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Advice on cutting down cabinet for fridge

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Forum topic by Evilsports posted 11-29-2020 03:16 PM 318 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Evilsports

15 posts in 64 days


11-29-2020 03:16 PM

Good morning folks.

I’ve decided that after 3 years of looking at an ugly mess above our fridge, I would finally attempt to fix a long-standing problem.

We bought a new fridge back then and unfortunately I didn’t realize that it was a few inches too tall until it was too late. I had to remove the above fridge cabinet for it to fit, the fridge was a few inches taller than out old one.

I’m now hoping to cut the old cabinet down to fit. To be honest, I’m not too worried about cutting the doors down at this point. It’ll just be nice to have that space filled.

I’m an extremely beginner when it comes to woodworking (think 4 checkerboard cutting board and two raised planters.

My preliminary plan is to cut it the distance that I need, down from the top on my table saw. Strip the excess off and re-screw the top on.

Original fridge fit:

Existing space above new fridge:


16 replies so far

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Evilsports

15 posts in 64 days


#1 posted 11-29-2020 03:19 PM

This is the cabinet carcass that I need to make shorter to fit:

Thanks in advance for any advice or criticism.

Kevin.

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JackDuren

1425 posts in 1929 days


#2 posted 11-29-2020 03:20 PM

Pictures of the cabinet to be cut down?

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

8256 posts in 1682 days


#3 posted 11-29-2020 03:25 PM

I would just make a new cabinet for above fridge as it will be hard to cut doors down … seems you could have a new one made in the time it takes to take apart old one :<)))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

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Evilsports

15 posts in 64 days


#4 posted 11-29-2020 03:27 PM



I would just make a new cabinet for above fridge as it will be hard to cut doors down … seems you could have a new one made in the time it takes to take apart old one :<)))

- GR8HUNTER

Definitely considering this. Troubles lie in my inability to match the finish of the rest of the cabinets. It’s some type of a heat shrunk vinyl on the mdf, along with a decade of weathering.

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EllenWoodHead

146 posts in 345 days


#5 posted 11-29-2020 03:32 PM

Can you post a photo or two?

edit ha, you posted photos while I was writing. That is a prominent cabinet and any hackery will be noticed. So, never mind :)

-- "wood" and "good" rhyme, but not "food"

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Evilsports

15 posts in 64 days


#6 posted 11-29-2020 03:42 PM



Can you post a photo or two?

edit ha, you posted photos while I was writing. That is a prominent cabinet and any hackery will be noticed. So, never mind :)

- EllenWoodHead

Joinery appears to be stapled and glue? Could be dowels inside as well for all I know.

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EllenWoodHead

146 posts in 345 days


#7 posted 11-29-2020 04:19 PM

IMO it doesn’t matter what you do to the box, since that won’t show. Cut off the excess, buy a hunk of OSB or plywood to make a new top or bottom (easier than salvaging from glue and staples). Trimming the doors so they still look nice is the tricky bit. I’ve done this by cutting the doors in the middle to remove the extra height on a painted cabinet, then a new coat of paint hid the seams. They were raised panel doors, so cutting in the middle saved the hassle of restoring the profile.

Maybe you can make your cut along one of the rails, remove the excess, then glue it all back together. If the new seam along the stiles shows, you can probably find paint that will stick. Take the door with you to the paint store so they can match the color exactly.

-- "wood" and "good" rhyme, but not "food"

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Evilsports

15 posts in 64 days


#8 posted 11-29-2020 04:19 PM

Ok, so looking more closely, here’s where I’m at in my very marginal wisdom…

I need to make it 3” shorter, so to begin I could set my table saw and run the top of the cabinet through on both sides and the back.

After the cuts I would remove the cutoff sides and back from the top piece.

This would still leave me needing to cut down the back of the cabinet the thickness of the wood in order for the top to nest between the sides.

Can anybody advise me on a reasonable way to make that final cut on the back without removing the sides? I have a table saw, hand saw, and a jigsaw.

Thanks.

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SMP

3174 posts in 875 days


#9 posted 11-29-2020 04:47 PM

Oh its wrapped like RV cabinets? If it were me I would do one of two things:

1. Remove the crown molding from that section and raise the whole cabinet up so the top is level to the top of the adjacent cabinet. An unbutchered cabinet without crown would look better than a butchered cabinet w crown IMO.

2. Make a new door completely contrasting, say barn wood or something the wife likes the look of.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

6312 posts in 2357 days


#10 posted 11-29-2020 04:49 PM

If you can remove or avoid any metal fasteners, you can simply run the box through the table saw to cut bottom 3” off. Just set the fence so that the part you are cutting off is away from the fence. Rotate and repeat on each side. The last one will be the most difficult. Just make sure that it doesn’t fall or pinch the blade as you make the last cut. You could also do this with a circular saw and a straight edge/guide. If the metal fasteners are a problem then use a jig saw that has a blade that can cut through metal (at least where the fasteners are), though you’ll probably have to finish the corners with a hand saw unless you are comfortable tilting the saw to go around the corner. I would use screws to attach the new or salvaged bottom.

Since the door is what people will see, that may require a little more care. I would need to see better how it is constructed to provide advice on that.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Robert

4299 posts in 2450 days


#11 posted 11-29-2020 05:00 PM

3” is a lot to take off. I would be tempted to leave it alone and bump it up. If you can match the crown it can work.

Building a new box out of melamine and save the existing end panel as the right side. You’ll have to deal with attaching it. Screws at the top will be hidden by crown.

I would go with pocket screws. If you don’t have one they aren’t that expensive.

Cut equal amounts off the top and bottom of the doors. This will equalize the difference, and maintain the same hinge locations.

The problem is taking 1 1/2” off the rails is a lot.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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GR8HUNTER

8256 posts in 1682 days


#12 posted 11-29-2020 05:02 PM

very good advise from Nathan although the hardest part is going to be the doors they are probably glued and stapled or nailed on corners and they will be harder to take apart :<((

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

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Evilsports

15 posts in 64 days


#13 posted 11-29-2020 05:26 PM

Thank you very much for the advice and ideas. I’ll update as soon as I work up the nerve to cut this sucker.

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JackDuren

1425 posts in 1929 days


#14 posted 11-29-2020 05:34 PM

Agree bump it up and ad a 4” base at bottom…new crown at top….

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

6312 posts in 2357 days


#15 posted 11-30-2020 02:15 PM

BTW, this metal detecting stud finder is pretty handy for finding any metal you cannot see in case they drove a staple or brad in deep and it doesn’t show.

To bump the whole thing up, it seems like he would have to replace the long side that presumably goes all the way to the floor as well? EDIT: Or are you saying to add an extension on the bottom to lengthen it?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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