it is a rockler bit and it looks interesting. Where would you use this? It could make some of my joints very easy if it is strong. Would you be holding the piece vertical to run it through ? I am beginning to make boxes and small things working my way up.

Thanks for any insight
Donny

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20 replies so far

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Steve

2367 posts in 1551 days


#1 posted 11-30-2020 02:11 PM

That’s called a lock miter bit. Do a youtube search to see how to set up the bit to make the cut.

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corelz125

2130 posts in 1944 days


#2 posted 11-30-2020 02:16 PM

That’s a lock miter bit. It makes a really strong miter. Watch a few videos on how to set it up and use it. One piece goes through flat on the router table the other goes up against the fence. It takes some testing to get them dialed in but you can either make or buy a set up block. The block will get you close buy might have to fine tune to get it exact.

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OldBull

309 posts in 264 days


#3 posted 11-30-2020 02:21 PM

Thanks folks for the help, I will check out the videos.

After watching the setup and sloppiness of joint I am going to say nuh uh!!!!

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corelz125

2130 posts in 1944 days


#4 posted 11-30-2020 04:37 PM

When you get it dialed in it’s a tight joint and the miter is perfect. If you get perfect miters already then you can do without it.

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Loren

10921 posts in 4616 days


#5 posted 11-30-2020 05:05 PM

You might want to look into a drawer lock joint. You can buy bits for it or use slot cutters. I made some jigs to do it with one slot cutter years ago, but later I bought a bit and use it instead of rabbets sometimes. Looks a little fancy at the end.

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splintergroup

4365 posts in 2190 days


#6 posted 11-30-2020 07:45 PM

Makes a great joint for boxes that are a joy to glue up and clamp.

I love the setup instructions here

Another trick I use is after getting the setup done, I use double-sided tape to attack a piece of thin temper board that is the exact same dimensions as the workpiece. This gives the workpiece a solid surface to ride against the fence and helps insure a perfect cut.

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pottz

13686 posts in 1952 days


#7 posted 11-30-2020 08:00 PM

yeah it’s makes a very strong joint.you can but setup blocks that make it easy to use,or make your own.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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OldBull

309 posts in 264 days


#8 posted 11-30-2020 08:03 PM

Thanks everyone I will take a second look.

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OldBull

309 posts in 264 days


#9 posted 11-30-2020 08:53 PM

Some of the setup blocks look small and rest on the plastic throat plates (with it’s dips and imperfections), I wonder if that is a problem ?? Could a piece of wood partially cut by the bit (like a test cut) be a setup block ?

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splintergroup

4365 posts in 2190 days


#10 posted 11-30-2020 09:58 PM

Yes, once you have the cut dialed in with your test stock thickness, save it for setup!

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OldBull

309 posts in 264 days


#11 posted 11-30-2020 10:45 PM

this hit some missing points for me.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsPBLvPuBNE

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CWWoodworking

1302 posts in 1147 days


#12 posted 11-30-2020 11:57 PM

OP, nothing wrong with a lock miter.

but if I were to go through the set up and routing, I would go a little further and do dovetails. Not much more work if you have a good jig. This all depends on what your doing of course.

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1240 posts in 872 days


#13 posted 12-01-2020 12:47 AM

I think a well formed spline miter would be stronger and look neater.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Andybb

3041 posts in 1572 days


#14 posted 12-01-2020 01:11 AM

Here is my lock miter post.

Here is Rich's which I learned a lot from. He shows you a few different methods of getting the setup dialed in. I have tried all of the methods that he posted including buying his Infinity Tools jig. They all work.

The devil is in the setup. Get it right and it’s a wonderful thing.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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pottz

13686 posts in 1952 days


#15 posted 12-01-2020 01:31 AM



I think a well formed spline miter would be stronger and look neater.

- Phil32


in that application yes but for long edges like in box making the lock miter gives the best glue surface and locks the joint together better.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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