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Finishing QS White Oak...Need Advice ***UPDATED**

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Forum topic by fivecodys posted 11-25-2020 09:29 PM 961 views 2 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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fivecodys

1722 posts in 2612 days


11-25-2020 09:29 PM

Hi Guys,
I am in the process of building this clock from WOOD Magazine plans.

I have never worked with QS White Oak and so I am reaching out for advice.
I sprayed a few coats of lacquer on some test pieces but it still seems like they needs some color.
Maybe Danish oil first then lacquer?

I love the color of the clock in the picture.

Any advice or techniques you are willing to share would be greatly appreciated.

Happy Holidays!

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.


26 replies so far

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SMP

3203 posts in 881 days


#1 posted 11-25-2020 11:14 PM

If you want a simple straightforward finish that will add some color and look like what you are going for, check out Mike Pekovich’s article on using waterlox followed by dark brown wax. This worked well on some pieces i just did:
https://www.finewoodworking.com/2011/05/18/how-to-apply-wiping-varnish

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Dave Mills

56 posts in 375 days


#2 posted 11-25-2020 11:18 PM

I followed this guide to try to match some Stickley furniture. It’s a bit more of a project than slapping one can of something on, but kind of fun to try to match some of the classics. He has “recipes” for several versions.

https://homesteadfinishingproducts.com/jeff-jewitts-mission-oak-finish/

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bilyo

1256 posts in 2078 days


#3 posted 11-25-2020 11:20 PM

It really depends on what you like. If you don’t like the look of lacquer alone, you may like the look of danish and lacquer or poly better. You might also like the look of a mix of equal parts linseed oil, poly, and mineral spirits. Also, don’t overlook the possibility of a dye to give the wood some color before applying the final finish. As you have done already, test anything new on some scrap first.

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Dark_Lightning

4321 posts in 4085 days


#4 posted 11-26-2020 12:42 AM

What kind of look are you trying to achieve? I’ve seen some stunning pieces finished here. I spent a ton of money on some nicely figured QSWO and then finished it with a water based poly which nearly completely obscured the figure. I may go back and grind it all off and start over.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

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fivecodys

1722 posts in 2612 days


#5 posted 12-01-2020 09:08 PM



If you want a simple straightforward finish that will add some color and look like what you are going for, check out Mike Pekovich’s article on using waterlox followed by dark brown wax. This worked well on some pieces i just did:
https://www.finewoodworking.com/2011/05/18/how-to-apply-wiping-varnish

- SMP

I have ordered the Waterlox and the tinted wax. Can the Waterlox be applied over a stain?
I have been testing a few sample pieces and I really like Minwax Golden Oak on the QWO but I’m not sure what will happen when the two meet. The Waterlox should be here by Friday so I still have plenty of time before Christmas.

Thank for your help.

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

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Madmark2

2096 posts in 1564 days


#6 posted 12-01-2020 09:15 PM

Amber shellac is traditional.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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fivecodys

1722 posts in 2612 days


#7 posted 12-01-2020 09:28 PM



Amber shellac is traditional.

- Madmark2

Hummm….Thanks Mark. I hadn’t thought about that.

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

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Rich

6398 posts in 1565 days


#8 posted 12-01-2020 09:46 PM


I have ordered the Waterlox and the tinted wax. Can the Waterlox be applied over a stain?

- fivecodys

Yes it can. Be sure to give the stain a couple of days to cure if you use oil based stain. Water based will be ready in less time, as will dye.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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fivecodys

1722 posts in 2612 days


#9 posted 12-01-2020 10:44 PM


I have ordered the Waterlox and the tinted wax. Can the Waterlox be applied over a stain?

- fivecodys

Yes it can. Be sure to give the stain a couple of days to cure if you use oil based stain. Water based will be ready in less time, as will dye.

Thanks Rich.

- Rich


-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

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LesB

2798 posts in 4419 days


#10 posted 12-02-2020 12:24 AM

With all the intricate corners and edges you might consider using a wipe on top coat to avoid drips and runs….unless you are equipped to spray it.. Wipe on poly would work, or Madmark’s amber shellac also wipes on with a lint free cloth. At warm temperatures the shellac will dry quickly (in minutes) but be careful not to over work it because it can get tacky and messy. If you need more than two coats wait 24 hours for the 3rd coat. Shellac cleans up with household ammonia and water, but I just throw the cloth I use away.

The stain I use to get the color I see in the pict is an oil base Golden Oak….several mfgs make it. Wipe on and wipe off repeat if you don’t get the darkness you want

-- Les B, Oregon

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fivecodys

1722 posts in 2612 days


#11 posted 12-08-2020 04:16 PM

So I decided on the Waterlox & Wax process.

Here it is unfinished -VS- just the first Coat of Waterlox

I have now applied 3 coats (sanding in between) and after it dries for a few days I am going to apply the tinted wax.

I am very happy with the color. My pictures really doesn’t do it justice.

I will post the finished project in a week or so.

Thank you all for your finishing input.
I really appreciate it.

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

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SMP

3203 posts in 881 days


#12 posted 12-08-2020 04:33 PM

Wow, looks great already!

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Ocelot

2814 posts in 3614 days


#13 posted 12-08-2020 04:37 PM

It’s too late now, but I’m surprised nobody mentioned fuming it with amonia. (sp?)

It is the traditional stickly finish, I understand. Just bag/tent it with an open dish of strong ammonia and give it some time. Then final finish over that.

I’ve never done it!

-Paul

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

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fivecodys

1722 posts in 2612 days


#14 posted 12-08-2020 05:19 PM



It s too late now, but I m surprised nobody mentioned fuming it with amonia. (sp?)

It is the traditional stickly finish, I understand. Just bag/tent it with an open dish of strong ammonia and give it some time. Then final finish over that.

I ve never done it!

-Paul

- Ocelot

I actually read a little about that Paul but it kind of made me nervous. They kept using the phrase “Toxic Fumes”. :)

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

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splintergroup

4426 posts in 2198 days


#15 posted 12-08-2020 05:38 PM

Fuming is actually really easy and in my mind the best benefit (aside from the color) is the finish penetrates the wood deeply so no worries about corners getting rubbed bare.

The prominent issue is your wood all needs to be from the same tree/board since the fuming depends on the woods tannin content. You can alter fuming times for various pieces to try and match up the tones but that comes with experience.

Fuming is a nice alternative for white oak, but certainly you can emulate it with dyes nowadays.

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

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