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Is there a jig or a way to bring the studs of a wall frame in the same plane (prep for tiling)?

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Forum topic by MiniMe posted 11-27-2020 05:54 PM 1890 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MiniMe

427 posts in 1261 days


11-27-2020 05:54 PM

I had to remove and then rebuild a section of wall frame
I did the best to install the new section of the frame and to align it to the existing segment (think about two frames build separately and installed on the same wall adjacent to each other)
I am going to install cement board and then large tiles so I need this to be as flat as possible
Is there a way to properly plane all these studs (5 in total) and make sure that the edges facing the interior are all in the same plane? I am thinking of a jig or something like that

I do have an electric planner but from my measurements the studs have stretches where they are caved or bowed and the overall alignment is not good. They say you need 1/16” flatness error for installing large tiles and I am afraid that the electric plane is going to be way to rough for this. Hand plane and straight edge ?


31 replies so far

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Loren

11250 posts in 4857 days


#1 posted 11-27-2020 06:04 PM

I’ve used levels and string wound around nails to figure out that sort of thing. If you have a 4 ft level that might be a good one to use. You’d be using it both to assess deviations from plumb but also straightness in the studs. You don’t need everything plumb but you do need to find the high spots.

You can also shim the corners until the diagonal strings touch in the middle. Then shim from there based on those corners being in the same plane. This may be the more sensible approach than planing the studs down.

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MiniMe

427 posts in 1261 days


#2 posted 11-27-2020 06:10 PM

I have a laser level as well …I tried to use that but it is difficult to have a reference and to compare (the light will hit one of the studs and it will stop there)
I have a 8’ level and that tells me that one of the studs ruins everything ( I change that stud once but with no sensible improvement)

I was thinking about a jig that would allow me to slide a tool up and down and shave the surplus wood)
Edit:like this

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Loren

11250 posts in 4857 days


#3 posted 11-27-2020 06:17 PM

ah. Screw wood rails to the side of the stud and using a template guide ring use a router to remove the material to the depth you want. Whatever is left over can be removed with a chisel.

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MiniMe

427 posts in 1261 days


#4 posted 11-27-2020 09:40 PM

I think this is easier said than done.
I would need to make sure I set the router (or the guides) at the same distance from the wall every time
I think I will have to go with the usual, straight edge and a hand plane (or electric plane set to very small depth)

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bold1

359 posts in 3056 days


#5 posted 11-27-2020 09:46 PM

Hang your cement board. Then mortar the wall and straight edge the mortar. All dips will be filled in. Same as rough plastering a wall. Some of the older plasterer/tile men would call it Darbying.

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Robert

4713 posts in 2690 days


#6 posted 11-27-2020 10:17 PM

What’s on the other side of the wall?

A carpenters way to do this is cut a notch in the stud and either shim (if bowed in) or push it in and toe nail it.

However, you risk damaging the wall material on the other side.

So do what bold1 said. Tilers commonly float out uneven walls and floors.

Your other option is sister nailers on to the studs and bring it out level.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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MiniMe

427 posts in 1261 days


#7 posted 11-27-2020 10:52 PM



What s on the other side of the wall?

A carpenters way to do this is cut a notch in the stud and either shim (if bowed in) or push it in and toe nail it.

However, you risk damaging the wall material on the other side.

So do what bold1 said. Tilers commonly float out uneven walls and floors.

Your other option is sister nailers on to the studs and bring it out level.

- Robert


I have read about all these methods but I don’t think they will work for this particular situation
If I run a straight edge (8’ level) across the studs I am seeing different situations in different areas
the above will fix a caved (C shape) stud but not one ore more that have an S profile

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corelz125

3560 posts in 2185 days


#8 posted 11-28-2020 01:11 AM

If you sister the studs like Robert said you just find the stud that sticks out the most and go from there. The easiest way is to just add more thinset where the wall is off. The extra thinset fills the gap where the stud is bowed. Not many walls are straight and flat when they get tiled.

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tomsteve

1182 posts in 2428 days


#9 posted 11-28-2020 02:57 AM

when walls have to be that accurate, laminated veneer studs.

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xedos

413 posts in 510 days


#10 posted 11-28-2020 03:44 AM


What s on the other side of the wall?

A carpenters way to do this is cut a notch in the stud and either shim (if bowed in) or push it in and toe nail it.

However, you risk damaging the wall material on the other side.

So do what bold1 said. Tilers commonly float out uneven walls and floors.

Your other option is sister nailers on to the studs and bring it out level.

- Robert

I have read about all these methods but I don t think they will work for this particular situation
If I run a straight edge (8 level) across the studs I am seeing different situations in different areas
the above will fix a caved (C shape) stud but not one ore more that have an S profile

- MiniMe

Robert’s advise on sistering will absolutely work.

Two strings crossed in an “x” will give you a better picture of what’s going on over a broader area.

LVL studs are well worth their cost for tiled walls. Especially mosaic tile.

DO NOT use thinset as to fill in gaps, depressions ect. No thinset is rated or warrantied for such purpose.

If you can still find a tile setter that does mud work , you wouldn’t have to do anything except make the call. And pay. He’ll make the wall flat and plumb regardless of how knarly your studs. Hard to find those guys these days though.

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corelz125

3560 posts in 2185 days


#11 posted 11-28-2020 04:24 AM

I have 16”×16”×1/2” tiles in my bathroom I know there isn’t any wall in my house that’s within a 1/16”. Laticrete has products that can go from 3/32” to 3/4” for a thick bed wall.

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tomd

2222 posts in 4980 days


#12 posted 11-28-2020 05:21 AM

Put up your cement board then level it with the thin set.

-- Tom D

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Craftsman on the lake

3873 posts in 4647 days


#13 posted 11-28-2020 06:03 AM

The way I’ve done it.. I put a string across the studs, usually if there’s a protruding one it’s at the midpoint. Then use a sharp axe and tap it like a chisel down the stud until they’re in line with each other.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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MiniMe

427 posts in 1261 days


#14 posted 11-28-2020 02:10 PM

OK I did not think about crossing two wires along the wall to see what is going on
I will try that on top of using the level
Agree, I do not trust the thin set for this task
Re: tilers who could do it- I don’t have that budget. If someone charges more than I make and I can learn that think then it is the time to learn a new skill. I do not need to be an expert in tiling but I could certainly read and learn to do what I need in my case …

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northwoodsman

643 posts in 4956 days


#15 posted 11-28-2020 03:39 PM

A straight edge or a laser. Don’t think that you need to plane all the studs to a low point, use shims in those areas. Don’t overthink this. I can understand that 1/16” is important on a floor but their won’t be any weight or pressure on a wall. You have some wiggle room with the bonding agent, it may be thicker in some areas and thinner in others, the cement board should provide a very flat surface.

-- NorthWoodsMan

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