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Is my resaw king blade defective?

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Forum topic by Thorbjorn88 posted 11-26-2020 09:13 PM 878 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Thorbjorn88

204 posts in 1110 days


11-26-2020 09:13 PM

I got a Laguna 1412 bandsaw this week from woodcraft with a free resaw king blade. The blade seems to have a bad weld and jumps forward almost 1/8” near the weld when running. Here are links to two videos I made showing this:

https://youtu.be/pPwnawEVkjs
https://youtu.be/qluRPr3bg1Y

There also looks like there’s some rust on it:

What do you think? Should I send it back? Or is there something wrong with my setup?

-- Dave


32 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3582 posts in 2766 days


#1 posted 11-26-2020 09:24 PM

It’s the blade ask for a new one.
Getting perfectly welded blades are actually more rare then bad ones.
For me they are.
Good Luck

-- Aj

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Rich

6390 posts in 1557 days


#2 posted 11-26-2020 09:52 PM

That’s how my ReSaw King behaved when it was about to break. The failure starts in the top of the gullet, and as it opens up, the blade will thrust forward at that location. It can happen from over-tensioning, but yours looks like it was bad out of the box. Like Aj said, exchange it. Woodcraft will take it back no questions asked, although if it’s not in stock you’ll have to wait for them to order one.

A good thing to have in your shop is the https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop/tools/power-tool-accessories/41049-bandsaw-blade-splicing-kit?item=03J5901 from Lee Valley. I’ve used it on the Laguna blade and it worked great.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Bstrom

258 posts in 141 days


#3 posted 11-27-2020 06:22 PM

Wow – that sounds like an odd manufacturing issue to have. My Timberwolf resaw blade runs perfectly out of the box.

-- Bstrom

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Rich

6390 posts in 1557 days


#4 posted 11-27-2020 07:31 PM


Wow – that sounds like an odd manufacturing issue to have. My Timberwolf resaw blade runs perfectly out of the box.

- Bstrom

That’s a rare issue for Laguna, and it will outlast the TimberWolf several times over. There’s really no comparing the two blades.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Kelly

3279 posts in 3912 days


#5 posted 11-28-2020 02:09 AM

I’m with Aj.

Might as well buy Olsen blade versus high end ones. Just checked one spendy varmit and it’s off a fraction of a degree, which is all it takes to get thumping.

It seems less a problem on my little Powermatic than it does on the Rikon, which has an adjustable lower wheel shaft.

Just for reference, on smaller blades, on my Powermatic, I get more thumping if I crank up the tension. The thumping grows and shows as a warning of breakage.

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woodbutcherbynight

7233 posts in 3377 days


#6 posted 11-28-2020 02:56 AM



Wow – that sounds like an odd manufacturing issue to have. My Timberwolf resaw blade runs perfectly out of the box.

- Bstrom

I have had 3, only one was bad . To there credit when I sent proof it was an issue they were quick to get me a new one.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Kelly

3279 posts in 3912 days


#7 posted 11-28-2020 03:20 AM

One out of three high end blades bad. That’s not a good number. Especially when you consider manufacturers can make millions of nails that are within a few thousandths of each other.

Wish I’d paid more attention. My buddy had five cedar mills with [semi] big boy band saws they used to cut redwood cedar shingles. He sharpened his own and welded them back together from time to time. They were ABOUT thirteen foot blades, but only about 1-1/2 inch. They managed to keep them pretty straight.

With lasers and crap, there really is no excuse for blades not being within some pretty tight specs.

View Bstrom's profile

Bstrom

258 posts in 141 days


#8 posted 11-28-2020 03:33 AM



One out of three high end blades bad. That s not a good number. Especially when you consider manufacturers can make millions of nails that are within a few thousandths of each other.

Wish I d paid more attention. My buddy had five cedar mills with [semi] big boy band saws they used to cut redwood cedar shingles. He sharpened his own and welded them back together from time to time. They were ABOUT thirteen foot blades, but only about 1-1/2 inch. They managed to keep them pretty straight.

With lasers and crap, there really is no excuse for blades not being within some pretty tight specs.

- Kelly


That was my thought – the dangers of blade breakage is a real priority and having to alert a manufacturer about product quality is a little late in the game – for you, that is. Just the same, keeping one’s tools in proper adjustment, etc. the other side of the story and cannot be overstated. I view woodworking as a continual learning experience to keep it safe as much as productive.

-- Bstrom

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CWWoodworking

1300 posts in 1147 days


#9 posted 11-28-2020 03:48 AM

Manufacturers make mistakes. What they do to correct them is the key.

I got a bad batch of 10 blades. The teeth were not alternating. I notified my supplier. They were supposed to hand check next batch and over night. They overnighted but same issue which means nobody checked them.

Needless to say they lost my business. 50-100 blades a year.

View Rich's profile

Rich

6390 posts in 1557 days


#10 posted 11-28-2020 04:07 AM

Honestly, the comments about the ReSaw King here are wrong. First of all, I’ve used them for years with one issue. I over-tensioned one once and it broke at the gullet—my fault, not the blade. If you understand the physics of material failures, you’ll understand why a blade starts to fail at that point and the “thumping” is the harbinger if its ultimate demise. The ReSaw King has no equal. Period.

Want to compare one to the TimberWolf, the WoodSlicer or any other steel blade? Good luck. The ReSaw King will outlast several before it dulls, and when it does—you send it off to get it resharpened. It can be resharpened up to four times for less than the cost of the TimberWolf each time.

And, during the time between being resharpened, it’s not dulling at the same rate as steel (it’s carbide), which means your cuts will be superior far longer.

What happens as a band saw blade dulls? It takes more force to push the board into the cut. If you’re resawing a wide board, that means the blade is under stress, and it will do things like start to bow in the middle. You’ll see the blade following the center of the board and all seems well, but when you finish, you have one board with a concave face, and the other convex. That often means that by the time you plane them flat, you lack the thickness you expected and planned for, and you’ve wasted a board.

So, while I often argue that a $150 ReSaw King is really five blades for $310 after four $40 resharpenings, it’s really a dozen or more when compared to steel blades. Plus, it will produce better results far longer during those sharp-to-dull intervals.

But, hey, stick with what you feel comfortable with. I’ve used the ReSaw King, the TimberWolf and the WoodSlicer and my decision to stick with the Laguna blade is an easy one.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

7233 posts in 3377 days


#11 posted 11-28-2020 04:54 AM



Honestly, the comments about the ReSaw King here are absurd. First of all, I ve used them for years with one issue. I over-tensioned one once and it broke at the gullet—my fault, not the blade. If you understand the physics of material failures, you ll understand why a blade starts to fail at that point and the “thumping” is the harbinger if its ultimate demise. The ReSaw King has no equal. Period.

Want to compare one to the TimberWold, the WoodSlicer or any other steel blade? Good luck. The ReSaw King will outlast several before it dulls, and when it does—you send it off to get it resharpened. It can be resharpened up to four times for less than the cost of the TimberWolf each time.

And, during the time between being resharpened, it s not dulling at the same rate as steel (it s carbide), which means your cuts will be superior far longer.

What happens as a band saw blade dulls? It takes more force to push the board into the cut. If you re resawing a wide board, that means the blade is under stress, and it will do things like start to bow in the middle. You ll see the blade following the center of the board and all seems well, but when you finish, you have one board with a concave face, and the other convex. That often means that by the time you plane them flat, you lack the thickness you expected and planned for, and you ve wasted a board.

So, while I often argue that a $150 ReSaw King is really five blades for $310 after four $40 resharpenings, it s really a dozen or more when compared to steel blades. Plus, it will produce better results far longer during those sharp-to-dull intervals.

But, hey, stick with what you feel comfortable with. I ve used the ReSaw King, the TimberWolf and the WoodSlicer and my decision to stick with the Laguna blade is an easy one.

- Rich

Not questioning the superiority of the blade. I know better. LOL They had them in the BS at Camp Cedar so I was able to play one afternoon and see for myself. Now stepping up to a Laguna BS, that would be nice. Just not happening while I am here in the US. Not really interested in taking 110 tools from here to go to Ukraine and convert or adapt, or worse pay for shipping from here. OMG….. LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2215 posts in 3761 days


#12 posted 11-28-2020 10:44 AM

One of three blades was bad? Did you buy three more and get another one with a problem? Or was it one in a hundred or a thousand and you got the bad one. If buying one blade, and you got the defective blade, that is ‘every blade I bought was bad’. It depends on the perspective.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

7233 posts in 3377 days


#13 posted 11-28-2020 02:18 PM



One of three blades was bad? Did you buy three more and get another one with a problem? Or was it one in a hundred or a thousand and you got the bad one. If buying one blade, and you got the defective blade, that is every blade I bought was bad . It depends on the perspective.

- ibewjon

Good point and we should consider same for OPs blade as well. In my situation I bought a 3/4 blade for resaw. Liked it so ordered a 3/16 blade for circle cutting jig and tighter arcs. Then bought a smaller BS for general work. The blade that came with the saw was so so. Ordered new one for that. It thumped badly and upon inspection it was obvious blade weld had an issue.

Like Rich I have broken a blade from overtighening.
My bad and I just got another one. But I did get a tensioning jig from Carter to take tension off blade when not in use.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Thorbjorn88's profile

Thorbjorn88

204 posts in 1110 days


#14 posted 11-28-2020 02:34 PM

OP back again. Good to hear about everyone’s experiences. Good news for the Timberwolf crowd when I bought the saw I also ordered 1/4 and 1/2 blades from Timberwolf for my everyday use. As for the resaw king blade woodcraft has another one in stock I’ll go get this exchanged for this afternoon.

Thanks for the advice all!

-- Dave

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5975 posts in 4212 days


#15 posted 11-28-2020 06:24 PM

I’ve never ha a problem with Starrett blades. The weld is perfect to the point it doesn’t show. That means a smooth run through the guides with no “thumps”. Any blade with a weld area that is thicker than the blade itself is faulty and should be returned.

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