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Forum topic by stevejack posted 11-28-2020 03:27 PM 366 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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stevejack

213 posts in 289 days


11-28-2020 03:27 PM

Okay can anyone give me advise on this. I have a Pattern cutting bit in my router. I have a Positive Pattern (in the middle” screwed down to my table. The only way I can figure out HOW to secure the Aluminum clad plastic sheet for cutting to the pattern is to hot glue it down, It works but it takes time to dig the glue off the pattern and the Cut out piece.

Doing so also damages the POSITIVE PATTERN and will eventually damage it to the point were I have to make a new one.

ANYTHING


12 replies so far

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hairy

3191 posts in 4501 days


#1 posted 11-28-2020 04:02 PM

Double sided tape?

-- You can lead a horse to water, but you can't tie his shoes. Blaze Foley

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987Ron

223 posts in 286 days


#2 posted 11-28-2020 04:07 PM

+1 on Double sided tape

-- It's not a mistake it's a design opportunity

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bilyo

1256 posts in 2072 days


#3 posted 11-28-2020 04:11 PM

First. I assume that you are doing a large number of these and; Second. I assume that you can’t use screws to hold the work piece. My first thought is to glue a piece of scrap plastic laminate to your pattern to provide a smooth tough surface that will release more easily. You could either trim it to match the pattern or make it slightly smaller so the bearing won’t touch it. Then, rather than hot melt, try double sided tape and see if it works better. Also, try using a heat gun or hair dryer to warm the work piece and see if that helps the tape or glue release more easily.

Another thought is to make a double clamping system to hold one end at a time: clamp one end, trim the other end, then reverse the process. If you have one, a small trim router might work better for this. If you have a lot of this to do, it might be a good excuse to get one.

Another idea: The work piece looks like a regular rectangle except for one end and rounded corners. Can you cut three sides with your table saw and then use the pattern and router for the shape on the end. You would then have enough space at the other end for clamping. A 7 1/4 inch fine tooth carbide blade would work well for this.

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GR8HUNTER

8256 posts in 1682 days


#4 posted 11-28-2020 04:35 PM

THIS :<)))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

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AlanWS

110 posts in 4527 days


#5 posted 11-28-2020 04:38 PM

I like Bilyo’s suggestions, particularly the last.

You can use carry that approach a little farther by cutting one straight edge, then clamping down a template over that edge (aligned against a stop) using a T-slot cut into the template and an inexpensive clamp such as the Grizzly T27044 $15 pair. This allows you to cut three sides and the round corners on the other side in one operation.

Or use two templates.

-- Alan in Wisconsin

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stevejack

213 posts in 289 days


#6 posted 11-28-2020 04:45 PM

Yes I have some double sided tape I will try and YES I plan on a lot of these. The (PANEL) you see fits into a Routered relief routed into some MDF which I have a pattern cutting jig set up to cut just slightly larger than the panel… SEE IMAGE

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stevejack

213 posts in 289 days


#7 posted 11-28-2020 04:50 PM

I have tryed that and have had some fitting issues. My Pattern cutting jigs setup for the Panel and the INSET in the MDF works great I was just hopping for something a little bit more professorial so to speak to hold the panel in place while cutting it. For the Pattern cut into the Panel piece I am suing a SEE IMAGE bit but am considering a Spiral UP CUT pattern bit. The Bit is almost $100 and wonder if its worth it


I like Bilyo s suggestions, particularly the last.

You can use carry that approach a little farther by cutting one straight edge, then clamping down a template over that edge (aligned against a stop) using a T-slot cut into the template and an inexpensive clamp such as the Grizzly T27044 $15 pair. This allows you to cut three sides and the round corners on the other side in one operation.

Or use two templates.

- AlanWS


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stevejack

213 posts in 289 days


#8 posted 11-28-2020 04:51 PM

Considering this bit for the Panel cutting

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bilyo

1256 posts in 2072 days


#9 posted 11-28-2020 08:34 PM

Well, it looks like you end up with some holes for switches in the work piece. Why not start out with a couple of screws at those locations. Screws will be more secure than either glue or tape and easier to remove.

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stevejack

213 posts in 289 days


#10 posted 11-28-2020 08:49 PM

HUUMMMMM!!!! Look at the big brain on BILYO! YES. I would have to counter sink them but YES!!!


Well, it looks like you end up with some holes for switches in the work piece. Why not start out with a couple of screws at those locations. Screws will be more secure than either glue or tape and easier to remove.

- bilyo


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bilyo

1256 posts in 2072 days


#11 posted 11-28-2020 10:13 PM

Glad to help. Could you make an auxiliary router base with some grooves that will pass over the screw heads?

Or, something like this will get the job done quickly.

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LesB

2790 posts in 4412 days


#12 posted 11-29-2020 06:00 PM

I responded on your other post about the bits suggesting you check out machine mill end bits which are relatively inexpensive and come in HSS, Cobalt and Carbide ranging in price from $10 up.

Another bit is from Amana that has the bearing but the cutters are set at an angle for upshearing which should make a cleaner cut and only $23.00
https://www.toolstoday.com/v-9811-45475-s.html?glCountry=US&glCurrency=USD&ne_ppc_id=1701009076&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI9rOK76mo7QIVYR6tBh0fNwYSEAQYAiABEgJshvD_BwE

-- Les B, Oregon

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