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Handle and tote refinish

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Forum topic by GrumpyGolfGuy posted 11-27-2020 09:15 PM 275 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GrumpyGolfGuy

100 posts in 272 days


11-27-2020 09:15 PM

I’m in the process of restoring a Bailey #4 handplane, but looking at the handle and tote im not positive they need refinishing. If i were to refinish them im not entirely sure how and with what?

Chris


3 replies so far

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sansoo22

1415 posts in 630 days


#1 posted 11-27-2020 09:35 PM

It’s really a personal preference. I refinish all the handles of all the planes I restore. Some people like the patina look with aged handles and others, like myself, go for a highly polished looked that has the plane looking almost brand new.

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KYtoolsmith

203 posts in 836 days


#2 posted 11-28-2020 12:11 AM

For a finish that can emulate a well used tool or the fine polish of a new tool, I use Minwax Antique oil. I just keep adding coats and sand (400 grit or higher) until I get the level of luster I’m going for. If a high shine is desired, after the last coat, I polish with a soft cotton rag using Behlens polish. I let each coat cure for at least 8 hours before following with another. I often use wax free shellac or sanding sealer before the first coat of antique oil. Time consuming…yes. But the results frequently get “oh wow” comments from the recipients.
I use this method on many things… Turned items, furniture, and yes, tool restoration.
Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

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sansoo22

1415 posts in 630 days


#3 posted 11-28-2020 02:47 AM



For a finish that can emulate a well used tool or the fine polish of a new tool, I use Minwax Antique oil. I just keep adding coats and sand (400 grit or higher) until I get the level of luster I m going for. If a high shine is desired, after the last coat, I polish with a soft cotton rag using Behlens polish. I let each coat cure for at least 8 hours before following with another. I often use wax free shellac or sanding sealer before the first coat of antique oil. Time consuming…yes. But the results frequently get “oh wow” comments from the recipients.
I use this method on many things… Turned items, furniture, and yes, tool restoration.
Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

- KYtoolsmith

I’ve seen the non polished version of this finish my self. It looks fantastic and is kind of hard to describe how it feels in the hands. Its almost velvety feeling. It definitely has that antique yet very well maintained look and feel to it.

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